Google Blog: Preserving languages and the stories behind them

Google Blog: Preserving languages and the stories behind them. “Thanks to a collaboration with our global partners, ranging from language communities to national language institutes, you can now discover the languages of Maya, Tepehua, Sanskrit, Vurës, Kumeyaay/Diegueño, Potawatomi and Serravallese, spoken across Mexico, South Asia, the South Pacific, the United States and Italy.”

New York Times: Catalan Pop? Corsican Rock? It’s Europe’s Other Song Contest.

New York Times: Catalan Pop? Corsican Rock? It’s Europe’s Other Song Contest.. “Around 200 million people will tune into the Eurovision Song Contest on Saturday to hear music from around the continent. The 25 pop stars who will compete in the final include those performing in Italian, Spanish and Ukrainian. Yet the millions of people in Europe who speak one of its many regional and minority languages are unlikely to find themselves represented on the Eurovision stage, let alone in their country’s pop charts. Since 2002, Liet International has been offering a platform to musicians from these communities — though it is a world away from the showy spectacle of a Eurovision final.”

Radio Free Asia: China blocks use of Tibetan language on learning apps, streaming services

Radio Free Asia: China blocks use of Tibetan language on learning apps, streaming services. “Chinese government restrictions on use of the Tibetan language have now spread to video services and other online platforms, as Beijing continues to push the assimilation of China’s ethnic minorities into the dominant Han Chinese culture, according to Tibetan sources.”

The quest to save Oregon’s Kalapuya: ‘You lose a language, you lose a culture’ (The Oregonian)

The Oregonian: The quest to save Oregon’s Kalapuya: ‘You lose a language, you lose a culture’. “On a drizzly January morning, Esther Stutzman’s dining room table is covered with sticky notes, worksheets, notepads and several bulky Kalapuya dictionaries. Seated next to Stutzman are her two daughters and granddaughter, all Kalapuyan descendants and enrolled members of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians. Their jovial banter belies the gravity of their mission: to revive the lost language of their ancestors. The scattered documents form a paper trail to their heritage.”

Associated Press: Tech tool tribe uses to save language

Associated Press: Tech tool tribe uses to save language. “By itself, being able to read smartphone home screens in Cherokee won’t be enough to safeguard the indigenous language, endangered after a long history of erasure. But it might be a step toward immersing younger tribal citizens in the language spoken by a dwindling number of their elders. That’s the hope of Principal Chief Richard Sneed of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, who is counting on more inclusive consumer technology — and the involvement of a major tech company — to help out.”

World Economic Forum: 1,500 endangered languages could disappear by the end of the century

World Economic Forum: 1,500 endangered languages could disappear by the end of the century. “There are 7,000 documented languages currently spoken across the world, but half of them could be endangered, according to a new study. It is predicted that 1,500 known languages may no longer be spoken by the end of this century. Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) analyzed thousands of languages to identify factors that put endangered ones at risk. The findings highlight a link between higher levels of schooling and language loss, as regionally dominant languages taught in class often overshadow indigenous tongues.”

PR Newswire: Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Launch Digital Ute Language Dictionary (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Launch Digital Ute Language Dictionary (PRESS RELEASE). “The Ute Language digital dictionary is the latest resource for speakers and learners of the Ute Language. Time is critical for this Indigenous community as they fight to reinvigorate the next generation of learners. It is estimated that today there are a little over 110 fluent Ute Mountain Ute speakers. The Ute Mountain Ute digital dictionary will be free for learners to access on the web or to download the app on both iOS and Android devices.”

UNESCO: UNESCO launches the World Atlas of Languages to celebrate and protect linguistic diversity

UNESCO: UNESCO launches the World Atlas of Languages to celebrate and protect linguistic diversity. “The World Atlas of Languages presents basic data on the existing 8,324 languages spoken or signed in the world, in use and not in use, as well as more detailed data documenting how 1,863 languages are used in various domains at the national level, enabling the construction of linguistic country profiles for over 80 countries. The platform featuring this rich dataset will open to the general public in February 2022.”

Penn Today: A partnership to preserve Kashaya

Penn Today: A partnership to preserve Kashaya. “Since the 1980s, linguist Eugene Buckley has studied this Native American language, now spoken by just a dozen or so people. In collaboration with members and descendants of the Kashia Band of Pomo Indians, he’s built a database of Kashaya words, sounds, and stories.”

Borneo Post: Bengkel Borneo gathers creative talents to create ‘Soundbank’

Borneo Post: Bengkel Borneo gathers creative talents to create ‘Soundbank’. “The online interactive exhibition explores the theme ‘Divided by Lockdowns and Borders, Can We Still Connect Digitally Across Oceans Through Sound?’, and presents words, songs and photographs from Malaysian, Indonesian and British collaborators…. Launched today, Soundbank features recordings in over five indigenous languages, where several are highly-endangered; Kayan, Dusun and Gaelic, to name a few – demonstrating the diversity of the collaborators involved in this international project.”

New York Times: Marie Wilcox, Who Saved Her Native Language From Extinction, Dies at 87

New York Times: Marie Wilcox, Who Saved Her Native Language From Extinction, Dies at 87. “For many years, Marie Wilcox was the guardian of the Wukchumni language, one of several Indigenous languages that were once common in Central California but have either disappeared or nearly disappeared. She was the only person for a time who could speak it fluently. She started writing down words in Wukchumni as she remembered them in the late 1990s, scrawling on the backs of envelopes and slips of paper. Then she started typing them into an old boxy computer. Soon she was getting up early to devote her day to gathering words and working into the night.”

News@Northeastern: The Race To Save Indigenous Languages, Using Automatic Speech Recognition

News@Northeastern: The Race To Save Indigenous Languages, Using Automatic Speech Recognition. “Growing up in the windy plains near the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, [Michael] Running Wolf says that although his family—which is part Cheyenne, part Lakota—didn’t have daily access to running water or electricity, sometimes, when the winds died down, the power would flicker on, and he’d plug in his Atari console and play games with his sisters. These early experiences would spur forward a lifelong interest in computers, artificial intelligence, and software engineering that Running Wolf is now harnessing to help reawaken endangered indigenous languages in North and South America, some of which are so critically at risk of extinction that their tallies of living native speakers have dwindled into the single digits.”

Green Bay Press-Gazette: Ron Corn Jr. is one of fewer than 20 fluent speakers of the Menominee language. He’s working to change that.

Green Bay Press-Gazette: Ron Corn Jr. is one of fewer than 20 fluent speakers of the Menominee language. He’s working to change that.. “The Menominee Nation offers language instruction through its education system, including an immersion program in which small children are fully immersed in the language. But grassroots programs, such as Menomini yoU, allow for tribal citizens, or anyone else not attending Menominee schools, to learn from home any time.Their website… informs users that they can learn at their own pace, whether 10 minutes or four hours a day and whether it’s in the morning, afternoon or evening.”