Manchester Evening News: The grisly history of Britain’s biggest and worst World War Two internment camp

Manchester Evening News: The grisly history of Britain’s biggest and worst World War Two internment camp. “An old cotton mill hides a shameful, little-known secret. Now part of an industrial estate, the brick buildings have changed little over the years. A passer-by might never know the suffering endured there After the outbreak of the Second World War, the mill became a grim, spartan internment camp for thousands of innocent Italian, Austrians and German Jews who had fled the fear of Nazi death camps for new lives in Britain. All men – they were wrongly branded ‘enemy aliens’ as wartime national security was blurred with paranoia and suspicion.”

BBC Genome Blog: Pages from history – Radio Times in the 1930s

BBC Genome Blog: Pages from history – Radio Times in the 1930s. “The BBC Genome Project is releasing the next batch of pages from Radio Times, this time covering the 1930s. Genome users will now be able to access the articles, editorial material, letters pages, illustrations and photographs from the 1930s. We hope this will help users correct some of the errors in the Genome data – as well as gain insights into broadcasting during this fascinating period.”

OpenLearn: How did Facebook likes help Labour at the ballot box?

OpenLearn: How did Facebook likes help Labour at the ballot box?. “The 2017 election saw a stronger than foreseen performance by the Labour Party. Matt Walsh explains how Labour’s Facebook success played out, heralding the party’s overall campaign performance. GE2017 was a numbers game: by achieving very high levels of organic reach, Labour managed to target undecided voters in marginal constituencies, energise voters who had drifted away from the party, and mobilise the young.”

Engadget: Russian Twitter accounts tried to influence the UK’s EU departure

Engadget: Russian Twitter accounts tried to influence the UK’s EU departure. “Russia’s attempt to influence Western politics through Twitter certainly wasn’t limited to the 2016 American elections. Wired and New Knowledge have combed through the Russia-linked accounts provided to US politicians, and it identified at least 29 bogus users that backed the UK’s European Union exit (aka Brexit). The accounts used Brexit-related hashtags, stirred Islamophobic sentiment and used racist anti-refugee language. These accounts weren’t ignored, either. Combined, they had 268,643 followers and got some posts shared hundreds of times.”

Remembrance Day: On Armistice Day 2017 search for those in your family or street who died in The Great War (Somerset Live)

Somerset Live: Remembrance Day: On Armistice Day 2017 search for those in your family or street who died in The Great War. “If you have ever wondered whether any members of your family or if people who used to live on your street, were among the fallen during the 1914-1918 war, then this database allows you to search for them easily.. You can search by any combination of first name (or initial), surname, street or town/city. You don’t have to fill in all the boxes – you can fill as many or as few as you like.” Pretty sure this is UK-only. The search interface is at the bottom of the article. Update: After I posted this to my personal Facebook and tagged a couple of genealogists, genealogist Amy Johnson Crow responded: “Thanks for sharing that, Tara. You’re right — it’s a UK/Canada/Australia/New Zealand database; it’s from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. It looks like it includes only those who are buried in military cemeteries or who have their names included on a memorial.” I am including the comment here with her permission. Thanks Amy!

The Guardian: English Heritage joins the digital age with new Google partnership

The Guardian: English Heritage joins the digital age with new Google partnership. “Viewers will be able to peer into English Heritage palaces, explore castle ruins and admire historic ceilings in detail without leaving the comfort of their own homes through a new partnership between the charity and Google Arts and Culture. The website will open up 29 English Heritage properties – the first time that Google has worked with an arts institution across so many sites – including stately homes, castles, prehistoric sites and 19th-century industrial buildings.”

The Guardian: MPs demand Twitter act over Russian interference in UK politics

The Guardian: MPs demand Twitter act over Russian interference in UK politics. “A parliamentary committee is demanding Twitter hands over lists of Russian-related accounts that may have attempted to interfere in the UK’s democratic process. The call from MPs on the digital, culture, media and sport committee came after Twitter told a US Congress inquiry it had detected thousands of Russian troll accounts posting material linked to American politics.”