New York Times: Facebook’s Parent Company Will Make Employees Do Their Own Laundry

New York Times: Facebook’s Parent Company Will Make Employees Do Their Own Laundry. “The salad days of Facebook’s lavish employee perks may be coming to an end. Meta, the parent company of Facebook, told employees on Friday that it was cutting back or eliminating free services like laundry and dry cleaning and was pushing back the dinner bell for a free meal from 6 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., according to seven company employees who spoke on the condition of anonymity.”

PsyPost: Having your camera on during virtual meetings promotes “Zoom fatigue” — especially among women and newer employees

PsyPost: Having your camera on during virtual meetings promotes “Zoom fatigue” — especially among women and newer employees. “Experimental findings published in the Journal of Applied Psychology revealed that employees who had their cameras on during virtual meetings experienced greater fatigue and, in turn, reduced performance during meetings. This was especially true for women and newer employees, suggesting that a heightened need for self-presentation may be the cause of this fatigue.”

CU Denver News: The Great Resignation & the Benefits of Quitting

CU Denver News: The Great Resignation & the Benefits of Quitting. “Outside a Burger King in Lincoln, Nebraska, employees put up a sign before leaving their posts. It read, ‘WE ALL QUIT’—and the photos quickly went viral. The employees who quit represent a major shift in U.S. employment, with increasing groups of people quitting, especially in industries like hospitality and health care. What has become known as “The Great Resignation” comes after more than 18 months of the COVID-19 pandemic. What exactly is happening with the country’s workforce?”

Report: Cultural institutions took federal money but still let go of workers (American Federation of State, County & Municipal Employees)

American Federation of State, County & Municipal Employees: Report: Cultural institutions took federal money but still let go of workers. “Some of the nation’s largest cultural institutions accepted more than $1.6 billion in federal help to weather the coronavirus pandemic, but continued to let go of workers – even though the assistance was meant to shore up payrolls and keep workers on the job, according to a report released by AFSCME Cultural Workers United.”

The 74: Interactive Map — The Great Shortage: Explore How Districts in All 50 States Are Grappling With Missing Teachers, Nurses, Cooks, Bus Drivers & Other Essential Workers

The 74: Interactive Map — The Great Shortage: Explore How Districts in All 50 States Are Grappling With Missing Teachers, Nurses, Cooks, Bus Drivers & Other Essential Workers. “Faced with burnout, low wages and now COVID-19, scores of education workers — including not just teachers but also school bus drivers, special education paraprofessionals, cafeteria and afterschool workers, nurses, school safety agents and custodians — have left their posts. Districts have been forced to cancel classes, close cafeterias and feed students pizza, bring back remote classes, and hire per diem emergency workers. School officials have also increased salaries and other incentives to attract and retain staff. The 74 has found school staffing shortages in all 50 states.”

Harvard Business School: Managers, Your Employees Don’t Want to Be Facebook ‘Friends’

Harvard Business School: Managers, Your Employees Don’t Want to Be Facebook ‘Friends’. “It can be challenging to navigate the boundaries between our workplace and personal lives, causing us to weigh whether to bring a plus-one to the office party or keep a family photo on our desk. But social media adds a whole new level of complexity, and today many employees are hesitant to ‘friend’ ​colleagues and managers online, fearing that the connection could come with career risks, according to a recent study in the Academy of Management Journal.”

University of Maryland: Pitfalls of the TikTok Resume Trend

University of Maryland: Pitfalls of the TikTok Resume Trend . “Employers who use TikTok, Facebook, Twitter or other social networks to evaluate job candidates run certain risks, including overlooking potentially strong non-video savvy applicants or unwittingly succumbing to bias, Stevens says. Social media profiles and TikTok resumes almost always include user images, which can reveal the candidate’s age, race, weight and level of attractiveness – factors that are more easily obscured in a resume.”

