The Conversation: Your internet data is rotting

The Conversation: Your internet data is rotting. “Acid-free paper can last 500 years; stone inscriptions even longer. But magnetic media like hard drives have a much shorter life, lasting only three to five years. They also need to be copied and verified on a very short life cycle to avoid data degradation at observed failure rates between 3% and 8% annually. Then there is also a problem of software preservation: How can people today or in the future interpret those WordPerfect or WordStar files from the 1980s, when the original software companies have stopped supporting them or gone out of business?”

The Guardian: UK risks losing classic rock archives, warns ex-Oasis photographer

The Guardian: UK risks losing classic rock archives, warns ex-Oasis photographer. “The UK could lose large swathes of classic British rock photography to private collectors unless it preserves them in a dedicated museum, according to one of the country’s most celebrated music photographers.”

Forbes: We Must Bring Libraries, Journalists And Technologists Together To Preserve Online News

Forbes: We Must Bring Libraries, Journalists And Technologists Together To Preserve Online News. “In recent years there has been a steadily growing, but long-overdue interest in preserving our collective societal memory recorded in the ephemeral and incredibly fragile world of online journalism. From traditional textual news articles to interactive features, photo galleries, video reporting and new technologies like VR features, digital journalism has become the dominate medium through which we understand the world around us. Unlike print journalism, which has long been archived by libraries akin to books, with paper stacked on shelves in a passive process, preserving online journalism requires actively seeking it out and complex preservation processes foreign to both the library and journalism worlds. How might technologists help the library and journalism worlds reimagine how they preserve online news?”

The Guardian: ‘Academic vandalism’ – unique archive of the Troubles under threat

The Guardian: ‘Academic vandalism’ – unique archive of the Troubles under threat. “The Conflict Archive on the Internet (Cain) website, based in Derry, has taken two decades to build up an unrivalled encyclopaedic digital record of the conflict. It includes oral histories, election results, political memorabilia, public records, bibliographies and the names and details of more than 3,600 Troubles-related killings in Northern Ireland, Ireland, the UK and continental Europe. The information is free to access and responsive to requests and queries ranging from school students, professors and former paramilitaries. But perhaps not for much longer. Ulster University, which hosts the archive’s three-strong team at its Magee campus, is threatening to pull the plug. The university says the cost, estimated at £170,000 a year, is unsustainable.”

South China Morning Post: Time to press ahead with archive law

South China Morning Post: Time to press ahead with archive law. “Just how tall is 4,488 metres? This is roughly half of Mount Everest in height or five of Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building. Intriguingly, it is also the height of the documents destroyed by the Hong Kong government last year. The volume was a three-year high, according to the city’s official records agency. The figure certainly does nothing for the government’s environmental protection credentials. But for a bureaucracy overseeing a sophisticated city of 7 million people, such a volume may well be the result of vigorous control and restraints. However, the lack of legal supervision and sanctions means the public is unable to tell whether this is the case.”

Mukurtu: an online dilly bag for keeping Indigenous digital archives safe (The Conversation)

The Conversation: Mukurtu: an online dilly bag for keeping Indigenous digital archives safe. “Mukurtu (pronounced MOOK-oo-too) is an online system that aims to help Indigenous communities conserve stories, videos, photographs, songs, word lists and other digital archives. Mukurtu is a Warumungu word meaning ‘dilly bag’ or a safe keeping place for sacred materials. It’s a free, mobile, and open source platform built with Indigenous communities in mind to manage and share digital cultural heritage.”

The Canberra Times: National Archives review begins as agency races to save ‘at risk’ records

The Canberra Times: National Archives review begins as agency races to save ‘at risk’ records. “Nearly 200,000 hours of recordings containing Australia’s memory are at risk under a looming six-year deadline to save the National Archives’ vulnerable files, its director-general says. David Fricker issued the warning about the nation’s ageing historical recordings after the federal government started an independent review of the agency’s needs.”