CNET: Firefox enables network privacy feature for users in US

CNET: Firefox enables network privacy feature for users in US. “Mozilla has begun enabling a Firefox privacy feature for everyone in the US that should make it harder for ISPs or others to track you online. The technology, called DNS over HTTPS — DOH for short — protects a crucial internet addressing technology with encryption.” DOH? OMG.

Ars Technica: Signal is finally bringing its secure messaging to the masses

Ars Technica: Signal is finally bringing its secure messaging to the masses. “[Moxie] Marlinspike has always talked about making encrypted communications easy enough for anyone to use. The difference, today, is that Signal is finally reaching that mass audience it was always been intended for—not just the privacy diehards, activists, and cybersecurity nerds that formed its core user base for years—thanks in part to a concerted effort to make the app more accessible and appealing to the mainstream.”

Washington Post: ‘The intelligence coup of the century’

Washington Post: ‘The intelligence coup of the century’. “The company, Crypto AG, got its first break with a contract to build code-making machines for U.S. troops during World War II. Flush with cash, it became a dominant maker of encryption devices for decades, navigating waves of technology from mechanical gears to electronic circuits and, finally, silicon chips and software…. But what none of its customers ever knew was that Crypto AG was secretly owned by the CIA in a highly classified partnership with West German intelligence. These spy agencies rigged the company’s devices so they could easily break the codes that countries used to send encrypted messages.”

Exclusive: Apple dropped plan for encrypting backups after FBI complained – sources (Reuters)

Reuters: Exclusive: Apple dropped plan for encrypting backups after FBI complained – sources. “Apple Inc (AAPL.O) dropped plans to let iPhone users fully encrypt backups of their devices in the company’s iCloud service after the FBI complained that the move would harm investigations, six sources familiar with the matter told Reuters.”

Wired: An Open Source Effort to Encrypt the Internet of Things

Wired: An Open Source Effort to Encrypt the Internet of Things. “End-to-end encryption is a staple of secure messaging apps like WhatsApp and Signal. It ensures that no one—even the app developer—can access your data as it traverses the web. But what if you could bring some version of that protection to increasingly ubiquitous—and notoriously insecure—Internet of Things devices?”

TechCrunch: Over two dozen encryption experts call on India to rethink changes to its intermediary liability rules

TechCrunch: Over two dozen encryption experts call on India to rethink changes to its intermediary liability rules. “Security and encryption experts from around the world are joining a number of organizations to call on India to reconsider its proposed amendments to local intermediary liability rules. In an open letter to India’s IT Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad on Thursday, 27 security and cryptography experts warned the Indian government that if it goes ahead with its originally proposed changes to the law, it could weaken security and limit the use of strong encryption on the internet.”

Neowin: ProtonMail launches public beta of its fully encrypted calendar

Neowin: ProtonMail launches public beta of its fully encrypted calendar. “ProtonMail has announced that it has launched the public beta of ProtonCalendar, the firm’s fully encrypted calendar solution. Unlike alternative products, ProtonCalendar encrypts event titles, descriptions, locations, and participants; this makes it ‘impossible’ for others – including ProtonMail – to see your event details.”