TechCrunch: Pittsburgh Google contractors ratify deal with HCL

TechCrunch: Pittsburgh Google contractors ratify deal with HCL. “Nearly two years ago, contractors for Google’s Pittsburgh operations voted to join the United Steelworkers union in a bid to secure more labor rights representation. It was an early example of a building union movement for tech workers across the spectrum. But as other hard-fought battles have been waged among blue and white collar workers alike, both sides have continued hashing out negotiations. This week, those have finally resulted in something more concrete.”

Route Fifty: Why Employers Find It So Hard to Test for Covid

Route Fifty: Why Employers Find It So Hard to Test for Covid. “The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued guidance to employers to include Covid testing, and it advised that people working in close quarters be tested periodically. However, the federal government does not require employers to offer those tests. But the board overseeing the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, known as Cal/OSHA, on Thursday approved emergency safety rules that are soon likely to require the state’s employers to provide Covid testing to all workers exposed to an outbreak on the job at no cost to the employees. Testing must be repeated a week later, followed by periodic testing.”

Slate: Employers Are Sick of the Pandemic. Employees Are Paying the Price.

Slate: Employers Are Sick of the Pandemic. Employees Are Paying the Price.. “As an unsettling number of people have started ignoring public health guidance because they’re tired of restricting their behavior, employers too are increasingly relaxing their own practices even though the coronavirus continues to surge in many parts of the country. Employers are embracing the same magical thinking so many individuals are—we’re ready for it to be over, so we’ll just act as if it is—often at great expense to their workers.”

Coronavirus training by text message: How some companies are keeping workers informed (CNN)

CNN: Coronavirus training by text message: How some companies are keeping workers informed. “For the past three years, Hello Alfred has partnered with residential buildings to provide a concierge-like service for residents. But on Wednesday, the company announced it is allowing people, regardless of what building they live in, to use its service for food and essential goods deliveries in more than 20 US cities. Unlike many other delivery services, its workers, called ‘Alfreds,’ are employees who receive health benefits, sick leave, and more. The company is providing workers with masks, gloves and hand sanitizer, but it wanted to do more. That meant getting relevant information about coronavirus into the hands of its workers in an easy-to-use way to help protect them.”

Vice: Whole Foods Employees Are Staging a Nationwide ‘Sick-Out’

Vice: Whole Foods Employees Are Staging a Nationwide ‘Sick-Out’. “Whole Foods employees are planning to strike on Tuesday to protest the lack of protections offered to workers during the coronavirus pandemic—the first national collective action led by workers at the company since it was founded in 1980. On March 31, Whole Foods employees will call in sick to demand paid leave for all workers who stay home or self-quarantine during the crisis, free coronavirus testing for all employees, and hazard pay of double the current hourly wage for employees who show up to work during the pandemic.”

Chicago Tribune: Are you getting paid for that Instagram post? Companies tap employees to spread more ‘authentic’ message online.

Chicago Tribune: Are you getting paid for that Instagram post? Companies tap employees to spread more ‘authentic’ message online.. “Most major companies already have a presence on social media. Many partner with professional influencers hired for their audience. But some are now trying to add their own employees to the mix, whether they’re trying to attract customers, recruit new hires or just boost a brand’s image.”

The New York Times: Facebook Gives Workers a Chatbot to Appease That Prying Uncle

The New York Times: Facebook Gives Workers a Chatbot to Appease That Prying Uncle. “Some Facebook employees recently told their managers that they were concerned about answering difficult questions about their workplace from friends and family over the holidays…So just before Thanksgiving, Facebook rolled out something to help its workers: a chatbot that would teach them official company answers for dealing with such thorny questions.” This is so on-brand I laughed out loud.

BuzzFeed News: A Google Staffer Helped Sell Trump’s Family Separation Policy, Despite The Company Denials

BuzzFeed News: A Google Staffer Helped Sell Trump’s Family Separation Policy, Despite The Company Denials. “Google executives misled their own employees last week when they said a former top Department of Homeland Security official who had recently joined the company was ‘not involved in the family separation policy,’ government emails obtained under the Freedom of Information Act reveal.”