Down to Earth: Citizen science helping to prepare biggest-ever database on Indian wild canids

Down to Earth: Citizen science helping to prepare biggest-ever database on Indian wild canids. “The largest-ever database on wild canids or members of the dog family that are native to India is being formed, with ‘citizen science’ playing a major role in the process. The Wild Canids–India Project has multiple components, each of which is designed to get a comprehensive understanding of the ecological and conservation requirements of wild canids and hyenas in India.”

Cision: Government of Canada Makes it Easier for Canadians to Learn about Aquatic Species at Risk (PRESS RELEASE)

Cision: Government of Canada Makes it Easier for Canadians to Learn about Aquatic Species at Risk (PRESS RELEASE). “Fisheries and Oceans Canada has updated and improved its online aquatic species at risk mapping tool. The improved interactive mapping tool allows Canadians to find out where aquatic species at risk and their critical habitat are located across Canada. The tool is now interactive, user-friendly and intuitive. Users can zoom in and out on the data and save their results.”

National Geographic Australia: How Artificial Intelligence Is Changing Wildlife Research

National Geographic Australia: How Artificial Intelligence Is Changing Wildlife Research. “With the help of Wildbook and the nonprofit Giraffe Conservation Foundation, Stacy-Dawes, a research coordinator at the zoo’s Institute for Conservation Research, and her colleagues are able to blitz a giraffe population with photos over two days, upload the images and location data to their GiraffeSpotter database, and presto: a robust population assessment emerges. So far they’ve used Wildbook to assess giraffe numbers across three wildlife conservancies in northern Kenya…. By year’s end GiraffeSpotter will be publicly accessible so that everybody from park rangers to tourists on safari can upload their giraffe photos and location information to the online database.”

The Conversation: How we arrived at a $1 billion annual price tag to save Africa’s lions

The Conversation: How we arrived at a $1 billion annual price tag to save Africa’s lions. “A billion dollars. That’s approximately what it would cost, to save the African lion. That’s a billion dollars each year, every year into the foreseeable future. The startling price tag comes from a calculation we did, starting with a new database we compiled of available funding in protected areas with lions. To our knowledge it’s the most comprehensive and up-to-date database of its kind.”

Gazette & Herald: People urged to ‘log their hogs’ for project

Gazette & Herald: People urged to ‘log their hogs’ for project. “TWO conservation charities are urging people in rural area to take part in their project aimed at logging sightings of an increasingly rare mammal. The People’s Trust for Endangered Species (PTES) and the British Hedgehog Preservation Society are running the Hedgehog Street project, which asks people to ‘log their hogs’, either dead or alive, in an online database.”

Design Week: Redesigning the biggest list of endangered species in the world

Design Week: Redesigning the biggest list of endangered species in the world. “The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, an exhaustive online database of animals, plants and fungi that are at risk of extinction, has been given a new website in a bid to engage more people in conservation and make finding crucial information easier.”

The Conversation: How forensic science has helped rediscover forgotten apples

The Conversation: How forensic science has helped rediscover forgotten apples. “It’s been a good year for apples. Across Europe the apple harvest is the biggest it has been for a decade. But the handful of apple types you see on supermarket shelves only tells part of the story. There are actually 7,500 varieties of eating apple grown all over the world, and growers and scientists are making efforts to conserve and extend this.”