Kent County Council: KCC’s collection of Parish Registers goes online for the first time

Kent County Council: KCC’s collection of Parish Registers goes online for the first time. “Leading family history website, Findmypast, has today announced the online publication of thousands of original parish registers in partnership with Kent County Council. The new records have been created from more than 3,000 handwritten registers currently held at the Kent History and Library Centre in Maidstone….More than 2.6 million fully-indexed baptism, wedding banns, marriage and burial records spanning more than 400 years of Kent history are now available to search online exclusively.”

Shropshire Star: Shropshire photos preserved through Express & Star archive project go live on new website

Shropshire Star: Shropshire photos preserved through Express & Star archive project go live on new website. “About 3,000 images of the history of the industrial past of the Black Country and its surrounding areas have been preserved for future generations… The Express & Star Photographic Collection partnership received a grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund to produce a website and digitise photographs dating back over the past century.” My knowledge of England’s geography is woeful but the BBC gave me an overview of some opinions on what makes the “Black Country” of England. (like many geographical areas, there are disagreements.)

Lancashire Post (England): Here’s how comments on social media comments can hinder court cases

Lancashire Post (England): Here’s how comments on social media comments can hinder court cases. “The rise of social media has presented a new problem for the legal system and one it is still grappling with. That’s why in 2013, the then attorney general Dominic Grieve, announced plans to discourage social media users on Facebook and Twitter from jeopardising court cases by publishing potentially prejudicial comments.”

The Week: Social media firms face ban over suicide images

The Week: Social media firms face ban over suicide images. “Matt Hancock has written to social media bosses at Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, Pinterest, Google and Apple warning them to ‘purge’ material promoting self-harm and suicide to ensure they do not breach the policies of internet providers.”

Stoke-on-Trent Live: Treasure trove of North Staffordshire’s mining heritage to be put online

Stoke-on-Trent Live: Treasure trove of North Staffordshire’s mining heritage to be put online. “Volunteers have won a 10,000 grant to bring North Staffordshire’s mining heritage back to life for the digital generation. They have rescued thousands of photos, maps, artefacts and other documents that were left abandoned following the collapse of Chatterley Whitfield Mining Museum. Now these items are being turned into an online archive that people can dip into for enjoyment or to help with school projects and family research.”

Bottle kilns to bomb sites: The archive where the nation’s architecture is frozen in time (i News)

i News: Bottle kilns to bomb sites: The archive where the nation’s architecture is frozen in time. “For much of her career Dusty Deste made her living by taking pictures of luxury goods, including a stint as Cartier’s in-house photographer. But when she was not immortalising high-end jewellery and taking portraits, the bank manager’s daughter was able to indulge her greater passion – capturing on film life in Britain’s disappearing industrial heartlands. From the 1950s until her retirement in the early 1980s, Ms Deste would drive her trusty Land Rover, which doubled as a mobile dark room, to chronicle vanishing cornerstones of working life such as the coal-fired bottle kilns of the Potteries and textile mills of Northern England.”

Clinton Envy, Mandela and a Horse: Glimpses From the U.K. Archives (New York Times)

New York Times: Clinton Envy, Mandela and a Horse: Glimpses From the U.K. Archives. “Every year, the British public gains access to declassified cables and sensitive memos from the top tiers of the government: glimpses of diplomatic outposts around the world, ministers’ thoughts scribbled in margins, and disputes between famous leaders, released by the country’s National Archives. And sometimes, the public gets to see notes about a horse.”