Associated Press: Body parts from threatened wildlife widely sold on Facebook

Associated Press: Body parts from threatened wildlife widely sold on Facebook. “Facebook is displaying advertisements for well-known American corporations on group pages operated by overseas wildlife traffickers illegally selling the body parts of threatened animals, including elephant ivory, rhino horn and tiger teeth. In a secret complaint filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, wildlife preservation advocates allege that Facebook’s failure to stop illicit traders using its service for illegal activity violates the social network’s responsibilities as a publicly traded company.”

Bernama: Waze to alert drivers of wild animals?

Bernama: Waze to alert drivers of wild animals?. “The Department of Wildlife and National Parks Peninsular Malaysia (Perhilitan) is in discussion with community based traffic and navigation app, Waze to include roadkill hot spots affecting wild animals, especially endangered species. Biodiversity Conservation Division assistant director Gilmore G. Bolongon said the effort is one of the department’s long term strategies to protect wildlife.”

Phys .org: Using artificial intelligence to investigate illegal wildlife trade on social media

Phys. org: Using artificial intelligence to investigate illegal wildlife trade on social media. “Illegal wildlife trade is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity conservation and is currently expanding to social media. This is a worrisome trend, given the ease of access and popularity of social media. Efficient monitoring of illegal wildlife trade on social media is therefore crucial for conserving biodiversity. In a new article published in the journal Conservation Biology, scientists from the University of Helsinki, Digital Geography Lab, argue that methods from artificial intelligence can be used to help monitor the illegal wildlife trade on social media.”

NPR: 21 Tech Companies Band Together Against Wildlife Trafficking

NPR: 21 Tech Companies Band Together Against Wildlife Trafficking. “The Global Coalition to End Wildlife Trafficking Online, organized by Google and the World Wildlife Fund, was announced Wednesday morning. It includes companies such as Alibaba, Baidu, eBay, Facebook, Instagram and Microsoft, and they’re pledging to ‘work together to collectively reduce wildlife trafficking across platforms by 80% by 2020.'”

Business Insider: There’s now a giant database for rare zoo animals to find a mate that works just like a dating app

Business Insider: There’s now a giant database for rare zoo animals to find a mate that works just like a dating app. “Rare animals can now have profiles uploaded to a global database called the Zoological Information Management System. According to The Times newspaper, more than a thousand paper ‘studbook’ animal records are in the process of being added to the database, which covers 22,000 species. The data transfer is due to take around two years.”

Phys .org: AI computer vision breakthrough IDs poachers in less than half a second

Phys .org: AI computer vision breakthrough IDs poachers in less than half a second. “Thousands of animals including elephants, tigers, rhinos, and gorillas are poached each year. Researchers at the USC Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society have long been applying AI to protect wildlife. Initially, computer scientists were using AI and game theory to anticipate the poachers’ haunts, and now they have applied artificial intelligence and deep learning to spot poachers in near real-time.”

Indonesia traffickers sold crocs, pythons on social media: police (Phys .org)

Phys.org: Indonesia traffickers sold crocs, pythons on social media: police. “A group of suspected animal traffickers have been arrested in Indonesia for selling crocodiles, pythons and other protected species through Facebook and the messaging service WhatsApp, police said Wednesday. The case is the latest example of how social media has become a key online market place for animal traffickers as conservationists warn that tech giants have not done enough to halt the trade on their platforms.”