Hull Live: Families share memories of airship disaster to mark 100th anniversary

Hull Live: Families share memories of airship disaster to mark 100th anniversary. “An appeal for information ahead of the 100th anniversary of an airship disaster that claimed dozens of lives has unearthed a range of ‘touching’ stories and artefacts from the families of casualties, survivors and witnesses. The R.38/ZR-2 exploded mid-flight and crashed into the Humber in front of thousands of onlookers in Hull on August 24 1921, leaving 44 of the aircraft’s 49-strong British and American crew dead.”

Century-old sunshine: Photos of an Edwardian family enjoying summer holidays are saved from the refuse tip (The Independent)

The Independent: Century-old sunshine: Photos of an Edwardian family enjoying summer holidays are saved from the refuse tip. “John Thomson, 43, discovered 400 photos on glass plate negatives and rolls of film when he was working in a secondhand book shop 12 years ago…. John, from Bath, Somerset, started processing the pictures using his smartphone and online software and shared them on Twitter.”

Saffron Walden Reporter: Essex village celebrates 1,000 years of memories with new archive

Saffron Walden Reporter: Essex village celebrates 1,000 years of memories with new archive. “St Botolph’s Church in Hadstock was consecrated 1,001 years ago, with celebrations marking the milestone throughout 2020 and 2021. Hadstock’s online archive has been launched at the end of the celebrations as a record of 1,000 years in the life of an Essex village.” Read the article and see all everything they did for the archive.

The Star: Sheffield’s amazing cutlery history celebrated at online project launch

The Star: Sheffield’s amazing cutlery history celebrated at online project launch. “The Name on a Knife Blade project, which actually began last year, is the brainchild of the city’s unique and internationally-renowned Hawley Collection, which is housed at the museum. The Ken Hawley Collection Trust looks after Ken’s lifetime’s work to preserve the history of Sheffield’s edge tools and cutlery manufacture and silversmithing, which amounts to more than 100,000 items of all sorts.”

The Reporter: Glass giant celebrates St Helens history with online heritage hub

The Reporter: Glass giant celebrates St Helens history with online heritage hub. “Historic images chart Pilkington UK’s almost 200-year history at the forefront of glass making and the lives of those who worked there, from the three wealthy founding families, to the apprentices and production line workers. The hub recognises the seminal contributions of Sir Alistair Pilkington, with his industry-shaping invention of the Float Glass process in 1958; now the world standard for high-quality flat glass manufacture.”

University of Exeter: Oldest book of English literature in the world available to browse online for the first time

University of Exeter: Oldest book of English literature in the world available to browse online for the first time. “One of the oldest books of English literature in the world – created more than 1,000 years ago – is now available for anyone to browse online for the first time. The Exeter Book is one of the four most significant verse manuscripts to survive from the Anglo-Saxon period and contains the vast majority of all surviving Old English poetry. Its origins are a mystery.”

Daily Mail: Conservators find QUILL inside Queen Elizabeth I-era document

Daily Mail is not one of my usual sources, but I’ll make an exception. Daily Mail: Conservators find QUILL inside Queen Elizabeth I-era document. “A quill with ink still its nib has been found in between the pages of an official document dating from the rule of Queen Elizabeth I. The writing implement was discovered by conservators when they were carrying out repair work on the manuscript, a draft land lease agreement, at the National Archives’ headquarters in Kew, West London, yesterday.”

King’s College London: Five Objects connecting Shakespeare and the Royal Family

King’s College London: Five Objects connecting Shakespeare and the Royal Family. “Shakespeare in the Royal Collection is a three-year AHRC-funded research project exploring the relationship between Shakespeare and the royal family in the centuries since Shakespeare’s death. A team of researchers have created an online database containing all the Shakespeare-related items in the Royal Collection (including paintings, books, drawings, prints, letters, essays, decorative objects, furniture and photographs), which anyone can explore.”

Medievalists: Medieval database revived – examines writings from early medieval England

Thanks to Diane R. We toss resources back and forth to each other via email and she sent me a gem yesterday from Medievalists: Medieval database revived – examines writings from early medieval England. “Created in the 1990s, the loss of the ground-breaking Fontes Anglo-Saxonici database in 2018 made it virtually impossible once again to trace the precise borrowings within the early medieval literary heritage of the British Isles. However, in a multi-disciplinary project involving medieval scholars and computer scientists, researchers and enthusiasts of the period can once again cross-reference medieval authors with their global counterparts from whom they often ‘borrowed’ long passages in pre-plagiarism times.”

BBC: Appeal for tales of Hull airship crash which killed 44

BBC: Appeal for tales of Hull airship crash which killed 44. “An appeal has been launched for stories and memorabilia ahead of the 100th anniversary of an airship disaster which killed 44 people. The R.38/ZR-2 exploded mid-flight in front of onlookers in Hull on 24 August 1921, before crashing into the River Humber, killing most of the crew. The airship, called the ‘Titanic of the skies’, was on a test flight before being handed over to the US Navy.”

The Guardian: Oh what a lovely archive: British Library gets Joan Littlewood treasure trove

The Guardian: Oh what a lovely archive: British Library gets Joan Littlewood treasure trove. “It is cheering to learn that the Murray Melvin Archive, documenting the story of the Theatre Royal Stratford East from 1884 to 2017, has been donated to the British Library. Students and theatre buffs will soon have access to a treasure trove that provides a portrait not just of a building but also of the work of one of the great, unsung pioneers of postwar theatre, Joan Littlewood.”

BBC: Swansea unveils digital Blitz archive for anniversary

BBC: Swansea unveils digital Blitz archive for anniversary. “Digital archive footage will be seen for the first time in commemoration of 80 years since the Blitz. The three-night raid on Swansea in 1941 killed 230 people, injured almost 400 and left the city centre in ruins. Among the commemorations, an index of Swansea civilians who died in World War Two, called Civilian War Dead, will be digitised for the first time.”

The Northern Echo: Finding love beneath the waterworks tree

The Northern Echo: Finding love beneath the waterworks tree. “Whereas Vincent lived in the west end of town, and his father, William, became the town’s mayor in 1931, Alice lived in a terrace on Corporation Road and worked in an insurance office. These very different ends of town were united by the Greenbank Methodist Church, where both their families worshipped and where their eyes first met. The website also features Alice’s diary, so we can see the relationship developing from both sides.”

New York Times: Lockdown Gardening in Britain Leads to Archaeological Discoveries

New York Times: Lockdown Gardening in Britain Leads to Archaeological Discoveries. ” Gardeners in Hampshire, a county in southeast England, were weeding their yard in April when they found 63 gold coins and one silver coin from King Henry VIII’s reign in the 16th century, with four of the coins inscribed with the initials of the king’s wives Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn and Jane Seymour. The archaeological find was one of more than 47,000 in England and Wales that were reported this year, amid an increase in backyard gardening during coronavirus lockdowns, the British Museum said on Wednesday.”