Mashable: Why you should absolutely worry about the anti-privacy EARN IT Act

Mashable: Why you should absolutely worry about the anti-privacy EARN IT Act. “Because the internet is a strange and complicated place, the fate of your digital privacy is, at this very moment, intertwined with that of online message boards and comment sections. And things, we’re sorry to report, aren’t looking so hot. At issue is the seemingly unrelated EARN IT Act. Pushed by Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham and a host of bipartisan co-sponsors, and voted on by the Senate Judiciary Committee last Thursday, the measure ostensibly aims to combat online child sexual abuse material. However, according to privacy and security experts who spoke with Mashable, the bill both directly threatens end-to-end encryption and promises to spur new and sustained online censorship by weakening Section 230 — a provision of the Communication Decency Act of 1996 that protects internet providers from being held liable for their users’ actions.”

TechCrunch: Police roll up crime networks in Europe after infiltrating popular encrypted chat app

TechCrunch: Police roll up crime networks in Europe after infiltrating popular encrypted chat app. “Hundreds of alleged drug dealers and other criminals are in custody today after police in Europe infiltrated an encrypted chat system reportedly used by thousands to discuss illegal operations. The total failure of this ostensibly secure method of communication will likely have a chilling effect on the shadowy industry of crime-focused tech.”

Ubergizmo: US Senators Propose A Bill To End ‘Warrant-Proof’ Encryption

Ubergizmo: US Senators Propose A Bill To End ‘Warrant-Proof’ Encryption. “In the past, companies would have to fight requests from law enforcement agencies whenever they are asked to hand over information about their customers. These days, it has gotten a lot easier in the sense that tech companies are handing the encryption keys over to their customers.”

BetaNews: Zoom relents and agrees to give free users end-to-end encryption

BetaNews: Zoom relents and agrees to give free users end-to-end encryption. “In a blog post [Zoom CEO Eric] Yuan says that the company has ‘identified a path forward that balances the legitimate right of all users to privacy and the safety of users on our platform’. He goes on to explain that this means end-to-end encryption will be offered to everyone as an add-on.”

Digital Inspiration: How to Encrypt and Decrypt Text Strings with JavaScript

Digital Inspiration: How to Encrypt and Decrypt Text Strings with JavaScript. “In one of my web projects, I require simple and easy-to-implement encryption and decryption JavaScript library that could encode a piece of text and then decode the encoded string on the server-side. The easiest option is the base64 encoding scheme that can be easily implemented in both native JavaScript and Google Apps Script.”

Ars Technica: Let’s Encrypt changes course on certificate revocation

Ars Technica: Let’s Encrypt changes course on certificate revocation . “Earlier this week, Let’s Encrypt announced that it would revoke roughly three million—2.6 percent—of its currently active certificates. Last night, however, the organization announced that it would delay the revocation of many of those certificates in the interest of Internet health.”

The Register: Don’t be fooled, experts warn, America’s anti-child-abuse EARN IT Act could burn encryption to the ground

The Register: Don’t be fooled, experts warn, America’s anti-child-abuse EARN IT Act could burn encryption to the ground . “On Thursday, a bipartisan group of US senators introduced legislation with the ostensible purpose of combating child sexual abuse material (CSAM) online – at the apparent cost of encryption.”

Neowin: WhatsApp working on letting you password-protect Google Drive backups

Neowin: WhatsApp working on letting you password-protect Google Drive backups. “WhatsApp currently allows Android users to backup their chat data to Google Drive. However, while WhatsApp chats stored on your device are encrypted, the backups in Google Drive are not. WhatsApp is possibly looking to change that as hints of the company working on password-protecting Drive backups have surfaced. This will be a major win from a security standpoint as it will ensure that your WhatsApp backups stored in Google Drive are also encrypted.”

Neowin: Let’s Encrypt has issued its billionth certificate

Neowin: Let’s Encrypt has issued its billionth certificate. “Let’s Encrypt has announced that its billionth certificate was issued today. By automating the issuance of website certificates, Let’s Encrypt hoped to increase the number of HTTPS-compatible websites, making the web more secure for everyone. The announcement comes just a week after Let’s Encrypt introduced support for multi-perspective domain validation.”

CNET: Firefox enables network privacy feature for users in US

CNET: Firefox enables network privacy feature for users in US. “Mozilla has begun enabling a Firefox privacy feature for everyone in the US that should make it harder for ISPs or others to track you online. The technology, called DNS over HTTPS — DOH for short — protects a crucial internet addressing technology with encryption.” DOH? OMG.

Ars Technica: Signal is finally bringing its secure messaging to the masses

Ars Technica: Signal is finally bringing its secure messaging to the masses. “[Moxie] Marlinspike has always talked about making encrypted communications easy enough for anyone to use. The difference, today, is that Signal is finally reaching that mass audience it was always been intended for—not just the privacy diehards, activists, and cybersecurity nerds that formed its core user base for years—thanks in part to a concerted effort to make the app more accessible and appealing to the mainstream.”

Washington Post: ‘The intelligence coup of the century’

Washington Post: ‘The intelligence coup of the century’. “The company, Crypto AG, got its first break with a contract to build code-making machines for U.S. troops during World War II. Flush with cash, it became a dominant maker of encryption devices for decades, navigating waves of technology from mechanical gears to electronic circuits and, finally, silicon chips and software…. But what none of its customers ever knew was that Crypto AG was secretly owned by the CIA in a highly classified partnership with West German intelligence. These spy agencies rigged the company’s devices so they could easily break the codes that countries used to send encrypted messages.”

Exclusive: Apple dropped plan for encrypting backups after FBI complained – sources (Reuters)

Reuters: Exclusive: Apple dropped plan for encrypting backups after FBI complained – sources. “Apple Inc (AAPL.O) dropped plans to let iPhone users fully encrypt backups of their devices in the company’s iCloud service after the FBI complained that the move would harm investigations, six sources familiar with the matter told Reuters.”