CBC: Hear Indigenous language speakers from around the globe through Google Earth

CBC: Hear Indigenous language speakers from around the globe through Google Earth. “Users of Google Earth are now able to hear over 50 Indigenous language speakers from across the globe saying words and simple phrases and even singing traditional songs. The project, called Celebrating Indigenous Languages, is designed to honour the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages.”

ThePrint: Not just Modi’s museum for PMs, Indian MPs need archives and oral histories too

ThePrint: Not just Modi’s museum for PMs, Indian MPs need archives and oral histories too. “Nearly 500 Members of Parliament have passed away in the last fifteen years, 25 of them belonged to India’s first Lok Sabha. That is loss of history, not just human lives. An old African saying goes: When an old person dies, a whole library burns too. Members of Parliament negotiate, debate and decide on issues that shape our country and are an invaluable part of India’s legislative and deliberative history. With each death, Indians lose valuable institutional history of Parliament and personal memories of their leaders.”

Global Press Journal: How Sri Lankans Are Preserving History, One Manuscript At a Time

Global Press Journal: How Sri Lankans Are Preserving History, One Manuscript At a Time. “Thousands of one-of-a-kind manuscripts written on palmyrah leaves that were lost during Sri Lanka’s civil war, are being recovered. Now, local people are working to digitize them and preserve the history they contain.” This Web site was a bit of a slow load for me, but I found the article well worth it.

ABC News (Australia): Indigenous ranger’s quest to preserve Simpson Desert knowledge and 60,000-year-old history of his people

ABC News (Australia): Indigenous ranger’s quest to preserve Simpson Desert knowledge and 60,000-year-old history of his people. “An Aboriginal elder from south-west Queensland wants to preserve the 60,000-year-old culture and history of his people and the story of their life in the Simpson Desert before it is too late.”

The Conversation: From Shark Bay seagrass to Stone Age Scotland, we can now assess climate risks to World Heritage

The Conversation: From Shark Bay seagrass to Stone Age Scotland, we can now assess climate risks to World Heritage. “Climate change is the fastest-growing global threat to World Heritage. However, no systematic approach to assess the climate vulnerability of each particular property has existed – until now. Our newly developed tool, the Climate Vulnerability Index, was showcased this week at the UNESCO World Heritage Committee meeting in Baku, Azerbaijan. This CVI provides a systematic way to rapidly assess climate risks to all types of World Heritage properties – natural, cultural and mixed.”

Pacific Standard: A Generation of Hip-Hop Was Given Away for Free. Can It Be Archived?

Pacific Standard: A Generation of Hip-Hop Was Given Away for Free. Can It Be Archived? . “Throughout the history of hip-hop, some of the genre’s most vibrant, popular, and forward-thinking music was never for sale through traditional record company channels—and some of it was never really for sale at all: mixtapes.”