At risk of losing their home, health, and internet: 12 million Americans still waiting for unemployment benefits (NBC News)

NBC News: At risk of losing their home, health, and internet: 12 million Americans still waiting for unemployment benefits. “Six months into the pandemic, some laid-off workers find themselves waiting weeks or even months to receive their unemployment benefits. States blame antiquated technology and say their staffers can’t keep up with the continued surge of claims, while worker advocates say these are just excuses for mismanagement and a failure to prioritize funding for upgrades. As this plays out, an untold number of families are hanging on by a financial thread.”

New Republic: My 98 Days in Unemployment Purgatory

New Republic: My 98 Days in Unemployment Purgatory. “My claim seemed clear-cut: I was laid off from a full-time W-2 job, with regular pay stubs, because of the Covid-19 recession. I was also coming from a union job, which meant that I had lawyers and union staff to help me with the application process. I was out of work, but I was lucky. But what followed—a summer spent plumbing the cursed depths of unemployment rules—quickly tested that premise.”

Carolina Public Press: Many NC employers, jobs not coming back when pandemic ends

Carolina Public Press: Many NC employers, jobs not coming back when pandemic ends. “North Carolina’s unemployment rate peaked at 12.9% in April. Though it dropped to 7.5% in June, it ticked up a percentage point in July, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Many of the missing jobs are in the service industry — and those whose work requires face-to-face contact are suffering the most.”

Phys .org: Amazon survey finds more than half of US workers say coronavirus has left them underemployed

Phys .org: Amazon survey finds more than half of US workers say coronavirus has left them underemployed. “More than half of the U.S. workers seeking work say their job hunt is due to the coronavirus pandemic. That’s a key finding of a new survey by e-commerce giant Amazon, which found that a quarter of U.S. workers are looking for new employment, while 27% say that at least some of their skills won’t be of use in the job market in the next five years.”

Analysis: More People Got Back to Work in August, but Outlook Dims for Those Still Looking for Jobs (Morning Consult)

Morning Consult: Analysis: More People Got Back to Work in August, but Outlook Dims for Those Still Looking for Jobs. “Recent improvements in the demand for labor are creating two distinct employment paths as the economy recovers. On the one hand, a growing share of workers who are now back to work feels secure in their jobs and does not expect to suffer a loss of employment income over the next four weeks. On the other hand, unemployed workers are losing hope of returning to their prior jobs, and 50% of unemployment insurance recipients are unable to cover their basic expenses with the money they receive from UI benefits.”

COVID creates a new job: temperature taker (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: COVID creates a new job: temperature taker. “Among the byproducts of the COVID economy is a brand new job: temperature taker. While some organizations are able to use security guards or receptionists to take care of the task, others are hiring specifically for dedicated temperature takers or health screeners. By mid-May, the employment website Glassdoor reported 600 listings nationwide for temperature checkers.”

AP: Child care crisis pushes US mothers out of the labor force

AP: Child care crisis pushes US mothers out of the labor force. “Research is increasingly pointing to a retreat of working mothers from the U.S. labor force as the pandemic leaves parents with few child care options and the added burden of navigating distance learning. The trend threatens the financial stability of families in the near-term. In the long-term, the crisis could stall — if not reverse — decades of hard-fought gains by working women who are still far from achieving labor force parity with men.”

Washington Post: The unemployed are taking their struggles to Reddit, a ‘beacon of light in this long dark night’

Washington Post: The unemployed are taking their struggles to Reddit, a ‘beacon of light in this long dark night’. “Users join the subreddit for different reasons. Some have questions. Some are desperate. Some want to help. Some have nowhere else to turn. Many will start their post’s title with their state name, to help localize the discussion. Multiple users stressed that r/unemployment proved the only place they could find reasonable advice on navigating the unsolvable maze of bureaucracy. A striking aspect of the subreddit is how it brings people together regardless of their politics — an anomaly in our divided America. Unemployment has a tendency to wash away differences. Socialists, libertarians and everyone in between fill the discussion, and everyone gets something slightly different out of it.”

A growing side effect of the pandemic: Permanent job loss (Politico)

Politico: A growing side effect of the pandemic: Permanent job loss. “Permanent losses have so far made up only a fraction of the jobs that have vanished since states began shutting down their economies in March, with the vast majority of unemployed workers classified as on temporary layoff. But those numbers are steadily increasing — reaching 2.9 million in June — as companies start to move from temporary layoffs to permanent cuts.”

CNN: Unemployment claims rise for second week in a row

CNN: Unemployment claims rise for second week in a row. “In yet another sign that the economic recovery is teetering in a resurgence of coronavirus cases, the number of Americans filing first-time unemployment claims rose for the second week in a row. Some 1.4 million people filed for initial jobless claims last week, up 12,000 from the prior week’s revised level, which was the first increase in 16 weeks, according to the Department of Labor.”

Washington Post: Ten bucks left, no place to go: How the pandemic and a broken unemployment system are upending people’s lives

Washington Post: Ten bucks left, no place to go: How the pandemic and a broken unemployment system are upending people’s lives. “The pandemic crept up on Lakeisha Rollins one text at a time. When the coronavirus hit the District in March, the 30-year-old was working at the Whole Foods Market on P Street NW, pulling items off shelves to fill online orders. Rollins, who is studying to become a nursing assistant, got a message that one of her co-workers had tested positive. The next day, another text alerted her about another positive employee. By April, six workers at the store had contracted the virus.”

Yale News: Yale study finds expanded jobless benefits did not reduce employment

Yale News: Yale study finds expanded jobless benefits did not reduce employment. “A new report by Yale economists finds no evidence that the enhanced jobless benefits Congress authorized in March in response to the COVID-19 pandemic reduced employment. The report (PDF) addresses concerns that the more generous unemployment benefits, which provide $600 per week above state unemployment insurance payments, would disincentivize work.”

Crain’s Detroit Business: New digital hub to help Michigan workers displaced by pandemic boost skills

Crain’s Detroit Business: New digital hub to help Michigan workers displaced by pandemic boost skills. “A new digital hub offers online learning opportunities and other training resources for Michigan residents looking to return to work or learn new skills. The coronavirus crisis has created record unemployment in Michigan and across the country. The Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity says workers who possess advanced skills will be better positioned to get and keep higher-paying and more stable jobs.”