About Manchester: New website launched to explore Peterloo

About Manchester: New website launched to explore Peterloo. “A new website… has been launched that will interactively explore the events and legacy of thePeterloo Massacre 200 years after this watershed moment in Britain’s democracy. Using detailed 3D imagery the user is placed in St Peter’s Field so that they can see how events unfolded when 60,000 people gathered in Manchester on 16 August 1819 seeking rights and representation.”

The Journal: Shepherd, Loyola Chicago awarded grant to create historical database

The Journal: Shepherd, Loyola Chicago awarded grant to create historical database. “The Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture at the College of William & Mary has awarded Benjamin Bankhurst, assistant professor of history at Shepherd University, and Kyle Roberts, associate professor of public history and new media and director of the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities at Loyola University Chicago, with a $5,000 Lapidus Digital Collections Fellowship for ‘The Maryland Loyalist Project.’ The project is a collaboration between Bankhurst and Roberts, aiming to make the letters and petitions of British loyalists who fled the American Revolution housed in the British National Archives available in a digital archive.”

Shropshire Star: Shropshire photos preserved through Express & Star archive project go live on new website

Shropshire Star: Shropshire photos preserved through Express & Star archive project go live on new website. “About 3,000 images of the history of the industrial past of the Black Country and its surrounding areas have been preserved for future generations… The Express & Star Photographic Collection partnership received a grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund to produce a website and digitise photographs dating back over the past century.” My knowledge of England’s geography is woeful but the BBC gave me an overview of some opinions on what makes the “Black Country” of England. (like many geographical areas, there are disagreements.)

Northumberland Gazette: New websites and a TV channel for museum

Northumberland Gazette: New websites and a TV channel for museum. “After months of painstaking hardwork, Bailiffgate Museum volunteers have launched two new websites and the Bailiffgate TV YouTube channel. Residents will see familiar faces and uncover new stories about their community, and researchers from across the world will have access to the new, searchable, digital archives.”

Stoke-on-Trent Live: Treasure trove of North Staffordshire’s mining heritage to be put online

Stoke-on-Trent Live: Treasure trove of North Staffordshire’s mining heritage to be put online. “Volunteers have won a 10,000 grant to bring North Staffordshire’s mining heritage back to life for the digital generation. They have rescued thousands of photos, maps, artefacts and other documents that were left abandoned following the collapse of Chatterley Whitfield Mining Museum. Now these items are being turned into an online archive that people can dip into for enjoyment or to help with school projects and family research.”

Bottle kilns to bomb sites: The archive where the nation’s architecture is frozen in time (i News)

i News: Bottle kilns to bomb sites: The archive where the nation’s architecture is frozen in time. “For much of her career Dusty Deste made her living by taking pictures of luxury goods, including a stint as Cartier’s in-house photographer. But when she was not immortalising high-end jewellery and taking portraits, the bank manager’s daughter was able to indulge her greater passion – capturing on film life in Britain’s disappearing industrial heartlands. From the 1950s until her retirement in the early 1980s, Ms Deste would drive her trusty Land Rover, which doubled as a mobile dark room, to chronicle vanishing cornerstones of working life such as the coal-fired bottle kilns of the Potteries and textile mills of Northern England.”

BuryTimes: We Were There Too project to immortalise contribution of region’s Jewish community to WWI

BuryTimes: We Were There Too project to immortalise contribution of region’s Jewish community to WWI. “The We Were There Too project represents a permanent record of the lives of Jewish men, women and families between 1914 and 1918, and details their military service and efforts on the home front. First introduced in London in 2016, the project has now been extended to the North West thanks to a Heritage Lottery Fund Grant.”