Route Fifty: Why Employers Find It So Hard to Test for Covid

Route Fifty: Why Employers Find It So Hard to Test for Covid. “The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued guidance to employers to include Covid testing, and it advised that people working in close quarters be tested periodically. However, the federal government does not require employers to offer those tests. But the board overseeing the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, known as Cal/OSHA, on Thursday approved emergency safety rules that are soon likely to require the state’s employers to provide Covid testing to all workers exposed to an outbreak on the job at no cost to the employees. Testing must be repeated a week later, followed by periodic testing.”

Slate: Employers Are Sick of the Pandemic. Employees Are Paying the Price.

Slate: Employers Are Sick of the Pandemic. Employees Are Paying the Price.. “As an unsettling number of people have started ignoring public health guidance because they’re tired of restricting their behavior, employers too are increasingly relaxing their own practices even though the coronavirus continues to surge in many parts of the country. Employers are embracing the same magical thinking so many individuals are—we’re ready for it to be over, so we’ll just act as if it is—often at great expense to their workers.”

Coronavirus training by text message: How some companies are keeping workers informed (CNN)

CNN: Coronavirus training by text message: How some companies are keeping workers informed. “For the past three years, Hello Alfred has partnered with residential buildings to provide a concierge-like service for residents. But on Wednesday, the company announced it is allowing people, regardless of what building they live in, to use its service for food and essential goods deliveries in more than 20 US cities. Unlike many other delivery services, its workers, called ‘Alfreds,’ are employees who receive health benefits, sick leave, and more. The company is providing workers with masks, gloves and hand sanitizer, but it wanted to do more. That meant getting relevant information about coronavirus into the hands of its workers in an easy-to-use way to help protect them.”

Vice: Whole Foods Employees Are Staging a Nationwide ‘Sick-Out’

Vice: Whole Foods Employees Are Staging a Nationwide ‘Sick-Out’. “Whole Foods employees are planning to strike on Tuesday to protest the lack of protections offered to workers during the coronavirus pandemic—the first national collective action led by workers at the company since it was founded in 1980. On March 31, Whole Foods employees will call in sick to demand paid leave for all workers who stay home or self-quarantine during the crisis, free coronavirus testing for all employees, and hazard pay of double the current hourly wage for employees who show up to work during the pandemic.”

Chicago Tribune: Are you getting paid for that Instagram post? Companies tap employees to spread more ‘authentic’ message online.

Chicago Tribune: Are you getting paid for that Instagram post? Companies tap employees to spread more ‘authentic’ message online.. “Most major companies already have a presence on social media. Many partner with professional influencers hired for their audience. But some are now trying to add their own employees to the mix, whether they’re trying to attract customers, recruit new hires or just boost a brand’s image.”

The New York Times: Facebook Gives Workers a Chatbot to Appease That Prying Uncle

The New York Times: Facebook Gives Workers a Chatbot to Appease That Prying Uncle. “Some Facebook employees recently told their managers that they were concerned about answering difficult questions about their workplace from friends and family over the holidays…So just before Thanksgiving, Facebook rolled out something to help its workers: a chatbot that would teach them official company answers for dealing with such thorny questions.” This is so on-brand I laughed out loud.

BuzzFeed News: A Google Staffer Helped Sell Trump’s Family Separation Policy, Despite The Company Denials

BuzzFeed News: A Google Staffer Helped Sell Trump’s Family Separation Policy, Despite The Company Denials. “Google executives misled their own employees last week when they said a former top Department of Homeland Security official who had recently joined the company was ‘not involved in the family separation policy,’ government emails obtained under the Freedom of Information Act reveal.”

Fast Company: I’m a hacker, and here’s how your social media posts help me break into your company

Fast Company: I’m a hacker, and here’s how your social media posts help me break into your company. “Think twice before you snap and share that office selfie, #firstday badge pic, or group photo at work. Hackers are trolling social media for photos, videos, and other clues that can help them better target your company in an attack. I know this because I’m one of them.”

‘It’s Helpful to Know All Scales’: Online Spreadsheet Discloses Museum Workers’ Salaries (Art News)

Art News: ‘It’s Helpful to Know All Scales’: Online Spreadsheet Discloses Museum Workers’ Salaries. “In another sign of increasing demand for transparency at art institutions across the world, museum workers have begun making public their salary rates via a Google Spreadsheet document that began circulating on Friday morning. Titled ‘Art/Museum Salary Transparency 2019,’ the document allows users to add information about the terms of their employment and their rates of pay at some of the biggest museums in the world.”

TechCrunch: A former Google+ UI designer suggests inept management played a role in the network’s demise (beyond Facebook’s impact)

TechCrunch: A former Google+ UI designer suggests inept management played a role in the network’s demise (beyond Facebook’s impact). “A lot of people leave their jobs because of bosses they can’t stand. Yet it’s seldom the case that a former employee publicly badmouths management after the fact. The obvious risk in doing so: future employers might not want to gamble on this person badmouthing them at a later date. That isn’t stopping Morgan Knutson, a UI designer who seven years ago, spent eight months at Google working on its recently shuttered social networking product Google+ and who, in light of the shutdown, decided to share on Twitter his personal experience with how ‘awful the project and exec team was.’”

Tech Workers Now Want to Know: What Are We Building This For? (New York Times)

New York Times: Tech Workers Now Want to Know: What Are We Building This For?. “Across the technology industry, rank-and-file employees are demanding greater insight into how their companies are deploying the technology that they built. At Google, Amazon, Microsoft and Salesforce, as well as at tech start-ups, engineers and technologists are increasingly asking whether the products they are working on are being used for surveillance in places like China or for military projects in the United States or elsewhere.”

Bloomberg Quint: Inside Google’s Shadow Workforce

Bloomberg Quint: Inside Google’s Shadow Workforce. “Every day, tens of thousands of people stream into Google offices wearing red name badges. They eat in Google’s cafeterias, ride its commuter shuttles and work alongside its celebrated geeks. But they can’t access all of the company’s celebrated perks. They aren’t entitled to stock and can’t enter certain offices. Many don’t have health insurance.”

Harvard Business Review: Employees Who Use Social Media for Work Are More Engaged — but Also More Likely to Leave Their Jobs

Harvard Business Review: Employees Who Use Social Media for Work Are More Engaged — but Also More Likely to Leave Their Jobs . “Social media can be a powerful communication tool for employees, helping them to collaborate, share ideas and solve problems. Research has shown that 82% of employees think that social media can improve work relationships and 60% believe social media support decision-making processes. These beliefs contribute to a majority of workers connecting with colleagues on social media, even during work hours.”