Pitchfork: Beatles’ Iconic Abbey Road Crosswalk Gets Repainted Because Nobody Is Outside

Pitchfork: Beatles’ Iconic Abbey Road Crosswalk Gets Repainted Because Nobody Is Outside. “A London municipal crew was able to repaint the crosswalk in front of Abbey Road Studios, where the Beatles shot the cover to their 1969 album. The area’s usual heavy foot traffic—which you can watch live on a webcam—has been drastically reduced by the city’s social-distancing measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19, which made the update possible according to NBC News.”

Hampshire Chronicle: Nine decades of Winchester Cathedral Record goes online

Hampshire Chronicle: Nine decades of Winchester Cathedral Record goes online. “The Friends of Winchester Cathedral have published The Winchester Cathedral Record annually since 1931. Every edition has now been scanned and placed online in a new open access as part of the Friends’ 90th anniversary celebration next year.”

Adam Matthew: Adam Matthew Digital announces publication of ‘Poverty, Philanthropy and Social Conditions in Victorian Britain’

Adam Matthew: Adam Matthew Digital announces publication of ‘Poverty, Philanthropy and Social Conditions in Victorian Britain’. “Adam Matthew Digital has today announced the publication of ‘Poverty, Philanthropy and Social Conditions in Victorian Britain ’, a vital resource for the study and teaching of life in Victorian Britain. With material drawn from the British Library, the National Archives, UK and the Family Welfare Association Library housed at Senate House Library, UK, this unique collection offers insight and perspective on welfare reform and the social tensions surrounding poverty at the time.”

Daily Mail: Church of England to launch a ‘Google Maps for graves’ within five years enabling family historians to search for burial records and locations in an online database

Daily Mail is not a resource I link to often, but in this case…. Daily Mail: Church of England to launch a ‘Google Maps for graves’ within five years enabling family historians to search for burial records and locations in an online database. “Thousands of cemeteries across the UK will be imaged and mapped over the next five years to create a comprehensive database of British burial sites. The Church of England project hopes to immortalise the tombs of millions of people buried in Anglican graveyards as well as those interred on unconsecrated land.”

Find. Map. Save: join the search to save thousands of miles of lost historic paths (Ramblers)

Ramblers: Find. Map. Save: join the search to save thousands of miles of lost historic paths. “An estimated 10,000 miles of historic paths – the equivalent of the distance from London to Sydney – are thought to be missing from the map in England and Wales. These historic paths are a vital part of our heritage, describing how people have travelled over the centuries, yet if they are not claimed by 2026, we risk losing them forever. We want to build a movement of ‘citizen geographers’ to help find all these missing rights of way before it’s too late.”

Layers of London: the latest (British Library)

British Library: Layers of London: the latest. “Layers of London, a website home to more than 200 georeferenced maps of London and 1000s of crowdsourced histories, have now launched the latest pillar of their mission, the Layermaker, where anyone can log in to try their hand at georeferencing one (or one thousand) of these aerial images of London. Using the same platform as the British Library’s georeferencer, the user friendly tool makes it simple for anyone to contribute to this project.”

Air & Space Magazine: These Amateur Archaeologists Dig Up the Buzz Bombs That Fell on England in WW2

Air & Space Magazine: These Amateur Archaeologists Dig Up the Buzz Bombs That Fell on England in WW2. “The brothers locate the crashed V-weapons by examining county and national records, including the official ‘bomb census’—an attempt by the wartime authorities to record the damage caused by falling bombs. Because those records are incomplete, they also check combat reports from fighter pilots on V-1 patrols. The brothers work closely with historical officers for the county of Kent and send a copy of the final report from each dig to Britain’s Ministry of Defence. They make a detailed risk assessment at each site before a dig begins.”