MIT Technology Review: Facebook’s ad algorithms are still excluding women from seeing jobs

MIT Technology Review: Facebook’s ad algorithms are still excluding women from seeing jobs. “Facebook is withholding certain job ads from women because of their gender, according to the latest audit of its ad service. The audit, conducted by independent researchers at the University of Southern California (USC), reveals that Facebook’s ad-delivery system shows different job ads to women and men even though the jobs require the same qualifications. This is considered sex-based discrimination under US equal employment opportunity law, which bans ad targeting based on protected characteristics. The findings come despite years of advocacy and lawsuits, and after promises from Facebook to overhaul how it delivers ads.”

NBC News: U.S. economy added 916,000 jobs in March, as vaccinations spur return to normal

NBC News: U.S. economy added 916,000 jobs in March, as vaccinations spur return to normal. “The U.S. economy added 916,000 jobs last month and the unemployment rate fell to 6 percent, in the strongest indication yet that the labor market is finally working its way back to pre-pandemic norms as the number of vaccinations continues to rise. The hiring and employment data, released Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, firmly beat economists’ predictions of 675,000 positions added. Totals were revised upward for January by 67,000 to 233,000 positions and for February by 89,000 to 468,000.”

KPAX: New statewide website highlights earn-while-you-learn opportunities for young adults

KPAX: New statewide website highlights earn-while-you-learn opportunities for young adults. “Too often, we see young adults leaving the great state of Montana to work somewhere else in the region or the country, and when that happens, Montana’s workforce suffers. Through a collaborative effort between the Missoula Chamber of Commerce and the Montana Department of Labor, Montana’s workforce is gaining some traction through a new website.”

Route Fifty: U.S. Unemployment Claims Fall to Under 700,000, Lowest Since Pandemic

Route Fifty: U.S. Unemployment Claims Fall to Under 700,000, Lowest Since Pandemic. “Claims fell to 684,000 for the week ending March 20, a drop of 97,000 from the previous week and the first time that claims have dipped below 700,000 since the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic last year. Applications had never totaled above 700,000 before then, according to federal data. The previous record was 695,000, in October 1982.”

CNN: The ‘benefit year end’: A tough Covid anniversary for the unemployed

CNN: The ‘benefit year end’: A tough Covid anniversary for the unemployed. “Unhappy anniversary, jobless Americans. This week marks a year since the coronavirus pandemic began upending the US economy, costing millions of people their jobs and forcing them onto unemployment benefits. Those who are still out of work could soon start getting notices from their state unemployment agencies advising them that they are approaching their benefit year end date — which happens 52 weeks after an initial claim is filed.”

The Impact of Coronavirus on US Job Postings Through March 12: Data from Indeed.com (Indeed Hiring Lab)

Indeed Hiring Lab: The Impact of Coronavirus on US Job Postings Through March 12: Data from Indeed.com. “Job postings on Indeed are a real-time measure of labor market activity. On March 12, 2021, they were 8.6% above February 1, 2020, the pre-pandemic baseline, after adjusting for seasonal variation. That’s a notable gain from a week earlier, when postings were 6.7% above the baseline. Postings improved over the past week at a faster rate than during the summer 2020 rebound, when postings rose by an average of 1.6 percentage points per week.”

COVID economy: Job losses jolt Bay Area, California in January (East Bay Times)

East Bay Times: COVID economy: Job losses jolt Bay Area, California in January. “Job losses continued to jolt the Bay Area and California during January, according to a new report Friday that also revealed that the coronavirus dealt a harsher economic blow to the region and state than first estimated. The Bay Area lost 4,800 jobs during January, with the South Bay and the San Francisco-San Mateo region suffering the biggest declines. The East Bay and Marin County were bright spots with sturdy job gains, according to the report from the state Employment Development Department. Overall, California lost 69,900 jobs.”

The Tribune: State unveils Hoosier Talent Network job search site

The Tribune: State unveils Hoosier Talent Network job search site. “Hoosiers who are out of work due to the COVID-19 pandemic or simply looking for a job change now have a new online employment platform to help guide their career choices. The Indiana Department of Workforce Development has unveiled the Hoosier Talent Network from Eightfold AI to connect employers with workers disrupted by the coronavirus outbreak.”

Axios: The long road to putting America back to work

Axios: The long road to putting America back to work. “One year into the pandemic, more than 10 million Americans are still out of work — and many of the jobs they lost won’t even exist when this is over. The big picture: Putting the country back to work will require vast amounts of retraining and career shifting, as former bartenders learn to code and former cruise ship workers look for jobs at data centers. The U.S. is still unprepared to take that on at scale.”

Washington Post: A Trader Joe’s employee called for stronger coronavirus measures. The company fired him.

Washington Post: A Trader Joe’s employee called for stronger coronavirus measures. The company fired him.. “In a letter citing a medical journal and experts who study respiratory transmission of the coronavirus, Ben Bonnema called on the grocery chain’s head, Dan Bane, to adopt more stringent safety protocols. Among his requests: improving filtration, requiring masks without exception and adopting a ‘three-strikes’ policy for removing uncooperative customers from stores. ‘We put our lives on the line everyday by showing up to work,’ wrote Bonnema, who was a crew member at a New York location. ‘Please, show up for us by adopting these policies.’ The company responded soon after, he says. It fired him.”

Krebs on Security: How $100M in Jobless Claims Went to Inmates

Krebs on Security: How $100M in Jobless Claims Went to Inmates. “The U.S. Labor Department’s inspector general said this week that roughly $100 million in fraudulent unemployment insurance claims were paid in 2020 to criminals who are already in jail. That’s a tiny share of the estimated tens of billions of dollars in jobless benefits states have given to identity thieves in the past year. To help reverse that trend, many states are now turning to a little-known private company called ID.me. This post examines some of what that company is seeing in its efforts to stymie unemployment fraud.”