MakeUseOf: 5 Apps and Tools to Organize Your Job Search

MakeUseOf: 5 Apps and Tools to Organize Your Job Search. “There is a palpable fear among working professionals. Artificial intelligence is getting better every day, and smart technology is making human jobs redundant. What happens when robots can do all jobs? Even if you are already employed, it’s a good idea to have a backup — organize a job search before it’s too late.”

State of South Dakota Launches New Jobs Site

The state of South Dakota has launched a new jobs site. “The new software searches the internet to ‘scrape’ job listings from other South Dakota employer sites. We are no longer limited to data listed only by employers who use our system. The system also details both job titles and needed skills, allowing any user easily to identify skill supply and demand information in real-time. We can now view, at any given time, everything from the most in-demand skills for job listings to the education level of current job seekers to occupational wage data.”

TechCrunch: Google to launch a jobs search engine in the U.S.

TechCrunch: Google to launch a jobs search engine in the U.S.. “Google announced today it’s launching a jobs search engine in the U.S. The service will focus on all types of jobs – from entry-level and service industry positions to high-end professional jobs. It will also leverage Google technologies like machine learning and A.I. to better understand how jobs are classified and related, among other things.” The way TechCrunch is describing it, it sounds more like specialized metasearch than anything else.

Fast Company: How To Mine The Internet For Hidden Clues About A Potential Job Offer

Fast Company: How To Mine The Internet For Hidden Clues About A Potential Job Offer. “To make sure you know what you are getting into before you start, you could simply log on to Glassdoor and ask around, or you could go full-on sleuth and employ some next-level investigation in your research. Ken Sawka, CEO and founder of corporate intelligence firm Fuld + Company, says that gathering and analyzing the right information can potentially save you from a bad job decision.” Nice overview.

Facebook: leaking info about gender bias damages our ‘recruiting brand’ (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Facebook: leaking info about gender bias damages our ‘recruiting brand’. “Facebook is disputing a former employee’s analysis that female engineers have their code rejected 35% more than male engineers, telling employees internally that leaking such information damages its ‘recruiting brand’ and makes it harder for the company to hire women.” Good grief.

PRN: Progressives for Immigration Reform Unveils online database of H1-B Visas for Immigration Activists and Legislators (PRESS RELEASE)

PRNewswire: Progressives for Immigration Reform Unveils online database of H1-B Visas for Immigration Activists and Legislators (PRESS RELEASE). “This online database will quickly and efficiently search hundreds of thousands of Department of Labor records and deliver an impressive array of search results free of charge to the user. For instance, the user can find out the number of H-1B Visa applications in a given locale by searching a state, city, zip code and/or congressional district. Further, searches of this database will deliver individual as well as aggregate salary information for each application, dates when American citizens will no longer be blocked from holding positions, skill levels, job titles, employers, prevailing wage data, and much more. “

NCSU: The Brave New World of Social Media Screening for New Hires

NCSU: The Brave New World of Social Media Screening for New Hires. “As social media has proliferated, employers have increasingly been using online information to evaluate job candidates. Recent survey data suggest that 43 percent of organizations screen job candidates by using social media or online search engines. In some cases, employers require that applicants provide passwords to their social media profiles to allow for easier viewing. Despite the increasing use of these hiring practices, relatively little is known about them. What kinds of information are recruiters looking for and where do they look for it? What kinds of guidelines do they follow to protect the privacy of job applicants and to guard against bias?”