University of Stirling: Heritage experts to study responses to protecting Ukraine’s cultural heritage and monuments

University of Stirling: Heritage experts to study responses to protecting Ukraine’s cultural heritage and monuments. “The main goal of the project is to identify national and international responses that aim to safeguard heritage and heritage practitioners during the war, helping to create more effective and targeted support for the work of professionals and communities in the future. Researchers… will track support initiatives and networks of cooperation across Europe, investigate their impact, and identify the challenges of providing helpful aid and assistance in conflict and post-conflict environments.”

Government of Australia: National Cultural Policy launched

Government of Australia: National Cultural Policy launched. “The policy will stimulate new employment and training opportunities, ensure creative workers can access fair remuneration and safe work environments, and that intellectual property rights of our creators are protected. It also recognises the crucial place of First Nations stories and the importance of self-determination.”

Associated Press: Ukraine’s Odesa city put on UNESCO heritage in danger list

Associated Press: Ukraine’s Odesa city put on UNESCO heritage in danger list. “The United Nations’ cultural agency decided Wednesday to add the historic center of Ukraine’s Black Sea port city of Odesa to its list of endangered World Heritage sites, recognizing ‘the outstanding universal value of the site and the duty of all humanity to protect it.’ The decision was made at an extraordinary session of UNESCO’s World Heritage Committee in Paris.”

‘An ethical and moral imperative’: One woman’s quest to save Australia’s dying songs (Sydney Morning Herald)

Sydney Morning Herald: ‘An ethical and moral imperative’: One woman’s quest to save Australia’s dying songs. “Australia sits at the centre of an extraordinary web of linguistic and cultural diversity. More than 2000 of the world’s 6000 languages are spoken in Australia, the South Pacific and South-East Asia. Within the next 100 years, the number is predicted to dwindle to just a few hundred as communities age, traditions break down, and the climate crisis claims islands across the Pacific. The archive contains field recordings from the village of Tahal Nessa on Paama Island – a part of Vanuatu that is no longer inhabitable due to climate change.”

Trove in trouble: why does it cost money to keep the resource online? (Cosmos)

Cosmos: Trove in trouble: why does it cost money to keep the resource online?. “The online database Trove may go offline in the middle of the year without additional funding. Trove, which is owned and operated by the National Library of Australia (NLA), is a free resource which provides access to billions of digital documents, images, media and records of physical documents. It also contains millions of digitised Australian newspaper pages and issues.”

ABC News (Australia): National galleries and museums hopeful for May budget cash lifeline after Anthony Albanese labels them ‘starved of funds’

ABC News (Australia): National galleries and museums hopeful for May budget cash lifeline after Anthony Albanese labels them ‘starved of funds’. “The nation’s largest cultural institutions are hopeful the prime minister’s suggestion they have been ‘starved of funds’ in recent years will be followed with hefty cheques in the next federal budget, due in May.”

The Conversation: Trove’s funding runs out in July 2023 – and the National Library is threatening to pull the plug. It’s time for a radical overhaul

The Conversation: Trove’s funding runs out in July 2023 – and the National Library is threatening to pull the plug. It’s time for a radical overhaul. “The repeated threats to the public’s access to nationally significant collections are part of a broader malaise. Australia’s national collecting institutions have been hobbled by funding cuts and debilitating efficiency dividends for decades, with the some of the deepest cuts occurring in the years since Trove was launched. Reduced access to these publicly funded resources is more than an inconvenience: it is an attack on democratic accountability.”

AFP: Iraqi conservators strive to preserve ancient manuscripts

AFP: Iraqi conservators strive to preserve ancient manuscripts. “In a country that bears the scars of decades of conflict and has seen antiquities and cultural heritage regularly plundered, the House of Manuscripts’ collection has managed to survive. It was safely stashed away in the Baghdad suburbs, while the national museum was ransacked in the turmoil following the 2003 US-led invasion…. The collection, now ensconced in the national museum in the capital Baghdad, includes books, parchments and calligraphy boards, some of them damaged by humidity, pests and centuries of use.”

Yale News: Digitally rebuilding a lost city

Yale News: Digitally rebuilding a lost city. “The ancient city of Dura-Europos, on the bank of the Euphrates River in present-day Syria, has long fascinated archaeologists and historians for its cultural diversity — Jewish, Christian, Mithraic, and other religious groups lived and worshiped close to each other…. [Holly Rushmeier and Anne Chen] recently received a $350,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to develop a digital archive of materials related to the archaeological site of Dura-Europos.”

University of Melbourne: Virtual reading rooms make rare and special collections available to all

University of Melbourne: Virtual reading rooms make rare and special collections available to all. “Two of Australia’s largest rare and special collections libraries are now available for the community to view and research online, with digital access to collection items being provided in one-on-one, real time Virtual Reading Room appointments…. A Virtual Reading Room uses high-resolution cameras and video conferencing technology to bring collections directly from the reading rooms to your own room in a one-on-one online session.”

ABC News (Australia): National Gallery of Australia chair projects $265 million shortfall over 10 years, jobs could go

ABC News (Australia): National Gallery of Australia chair projects $265 million shortfall over 10 years, jobs could go. “The National Gallery of Australia (NGA) may have to cut up to half its staff if the national institution’s funding isn’t increased by June of next year, independent senator David Pocock says.”

Georgia Tech: New Computing Approach May Save At-Risk Carnival Costume Making Tradition

Georgia Tech: New Computing Approach May Save At-Risk Carnival Costume Making Tradition. “Wire-bending has been a traditional method of constructing costumes for the Trinidad and Tobago Carnival since the 1930s, but Vernelle A.A. Noel, a joint professor with the School of Interactive Computing in the College of Computing and School of Architecture in the College of Design, has been conducting research on this at-risk practice.”

The Scotsman: Val McDermid backs Save Our Stories appeal launched to secure future of ‘fragile and brittle’ newspaper treasure trove

The Scotsman: Val McDermid backs Save Our Stories appeal launched to secure future of ‘fragile and brittle’ newspaper treasure trove. “The guardians of Scotland’s biggest newspaper archive have launched an appeal to secure the future of ‘fragile and brittle’ collections said to be at risk of being lost forever due to their declining condition.”

International Council of Museums: ICOM launches the Emergency Red List of Cultural Objects at Risk – Ukraine

International Council of Museums: ICOM launches the Emergency Red List of Cultural Objects at Risk – Ukraine. “…experts from 11 museums across Ukraine have collaborated with ICOM’s Heritage Protection Department to research and prepare this comprehensive Emergency Red List, which is composed of 53 type of objects pertaining to 7 categories that span archaeology, books and manuscripts, numismatics, and folk, religious, applied and fine art.”

The National: How virtual reality is being used to recreate Iraq’s destroyed heritage

The National: How virtual reality is being used to recreate Iraq’s destroyed heritage. “The new Mosul Heritage Museum in Iraq is inviting people to experience its greatest historical sites — in virtual reality…. Through painstaking documentation, computer technology and virtual-reality artistry, Qaf Lab, an innovation hub in Mosul that supports Iraqi entrepreneurs, has reconstructed five heritage sites destroyed or damaged by ISIS during their three-year occupation of Mosul from 2014.”