Stoke-on-Trent Live: Treasure trove of North Staffordshire’s mining heritage to be put online

Stoke-on-Trent Live: Treasure trove of North Staffordshire’s mining heritage to be put online. “Volunteers have won a 10,000 grant to bring North Staffordshire’s mining heritage back to life for the digital generation. They have rescued thousands of photos, maps, artefacts and other documents that were left abandoned following the collapse of Chatterley Whitfield Mining Museum. Now these items are being turned into an online archive that people can dip into for enjoyment or to help with school projects and family research.”

Bottle kilns to bomb sites: The archive where the nation’s architecture is frozen in time (i News)

i News: Bottle kilns to bomb sites: The archive where the nation’s architecture is frozen in time. “For much of her career Dusty Deste made her living by taking pictures of luxury goods, including a stint as Cartier’s in-house photographer. But when she was not immortalising high-end jewellery and taking portraits, the bank manager’s daughter was able to indulge her greater passion – capturing on film life in Britain’s disappearing industrial heartlands. From the 1950s until her retirement in the early 1980s, Ms Deste would drive her trusty Land Rover, which doubled as a mobile dark room, to chronicle vanishing cornerstones of working life such as the coal-fired bottle kilns of the Potteries and textile mills of Northern England.”

BuryTimes: We Were There Too project to immortalise contribution of region’s Jewish community to WWI

BuryTimes: We Were There Too project to immortalise contribution of region’s Jewish community to WWI. “The We Were There Too project represents a permanent record of the lives of Jewish men, women and families between 1914 and 1918, and details their military service and efforts on the home front. First introduced in London in 2016, the project has now been extended to the North West thanks to a Heritage Lottery Fund Grant.”

Daily Echo: Dorset County Asylum project gets grant

Daily Echo: Dorset County Asylum project gets grant. “The asylum, which was originally founded in 1832, was based at Forston House in Charminster, near Dorchester. By the 1860s, this facility was too small and the new asylum at the Herrison site was opened in 1863. Herrison House itself (pictured) was opened in 1904, and in 1940 the institution became known as Herrison Hospital. The archive, which dates back to 1832, consists of 300 boxes of material, including thousands of poignant individual patient records, as well as a wide range of other material – from building plans to the hospital’s farm, and even social activities such as the rounders society.” The institution closed in 1992.

University of Birmingham: University of Birmingham Research sheds light on Early Stuart England pamphleteering

University of Birmingham: University of Birmingham Research sheds light on Early Stuart England pamphleteering. “Hundreds of handwritten pamphlets detailing the news, politics, intrigue and scandals of pre-Civil War Britain are now at academics, history buffs, teachers and students’ fingertips thanks to a project led by University of Birmingham historian Dr Noah Millstone.”

Nottinghamshire Live: See these lovely old photos of Nottingham which feature on city library’s new website

Nottinghamshire Live: See these lovely old photos of Nottingham which feature on city library’s new website. “Photographs of old Nottingham never fail to fascinate. They reveal the way some things have changed … and some have stayed the same. They show a time when people had less, but always looked happy to pose for the camera. They record the steps of progress in fashion, housing, transport, education and occupation. Now, a new website hosting thousands of old Nottingham photographs has opened online, a century after the city’s photographic collection was established, giving people instant access to all manner of historic images capturing our rich social heritage.” Even if you don’t want to go to the photo collection, read the article. Whoever chose the photos to include with it did a great job. I did mention this collection at the beginning of November, but I’m mentioning it again because it’s completely launched and the photos are that good.

West Bridgford Wire: New website of Nottingham photos goes live 100 years after collection was launched

West Bridgford Wire: New website of Nottingham photos goes live 100 years after collection was launched. “A new website hosting thousands of Nottingham photographs will be launched from 1 November 2018, one hundred years after the city’s photographic collection was established…. Images include some of the oldest Nottingham photographs from the 1850s, taken by Samuel Bourne, as well as many local pictures, engravings and sketches dating from the 1700s onwards.”