Recession With a Difference: Women Face Special Burden (New York Times)

New York Times: Recession With a Difference: Women Face Special Burden. “For millions of working women, the coronavirus pandemic has delivered a rare and ruinous one-two-three punch. First, the parts of the economy that were smacked hardest and earliest by job losses were ones where women dominate — restaurants, retail businesses and health care. Then a second wave began taking out local and state government jobs, another area where women outnumber men. The third blow has, for many, been the knockout: the closing of child care centers and the shift to remote schooling.”

Exclusive: Coronavirus stalls nearly a third of promotions (City A.M.)

City A.M.: Exclusive: Coronavirus stalls nearly a third of promotions. “Some 28% of full time workers were due a promotion in 2020 that has been put on hold due to the coronavirus pandemic, exclusive research has revealed. The research found more than a third (36%) of full-time workers felt their professional development had regressed due to the coronavirus pandemic.”

Coronavirus crisis: More than $7.2 billion in unemployment compensation paid out to Ohioans in last 34 weeks (Cleveland 19 News)

Cleveland 19 News: Coronavirus crisis: More than $7.2 billion in unemployment compensation paid out to Ohioans in last 34 weeks. “The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services reported 21,868 people filed for initial unemployment last week (Nov. 1-7) to the U.S. Department of Labor, which brings the total of unemployment claims filed in Ohio over the last 34 weeks to 1,850,676.”

Becker’s Spine Review: 148 employers post more than 500 orthopedic positions on new website

Becker’s Spine Review: 148 employers post more than 500 orthopedic positions on new website. “The website was created by The Academic Orthopaedic Consortium in response to residents’ and fellows’ frustrations identifying jobs. It launched Nov. 2. The consortium’s membership base includes 140 university-based orthopedic programs, whose 2,700 members comprise orthopedic chairs, division chiefs, chief administrative officers, and 2,000 residents and fellows. The organization also has ties to more than 700 private orthopedic practices.”

Working from home during COVID-19: What do employees really want? (The Conversation)

The Conversation: Working from home during COVID-19: What do employees really want?. “We studied 11,000 employees in Canadian and Australian universities through an online survey. In both countries, most universities shifted much of their work online earlier this year. These are our preliminary results about employee experiences. It’s a mixed picture, but it tells us that a lot of change is ahead and that workers should be part of the discussion about how their workplaces respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.”

My Journal Courier: Pandemic side gigs take hustle

My Journal Courier: Pandemic side gigs take hustle. “Side gig. Side job. Side hustle. It goes by many names and serves many purposes. For some, it’s a way to keep the lights on. For others, it’s an opportunity to save for a goal or follow a passion. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of Americans have become unemployed. Many are turning to the gig economy to make money. And it’s booming.”

BuzzFeed News: The Coronavirus Is Pushing Women Out Of Work And Away From Trump

BuzzFeed News: The Coronavirus Is Pushing Women Out Of Work And Away From Trump. “Across the country, the coronavirus pandemic has disproportionately driven women out of the workforce — hitting female-dominated industries like Higgins’s or forcing couples to choose between higher and lower wage earners in order to provide childcare.”

Politico: How coronavirus is reshaping America’s job market

Politico: How coronavirus is reshaping America’s job market. “Just two-thirds of Americans were working for the same employer in September as they were in February, with the rest either landing new jobs or unemployed, according to the Real-Time Population Survey, a collaboration between researchers at Arizona State University and Virginia Commonwealth University. Brookings Institution researchers paint an even grimmer long-term picture, estimating that 42 percent of jobs lost due to Covid-19 will eventually be gone for good. Incomes are also dropping, indicating that many of these workers are transitioning into lower-paying jobs. More than 25 percent of U.S. workers earned less in September than they did in February, according to the Population Survey.”

New York Times: Out of Work in America

New York Times: Out of Work in America. “A conference call in which everyone on the line was laid off. An email declaring that a restaurant had served its last meal. A phone call from the boss before work saying to come in — and pack up all your things. In March and April, as the coronavirus began tearing through the country, Americans lost as many jobs as they did during the Great Depression and the Great Recession combined — 22 million jobs that were there one minute and gone the next. A job is a paycheck, an identity, a civic stabilizer, a future builder. During a pandemic, a job loss erases all that, when it is needed the most.”

Opinion: Are employers using the pandemic as cover to shed older workers? (MarketWatch)

MarketWatch: Opinion: Are employers using the pandemic as cover to shed older workers?. “The labor market has never been easy for older Americans, and now there is fresh evidence that the COVID-19 crisis is making it even worse. A new report by the Retirement Equity Lab, part of the Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis at New York City-based The New School, says that unemployment rates for workers 55 and older has topped those of mid-career workers for the entire length of the pandemic. It’s the first time since 1973 that such a gap has existed for six months or longer.”

USA Today: LinkedIn’s new tool helps users make a career change through overlapping skills

USA Today: LinkedIn’s new tool helps users make a career change through overlapping skills. “LinkedIn launched a new tool aimed towards helping recently unemployed Americans make a career change. The business social network unveiled the Career Explorer feature, which displays careers job seekers can transition into by finding skills that overlap with their previous jobs. The tool ranks the skills in order of importance depending on the job position.”

KVVU: Nevada Resilience Project launches website to provide resources for coping with COVID-19

KVVU: Nevada Resilience Project launches website to provide resources for coping with COVID-19. “The Nevada Resilience Project announced the launch of a new website Wednesday to help people manage the impacts of COVID-19. NRP was created to help build coping strategies for those experiencing stress or anxiety with COVID-19, the group said in a press release. The website… will list resources and information related to job loss, housing insecurity, isolation or healthcare challenges.”

New York Times: Jobless Workers Built Up Some Savings. Then the $600 Checks Stopped.

New York Times: Jobless Workers Built Up Some Savings. Then the $600 Checks Stopped.. “The $600 weekly unemployment benefit the federal government funded this year was a remarkably effective expansion of the safety net. It helped pay many workers more than their lost wages. It enabled families to spend more than during normal times. It even allowed households to put away savings as the economy was teetering. Then the money stopped at the end of July. And it’s clear, looking back, what happened next: Workers quickly burned through the reserves that the aid had given them.”

Phys .org: Asian Americans more affected by pandemic-related unemployment than any other racial group

Phys .org: Asian Americans more affected by pandemic-related unemployment than any other racial group. “While the lockdown associated with COVID-19 has negatively affected people from all walks of life, one U.S. minority group is bearing the brunt of unemployment. According to a new study by a quartet of University of Kansas researchers, the pandemic’s effect on the labor market has hit Asian Americans the hardest.”