BuzzFeed News: Americans Are Overworked And Over Work

BuzzFeed News: Americans Are Overworked And Over Work. “In a mass exit dubbed the ‘Great Resignation’ by psychologist Anthony Klotz, nearly 4 million people left jobs this past June, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey. Another 4 million left in July, the fourth consecutive month of such high departure rates. In August, 4.3 million people left their jobs, a record number, according to CNBC. Labor economist Julia Pollak, who works for ZipRecruiter, told me that in normal times, ‘there are typically 3.5 million people quitting a job any month … That’s a substantially higher number, and employers are really feeling it.’ Karin Kimbrough, chief economist at LinkedIn, told me in a recent interview that the “social contract [of] work is being rewritten,” and the balance of power that exists between employer and employee “is shifting towards the worker.””

International Labour Organization: ILO launches new online database on employment policies and strategies to promote an inclusive job-rich recovery

International Labour Organization: ILO launches new online database on employment policies and strategies to promote an inclusive job-rich recovery. “Aimed at governments, social partners, research institutions, practitioners and other development stakeholders, the Employment Policy Gateway enables users to search existing national policies and strategies for employment promotion by region, country and themes. This allows comparisons of national policies across countries and supports research and analysis on existing policy instruments.”

Axios: Unruly customers threaten economic recovery

Axios: Unruly customers threaten economic recovery. “The pace of the economic recovery hinges in part on workers returning to jobs that involve dealing with an unpredictable public. But many of those workers say increasingly combative customers — angry about everything from long wait times to mask mandates — have prompted them to quit.”

CNET: Laid off for refusing a vaccination mandate: Can you still collect unemployment?

CNET: Laid off for refusing a vaccination mandate: Can you still collect unemployment?. “At the outset, we’ll note that this is an evolving legal issue that’s likely to play out in the courts. As a general rule, employees who resign or are fired for refusing a COVID-19 vaccine are not eligible to collect unemployment. And some legal experts believe that resisting a vaccine mandate could be treated as equivalent to a voluntary resignation, which would disqualify an employee from receiving benefits. But the rules vary by region and employer. Despite a few federally recognized exceptions, most states have not yet officially weighed in on the matter.”

Report: Cultural institutions took federal money but still let go of workers (American Federation of State, County & Municipal Employees)

American Federation of State, County & Municipal Employees: Report: Cultural institutions took federal money but still let go of workers. “Some of the nation’s largest cultural institutions accepted more than $1.6 billion in federal help to weather the coronavirus pandemic, but continued to let go of workers – even though the assistance was meant to shore up payrolls and keep workers on the job, according to a report released by AFSCME Cultural Workers United.”

YouTube study: ‘Creator economy’ supports equivalent of 394,000 full-time US jobs (CNET)

CNET: YouTube study: ‘Creator economy’ supports equivalent of 394,000 full-time US jobs. “YouTube released a study Wednesday saying that the “creator economy” spurred by its massive video service supports the equivalent of 394,000 full-time jobs in the US and contributed $20.5 billion to the US gross domestic product last year. The study, conducted by independent advisory firm Oxford Economics, was commissioned and paid for by YouTube.”

Washington Post: During the ‘Great Resignation,’ workers refuse to accept the unacceptable

Washington Post: During the ‘Great Resignation,’ workers refuse to accept the unacceptable. “In a recent Washington Post Live webcast, Anthony Klotz, an associate professor of management at Texas A&M University credited with coining the term the ‘Great Resignation,’ attributed the departures to four main causes: a backlog of workers who wanted to resign before the pandemic but held on a bit longer; burnout, particularly among frontline workers in health care, food service and retail; ‘pandemic epiphanies’ in which people experienced major shifts in identity and purpose that led them to pursue new careers and start their own businesses; and an aversion to returning to offices after a year or more of working remotely.”

The Verge: Automated hiring software is mistakenly rejecting millions of viable job candidates

The Verge: Automated hiring software is mistakenly rejecting millions of viable job candidates. “Automated resume-scanning software is contributing to a ‘broken’ hiring system in the US, says a new report from Harvard Business School. Such software is used by employers to filter job applicants, but is mistakenly rejecting millions of viable candidates, say the study’s authors. It’s contributing to the problem of ‘hidden workers’ — individuals who are able and willing to work, but remain locked out of jobs by structural problems in the labor market.”

The Register: ‘It takes a hell of a mental toll’ – techies who lost work due to COVID share their stories

The Register: ‘It takes a hell of a mental toll’ – techies who lost work due to COVID share their stories. “Pat Christensen’s* COVID layoff came earlier in 2020, and at an earlier point in his career. As the year commenced, Christensen worked in New York State as a developer at a software vendor that was stretching towards security products. As the COVID-19 pandemic gathered pace in February and March, Christensen was promoted into a new role designed to help make that stretch – and was thrilled at the chance to move his career towards security. In May, the axe fell.”

Associated Press: Do we need humans for that job? Automation booms after COVID

Associated Press: Do we need humans for that job? Automation booms after COVID. “The pandemic didn’t just threaten Americans’ health when it slammed the U.S. in 2020—it may also have posed a long-term threat to many of their jobs. Faced with worker shortages and higher labor costs, companies are starting to automate service sector jobs that economists once considered safe, assuming that machines couldn’t easily provide the human contact they believed customers would demand.”

University of Maryland: Pitfalls of the TikTok Resume Trend

University of Maryland: Pitfalls of the TikTok Resume Trend . “Employers who use TikTok, Facebook, Twitter or other social networks to evaluate job candidates run certain risks, including overlooking potentially strong non-video savvy applicants or unwittingly succumbing to bias, Stevens says. Social media profiles and TikTok resumes almost always include user images, which can reveal the candidate’s age, race, weight and level of attractiveness – factors that are more easily obscured in a resume.”

Route Fifty: Business Travel Isn’t Bouncing Back

Route Fifty: Business Travel Isn’t Bouncing Back. “U.S. business travelers are scaling back travel plans amid rising Covid-19 cases, according to a national survey conducted for the American Hotel & Lodging Association. The survey found that 67% of business travelers surveyed are planning to take fewer trips, 52% are likely to cancel existing travel plans without rescheduling, and 60% are planning to postpone travel plans.”