Internet Archive: 71,716 video tapes in 12,094 days

Internet Archive: 71,716 video tapes in 12,094 days. “On November 4, 1979 Marion Stokes began systematically video taping television news and continued for more than 33 years, until the day she died. The Internet Archive is now home to the unique 71k+ video cassette collection and is endeavoring to help make sure it is digitized and made available online to everyone, forever, for free.”

Nunatsiaq News: Library and Archives Canada offers funds for Indigenous digitization projects

Nunatsiaq News: Library and Archives Canada offers funds for Indigenous digitization projects. “Library and Archives Canada wants to help Indigenous organizations preserve their past by transferring it into the future. Their new initiative—Listen, Hear Our Voices—is calling for applications to fund the digitization of culture and language recordings from cassette and VHS tapes.”

The Flying Nun Project: Tally Ho! (National Library of New Zealand)

National Library of New Zealand: The Flying Nun Project: Tally Ho!. “Back in July 2018, we announced that the tape archive of renowned music label Flying Nun Records had been donated to the Alexander Turnbull Library. This news received media coverage from TVNZ, Radio NZ, Stuff, NZ Herald, The Spinoff and other outlets, as well as inspiring discussion on blogs and social media. Much interest stemmed from the plan to digitise the archive over three years – an urgent task given the global challenge of preserving magnetic tape AV media. Ten months on, the time is ripe for an update about how the Flying Nun Project is getting on, together with some exciting (new) news – and an unreleased recording to whet your appetite!”

The Canberra Times: National Archives review begins as agency races to save ‘at risk’ records

The Canberra Times: National Archives review begins as agency races to save ‘at risk’ records. “Nearly 200,000 hours of recordings containing Australia’s memory are at risk under a looming six-year deadline to save the National Archives’ vulnerable files, its director-general says. David Fricker issued the warning about the nation’s ageing historical recordings after the federal government started an independent review of the agency’s needs.”

Jackson Free Press: MSU Digitizes Endangered Citizens Council Radio Tapes

Jackson Free Press: MSU Digitizes Endangered Citizens Council Radio Tapes. “On those tapes, the state’s old leaders often revel in their opposition to civil rights and support for segregation, revealing much about Mississippi’s political culture in the tumultuous years of the 1950s and 1960s. In one recording, [John Bell] Williams, who was then a Democratic congressman, calls the Civil Rights Act ‘the most monstrous piece of tyrannical legislation ever considered by Congress.’ In another, [Ross] Barnett, who was no longer governor at the time, claims communists are behind the civil rights movement. Digital recordings of those tapes, MSU libraries announced Thursday, are now available online.”

DJ Kippax: How to bulk rip lots of vinyl (and not go crazy)

DJ Kippax: How to bulk rip lots of vinyl (and not go crazy). “This record ripping guide is useful even if you’re not a DJ. The methods I outline will work for anyone who has the problem of digitising a large collection of filthy vinyls whilst trying maintain good sound quality.” A super deep dive from Mr. Kippax.

Boston Public Library’s 78rpm Records Come to the Internet: Reformatting the Boston Public Library Sound Archives (Internet Archive)

Internet Archive: Boston Public Library’s 78rpm Records Come to the Internet: Reformatting the Boston Public Library Sound Archives. “Following eighteen months of work, more than 50,000 78rpm record ‘sides’ from the Boston Public Library’s sound archives have now been digitized and made freely available online by the Internet Archive.” I listened to a Cab Calloway song from 1946 (“Hey Now, Hey Now” if you care) and while it did have pops and crackles I was surprised at how good the sound quality was.