The Star: Sheffield’s amazing cutlery history celebrated at online project launch

The Star: Sheffield’s amazing cutlery history celebrated at online project launch. “The Name on a Knife Blade project, which actually began last year, is the brainchild of the city’s unique and internationally-renowned Hawley Collection, which is housed at the museum. The Ken Hawley Collection Trust looks after Ken’s lifetime’s work to preserve the history of Sheffield’s edge tools and cutlery manufacture and silversmithing, which amounts to more than 100,000 items of all sorts.”

University of Exeter: Oldest book of English literature in the world available to browse online for the first time

University of Exeter: Oldest book of English literature in the world available to browse online for the first time. “One of the oldest books of English literature in the world – created more than 1,000 years ago – is now available for anyone to browse online for the first time. The Exeter Book is one of the four most significant verse manuscripts to survive from the Anglo-Saxon period and contains the vast majority of all surviving Old English poetry. Its origins are a mystery.”

Liverpool Echo: Birkenhead’s little known links to the father of science fiction

Liverpool Echo: Birkenhead’s little known links to the father of science fiction. “John [Lamb] has used his research to create a new website, ‘Jules Verne and the Heroes of Birkenhead’ after finding no real reference of the author’s links to Merseyside online. His articles exploring the ties between his books and the area are being serialised and he said more will be revealed in the coming weeks.” Limited at the moment but more to come. The Web design is charmingly 1998. It even has a visitor counter.

Wired: Citizen Scientists Digitized Centuries of Handwritten Rain Data

Wired: Citizen Scientists Digitized Centuries of Handwritten Rain Data. “IN MARCH 2020, as the United Kingdom went into pandemic lockdown, climate scientist Ed Hawkins put out a call to people with time on their hands: He needed help turning nearly 350 years’ worth of archival rainfall reports into digital documents that modern researchers could easily use. To his surprise, 16,000 people volunteered…. Now, just over a year later, his group has released their work, a massive data set of upwards of 5 million observations extracted from the UK Meteorological Office’s paper records—the oldest dating to 1677.”

Daily Mail: Conservators find QUILL inside Queen Elizabeth I-era document

Daily Mail is not one of my usual sources, but I’ll make an exception. Daily Mail: Conservators find QUILL inside Queen Elizabeth I-era document. “A quill with ink still its nib has been found in between the pages of an official document dating from the rule of Queen Elizabeth I. The writing implement was discovered by conservators when they were carrying out repair work on the manuscript, a draft land lease agreement, at the National Archives’ headquarters in Kew, West London, yesterday.”

King’s College London: Five Objects connecting Shakespeare and the Royal Family

King’s College London: Five Objects connecting Shakespeare and the Royal Family. “Shakespeare in the Royal Collection is a three-year AHRC-funded research project exploring the relationship between Shakespeare and the royal family in the centuries since Shakespeare’s death. A team of researchers have created an online database containing all the Shakespeare-related items in the Royal Collection (including paintings, books, drawings, prints, letters, essays, decorative objects, furniture and photographs), which anyone can explore.”

The Guardian: If the British understood taxes better, perhaps we would vote for them to be fairer

The Guardian: If the British understood taxes better, perhaps we would vote for them to be fairer. “TaxLab, an information service unveiled by the Institute for Fiscal Studies, is a wonder of elegant clarity, its impartial explainers revealing what everyone should know: and it’s guaranteed to surprise most people. Two years in construction, the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Friends Provident Foundation funded it to create a better-informed electorate. A mouse-click shows that people in Britain pay less tax (in 2019 figures), at 33% of GDP, than the EU average of 39%, while in Denmark it’s 46%. Put in your pay and TaxLab shows exactly where you stand in the income pecking order: people wildly miscalculate, both rich and poor, placing themselves too near the middle. Young people are generous to older people, but if they understood the tax biases benefiting retired people they might be more […]

uDiscoverMusic: Tears For Fears, Portishead Celebrated In New Project Abou`t Bath And Bristol Music Scene

uDiscoverMusic: Tears For Fears, Portishead Celebrated In New Project About Bath And Bristol Music Scene. “The new website features historical information on over 250 venues in the regions, alongside interviews with artists and producers. Users will also be able to access the information from a phone app in what developers are deeming ‘a location-based digital museum project taking you on a musical journey through Bristol and Bath.’”

Medievalists: Medieval database revived – examines writings from early medieval England

Thanks to Diane R. We toss resources back and forth to each other via email and she sent me a gem yesterday from Medievalists: Medieval database revived – examines writings from early medieval England. “Created in the 1990s, the loss of the ground-breaking Fontes Anglo-Saxonici database in 2018 made it virtually impossible once again to trace the precise borrowings within the early medieval literary heritage of the British Isles. However, in a multi-disciplinary project involving medieval scholars and computer scientists, researchers and enthusiasts of the period can once again cross-reference medieval authors with their global counterparts from whom they often ‘borrowed’ long passages in pre-plagiarism times.”

BBC: Appeal for tales of Hull airship crash which killed 44

BBC: Appeal for tales of Hull airship crash which killed 44. “An appeal has been launched for stories and memorabilia ahead of the 100th anniversary of an airship disaster which killed 44 people. The R.38/ZR-2 exploded mid-flight in front of onlookers in Hull on 24 August 1921, before crashing into the River Humber, killing most of the crew. The airship, called the ‘Titanic of the skies’, was on a test flight before being handed over to the US Navy.”

Beyond the Pandemic: London’s financial hub seeks a rebirth (ABC News)

ABC News: Beyond the Pandemic: London’s financial hub seeks a rebirth. “Plagues, fires, war — London has survived them all. But it has never had a year like this. The coronavirus has killed more than 15,000 Londoners and shaken the foundations of one of the world’s great cities. As a fast-moving mass vaccination campaign holds the promise of reopening, The Associated Press looks at the pandemic’s impact on London’s people and institutions and asks what the future might hold.”

Cycling News: Bikmo launches bike theft tracking tool as 74,000 bikes reported stolen in 2020

Cycling News: Bikmo launches bike theft tracking tool as 74,000 bikes reported stolen in 2020. “Bikmo has today launched an interactive bike theft tracking heatmap, combining police data and population data to find the best and worst areas for bike theft in England and Wales in 2020. The aggregated data confirms that 74,573 bikes were reported stolen across the two countries, down from 83,536 in 2019.”

Covid: Outdoor meetings and sport to resume in England (BBC)

BBC: Covid: Outdoor meetings and sport to resume in England. “Two households or groups of up to six people are now able to meet outside in England again as the stay-at-home Covid restrictions order comes to an end. Outdoor sport facilities including tennis courts and golf courses are also reopening, and organised outdoor sports can resume in the latest easing. And weddings will also be on again, attended by up to six people.”