InfoQ: Five Years of Lets Encrypt

InfoQ: Five Years of Lets Encrypt . “Five years ago, Let’s Encrypt broke out of its private beta and launched a public beta that allowed administrators to request a valid certificate that could be used for encryption with SSL (now TLS). After starting the private beta with 26,000 certificates issued, it has now grown to supporting over 230 million sites and has issued over a billion certificates.”

ZDNet: Older Android phones will start failing on some secure websites in 2021

ZDNet: Older Android phones will start failing on some secure websites in 2021. “They may not be cool, and they’re certainly not up to date, but there are millions of old Android smartphones out there running 2016’s Android 7.1 Nougat or earlier. On Sep. 1, 2021, however, those phones will start failing when they try to connect with websites secured by Let’s Encrypt Secure-Socket Layer (SSL)/Transport Layer Security (TLS) certificates.”

FTC: Settlement requires Zoom to better secure your personal information

FTC: Settlement requires Zoom to better secure your personal information. “When we rely on technology in these new ways, we share a lot of sensitive personal information. We may not think about it, but companies know they have an obligation to protect that information. The FTC just announced a case against videoconferencing service Zoom about the security of consumers’ information and videoconferences, also known as ‘Meetings.’”

New Yorker: Taking Back Our Privacy

New Yorker: Taking Back Our Privacy. “Since Signal was released, it has evolved from a niche tool, touted by the privacy-minded and the paranoid, into a mainstream product recommended by the Wall Street Journal. Activists use Signal to coördinate protests, lovers to conduct affairs, workers to unionize, finance professionals to exchange sensitive information, drug dealers to contact customers, journalists to communicate with sources.”

‘Classified knots’: Researchers create optical framed knots to encode information (Phys .org)

Phys .org: ‘Classified knots’: Researchers create optical framed knots to encode information. “In a world first, researchers from the University of Ottawa in collaboration with Israeli scientists have been able to create optical framed knots in the laboratory that could potentially be applied in modern technologies. Their work opens the door to new methods of distributing secret cryptographic keys—used to encrypt and decrypt data, ensure secure communication and protect private information.” I tried to look up framed knots but I was hit over the head with a mathematics cudgel. Wikipedia has an overview.

Radio New Zealand: New Zealand joins call for access to social media encrypted data

Radio New Zealand: New Zealand joins call for access to social media encrypted data. “Andrew Little, Justice Minister and minister responsible for this country’s intelligence agencies, issued the statement alongside Five Eyes partners Britain, the United States, Canada and Australia, as well as India and Japan. They say they support strong encryption that protects privacy, trade secrets and cyber security, but the technology also poses significant risks to public safety.”

Mashable: Why you should absolutely worry about the anti-privacy EARN IT Act

Mashable: Why you should absolutely worry about the anti-privacy EARN IT Act. “Because the internet is a strange and complicated place, the fate of your digital privacy is, at this very moment, intertwined with that of online message boards and comment sections. And things, we’re sorry to report, aren’t looking so hot. At issue is the seemingly unrelated EARN IT Act. Pushed by Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham and a host of bipartisan co-sponsors, and voted on by the Senate Judiciary Committee last Thursday, the measure ostensibly aims to combat online child sexual abuse material. However, according to privacy and security experts who spoke with Mashable, the bill both directly threatens end-to-end encryption and promises to spur new and sustained online censorship by weakening Section 230 — a provision of the Communication Decency Act of 1996 that protects internet providers from being held liable for their users’ actions.”

TechCrunch: Police roll up crime networks in Europe after infiltrating popular encrypted chat app

TechCrunch: Police roll up crime networks in Europe after infiltrating popular encrypted chat app. “Hundreds of alleged drug dealers and other criminals are in custody today after police in Europe infiltrated an encrypted chat system reportedly used by thousands to discuss illegal operations. The total failure of this ostensibly secure method of communication will likely have a chilling effect on the shadowy industry of crime-focused tech.”