National Law Review: State of California Releases New Employer Portal to Assist With COVID-19 Compliance

National Law Review: State of California Releases New Employer Portal to Assist With COVID-19 Compliance. “As the state of California approaches one year of being under various shelter-in-place orders, the Labor & Workforce Development Agency and the Department of Industrial Relations have consolidated resources for employers into a new website. The site provides information on how to ensure a safer and healthier workplace. It also has information on handling employees who may be sick or exposed to COVID-19 in the form of an FAQ.”

Route Fifty: Why Employers Find It So Hard to Test for Covid

Route Fifty: Why Employers Find It So Hard to Test for Covid. “The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued guidance to employers to include Covid testing, and it advised that people working in close quarters be tested periodically. However, the federal government does not require employers to offer those tests. But the board overseeing the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, known as Cal/OSHA, on Thursday approved emergency safety rules that are soon likely to require the state’s employers to provide Covid testing to all workers exposed to an outbreak on the job at no cost to the employees. Testing must be repeated a week later, followed by periodic testing.”

Opinion: Are employers using the pandemic as cover to shed older workers? (MarketWatch)

MarketWatch: Opinion: Are employers using the pandemic as cover to shed older workers?. “The labor market has never been easy for older Americans, and now there is fresh evidence that the COVID-19 crisis is making it even worse. A new report by the Retirement Equity Lab, part of the Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis at New York City-based The New School, says that unemployment rates for workers 55 and older has topped those of mid-career workers for the entire length of the pandemic. It’s the first time since 1973 that such a gap has existed for six months or longer.”

Daily Report (Law .com): Regulating Off-Duty Social Media Activity Poses Conflicting Obligations

Daily Report (Law .com): Regulating Off-Duty Social Media Activity Poses Conflicting Obligations. “With work bleeding into life more than ever (and vice versa), one issue commonly facing employers today is how to regulate off-duty social media comments made by employees that negatively impact the workplace. When employers learn of such conduct, they may be tempted to take adverse action against the offending employee(s). Depending on the nature of the comment, however, this may lead to legal liability. On the other hand, employers may be liable for not taking adverse action against employees for their social media activities, such as in the case of harassment. This article provides a high-level overview of these seemingly conflicting obligations and advice on how to navigate them.”

‘You Probably Want to Know Less’: The Influence of Social Media on Labor Law (Legaltech News)

Legaltech News: ‘You Probably Want to Know Less’: The Influence of Social Media on Labor Law. “The influence of social media in hiring is among the emerging issues that are presenting new questions for employers. Labor and employment attorneys on Wednesday discussed the pitfalls, benefits and gray areas stemming from technology and social media use by workers. ‘Technology is racing way ahead of legal developments and the law is trying to keep up,’ said Charles Fournier, a partner at Curley, Hurtgen & Johnsrud in New York.”

New age discrim row: Accenture, Facebook sued by sales boss for favoring ‘new blood’ (The Register)

The Register: New age discrim row: Accenture, Facebook sued by sales boss for favoring ‘new blood’ . “In January 2016, then-54-year-old Mark Stephens was recruited by Accenture to work as a sales development manager on a project with Facebook, subject to Facebook’s approval. He got the job – and then lost it due to age discrimination, or so he claims in a lawsuit filed against the two companies in Austin, Texas, on Monday.”

PR Newswire: Formal Social Media Evaluations are Latest Job Disqualifier (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Formal Social Media Evaluations are Latest Job Disqualifier (PRESS RELEASE). “Drug testing, background or credit checks used to be factors that could disqualify an otherwise great candidate. Now companies are adding formal social media evaluations to the list, according to new data from the 2018 MRINetwork Reputation Management Study. Gone are the days of employers casually reviewing social media to assess prospective hires, and candidates are catching on.”

WVLT: Vermont law bans employers from reviewing social media accounts of workers

WVLT: Vermont law bans employers from reviewing social media accounts of workers. “A new law in Vermont that went into effect on New Year’s Day bans employers from asking for the social media passwords of workers. Employers will also not be able to review private accounts at all, WCAX reports. Champlain College Professor Elaine Young has been studying social media use for years. She says employers checking accounts isn’t unusual.”

TechCrunch: Google faces revised gender-pay lawsuit

TechCrunch: Google faces revised gender-pay lawsuit. “Google is facing a revised gender-pay class-action lawsuit that alleges Google underpaid women in comparison with their male counterparts and asked new hires about their prior salaries, The Guardian first reported. The revised lawsuit also adds a fourth complainant, Heidi Lamar, who was a teacher at Google’s Children Center in Palo Alto for four years.”

The Guardian: Google refuses legal request to share pay records in gender discrimination case

The Guardian: Google refuses legal request to share pay records in gender discrimination case. “Google is resisting a legal request to disclose salary records in a class-action gender discrimination lawsuit, marking the technology company’s latest efforts to prevent scrutiny of how much it pays its female employees. Google attorneys argued in court on Friday that a judge should block a suit brought by former employees alleging systematic pay disparities on behalf of all women at the company. The company is also arguing that it should not have to provide information on the salaries of men and women or disclose wage policy documents until a first ruling on the class-action status.”

Women say they quit Google because of racial discrimination: ‘I was invisible’ (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Women say they quit Google because of racial discrimination: ‘I was invisible’. “Despite Google’s notoriously strict confidentiality policies, which some say are used to intimidate and silence critics, several former and current employees spoke in interviews about the ways in which they believe minorities, particularly women of color, are denied opportunities and equal pay. They described a culture that tolerates racism and sexism, where white male managers frequently support and promote employees who look like themselves.”

The Verge: An internal Google email shows how the company cracks down on leaks

The Verge: An internal Google email shows how the company cracks down on leaks. “Google is facing a lawsuit in San Francisco Superior Court alleging that the company has fostered a culture of secrecy and fear. Leaks to the media are forbidden, and employees are encouraged to monitor their colleagues for leaks, according to the suit, which was filed in December by an anonymous ex-employee who claims they were unjustly fired.”

State of South Dakota Launches New Jobs Site

The state of South Dakota has launched a new jobs site. “The new software searches the internet to ‘scrape’ job listings from other South Dakota employer sites. We are no longer limited to data listed only by employers who use our system. The system also details both job titles and needed skills, allowing any user easily to identify skill supply and demand information in real-time. We can now view, at any given time, everything from the most in-demand skills for job listings to the education level of current job seekers to occupational wage data.”