Ars Technica: Scientists hid encryption key for Wizard of Oz text in plastic molecules

Ars Technica: Scientists hid encryption key for Wizard of Oz text in plastic molecules. “Scientists from the University of Texas at Austin sent a letter to colleagues in Massachusetts with a secret message: an encryption key to unlock a text file of L. Frank Baum’s classic novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. The twist: The encryption key was hidden in a special ink laced with polymers.”

Ars Technica: The cryptopocalypse is nigh! NIST rolls out new encryption standards to prepare

Ars Technica: The cryptopocalypse is nigh! NIST rolls out new encryption standards to prepare. “In the not-too-distant future—as little as a decade, perhaps, nobody knows exactly how long—the cryptography protecting your bank transactions, chat messages, and medical records from prying eyes is going to break spectacularly with the advent of quantum computing. On Tuesday, a US government agency named four replacement encryption schemes to head off this cryptopocalypse.”

WIRED: How a Saxophonist Tricked the KGB by Encrypting Secrets in Music

WIRED: How a Saxophonist Tricked the KGB by Encrypting Secrets in Music. “IN 1985, SAXOPHONIST Merryl Goldberg found herself on a plane to Moscow with three fellow musicians from the Boston Klezmer Conservatory Band. She had carefully packed sheet music, reeds, and other woodwind supplies, along with a soprano saxophone, to bring into the USSR. But one of her spiral-bound notebooks, lined with staves for hand-notating music, contained hidden information.”

WIRED: Proton Is Trying to Become Google—Without Your Data

WIRED: Proton Is Trying to Become Google—Without Your Data . “SINCE ITS FOUNDING in 2014, ProtonMail has become synonymous with user-friendly encrypted email. Now the company is trying to be synonymous with a whole lot more. On Wednesday morning, it announced that it’s changing its name to, simply, Proton—a nod at its broader ambitions within the universe of online privacy. The company will now offer an ‘ecosystem’ of linked products, all accessed via one paid subscription.”

‘The Ukrainians Are Listening’: Russia’s Military Radios Are Getting Owned (Foreign Policy)

Foreign Policy: ‘The Ukrainians Are Listening’: Russia’s Military Radios Are Getting Owned. “One European diplomat, speaking on condition of anonymity to speak about recent military intelligence, said the failure of Russia’s encrypted systems has also helped Ukrainian forces drive up the body count among opposing generals. In one striking example, internet sleuths at the investigative outlet Bellingcat discovered Russian reconnaissance officers in the field using unencrypted communications systems to send word of the death of Maj. Gen. Vitaly Gerasimov back home. Gerasimov, believed to be the nephew of Russia’s top military officer, was killed during fighting with Ukrainian forces in Kharkiv in early March.”

CNN: Why WhatsApp wants to convince Americans to stop sending text messages

CNN: Why WhatsApp wants to convince Americans to stop sending text messages. “Data shared with CNN Business by research firm eMarketer indicates WhatsApp had less than 63 million users in the United States as of last year, or around 19% of the country’s population. That’s far behind its audience in countries such as India, Brazil and Indonesia where it is among the most popular modes of communication. India alone has nearly 500 million WhatsApp users according to eMarketer, which is more than a third of its population and over half its internet user base.”

Mashable: Ukrainians turned to encrypted messaging app Signal as Russians invaded

Mashable: Ukrainians turned to encrypted messaging app Signal as Russians invaded. “Facing uncertainty, Ukrainians looked for digital security in the form of the end-to-end encrypted messaging app Signal. That’s according to Matthew Prince, the cofounder and CEO of Cloudflare, whose internet infrastructure company gives him unique insight into what goes on behind the internet’s scenes. In a Thursday tweet, Prince wrote that he observed Signal usage in Ukraine shooting up starting just after midnight on Feb. 24.”