A Calculated Move: Calculators Now Emulated at Internet Archive (Internet Archive Blog)

Internet Archive Blog: A Calculated Move: Calculators Now Emulated at Internet Archive. “While we have an excellent family of emulators assisting MAME in making programs work in the browser, the vast majority of the items in our Internet Arcade (and Turbo Edition), Console Living Room, and Handheld History collections mostly have MAME to thank. And now another can as well: The Calculator Drawer.”

Slashgear: Flash videos and games are resurrected by Ruffles emulator

Slashgear: Flash videos and games are resurrected by Ruffles emulator. “Once the darling of the young Web, Flash eventually became a liability because of its gaping security holes and heavy resource usage. But for all the flack it has received, it’s hard to deny the amount of legitimate and noteworthy content produced using flash, particularly 2D animations and games. To make sure those are never lost forever, one developer has taken upon the rather grueling task of creating Ruffles, the open source WebAssembly Flash emulator.”

Internet Archive: Some Very Entertaining Plastic, Emulated at the Archive

Internet Archive: Some Very Entertaining Plastic, Emulated at the Archive. “It’s been a little over 4 years since the Internet Archive started providing emulation in the browser from our software collection; millions of plays of games, utilities, and everything else that shows up on a screen have happened since then. While we continue to refine the technology (including adding Webassembly as an option for running the emulations), we also have tried to expand out to various platforms, computers, and anything else that we can, based on the work of the emulation community, especially the MAME Development Team. For a number of years, the MAME team has been moving towards emulating a class of hardware and software that, for some, stretches the bounds of what emulation can do, and we have now put up a collection of some of their efforts here at archive.org. Introducing the Handheld History Collection.”

Code4Lib: How to Party Like it’s 1999: Emulation for Everyone

Great stuff from Code4Lib: How to Party Like it’s 1999: Emulation for Everyone. “Emulated access of complex media has long been discussed, but there are very few instances in which complex, interactive, born-digital emulations are available to researchers. New York Public Library has made 1980-90’s era video games from 5.25″ floppy disks in the Timothy Leary Papers accessible via a DosBox emulator. These games appear in various stages of development and display the work of at least four of Leary’s collaborators on the games. 56 disk images from the Leary Papers are currently emulated in the reading room.”

You Can Save Games in the MS-DOS Game Archive

Hoo boy. One of the reasons I didn’t get as wound up as most people about the tons of MS-DOS games The Internet Archive added and made available was because the games couldn’t be saved. What’s the point of spending 45 minutes making the perfect bunch of RPG characters when you can’t save the game? Well, now, apparently you can save the game. So if you never see me again, you know why. “Through the work of multiple people, including John Vilk, DFJustin, bai, db48x, and other contributions, the BrowserFS extension that JSMESS/Emularity uses can maintain filesystems across sessions, in the LocalStorage API. It’s been doing this for six months.”