Bustle: How To Use Neopronouns, According To An Expert & People Who Use Them

Bustle: How To Use Neopronouns, According To An Expert & People Who Use Them. “Neopronouns express a similar idea as they/them, but neopronouns are intentionally created to make pronouns that feel like home. Neopronouns like xe/xem/xeir and ze/zir/zirs also allow people to refer to folks in the third person without placing them in a gender binary — Xe is such an incredible writer, you think while reading an awesome book by a nonbinary human. Many more neopronouns exist than binary pronouns, and you can check out a list of neopronouns here.”

CNET: Baby Yoda makes it onto Dictionary. com’s list of new slang

CNET: Baby Yoda makes it onto Dictionary.com’s list of new slang. “If you’ve been living under a rock for the last few months and want to find out who Baby Yoda is, you can now look him up in the dictionary. Dictionary.com on Wednesday unveiled a list of new slang additions, which include OK boomer, VSCO girl and cancel culture.”

Genealogy 101: Using the Dictionary of American Regional English for Genealogy (GenealogyBank)

GenealogyBank: Genealogy 101: Using the Dictionary of American Regional English for Genealogy. “In this article – part of an ongoing ‘Introduction to Genealogy’ series – Gena Philibert-Ortega describes a helpful resource for genealogists, the ‘Dictionary of American Regional English,’ and how it can help with your family history research. Gena is a genealogist and author of the book ‘From the Family Kitchen.'”

Wired: ‘Boomerspeak’ Is Now Available for Your Parodying Pleasure

Wired: ‘Boomerspeak’ Is Now Available for Your Parodying Pleasure . “In 2019, young people learned how to talk like boomers. It showed up in tweets (‘why do boomers all have such a strange relationship with capitalization and punctuation’), on Reddit (‘On my first ever Facebook post to a friend’s wall, I signed my name like some kind of boomer’), and people who type ‘ok boomer’ as “O.K., Boomer.” There’s a Facebook group where people pretend to be boomers, which consists of typing things like ‘say hi to Joe and the kids for me,,, love! You.’ “

EurekAlert: AI achieved a score of 185 on the English written exam of the National Center Test For University Admissions in 2019

EurekAlert: AI achieved a score of 185 on the English written exam of the National Center Test For University Admissions in 2019. “The Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT, CEO: Jun Sawada) took the English written exam of the 2019 National Center Test for University Admissions and achieved high marks of 185 points (64.1 T-score).”

University of Toronto: Global Database of Atrocities on Cameroon Crisis

University of Toronto: Global Database of Atrocities on Cameroon Crisis. “The database will aggregate, verify, secure, and publish information about atrocities or crimes against humanity committed by Cameroonian military and non-state armed groups. It is non-partisan and apolitical. All documentation will be securely stored and published online with four main objectives in mind: international justice processes; a possible national truth, justice, and reconciliation commission; advocacy, journalism, academic research; and deterrence from further violence and gross impunity.”

Larry Ferlazzo: “Freckle” Provides Hundreds Of Articles In “5 Or More Different Reading Levels”

Larry Ferlazzo: “Freckle” Provides Hundreds Of Articles In “5 Or More Different Reading Levels”. “It’s an ‘adaptive’ platform where teachers can set up free virtual classrooms (it looks like it’s free to individual teachers, but schools and districts can pay for more features) and is supposed to differentiate in English, Math and Social Studies content. It was particularly struck by it having “hundreds” of the same articles written at different lexile levels.”

Phys .org: Bellevue startup uses artificial intelligence to help English learners’ pronunciation

Phys .org: Bellevue startup uses artificial intelligence to help English learners’ pronunciation. “Bellvue-based Blue Canoe’s mobile app directs its users to repeat sentence prompts and record them. Speech-recognition technology then analyzes the recordings and uses machine-learning models to point out the differences. When users spend 10 minutes per day on the app, personalized feedback from an artificially intelligent (AI) teacher informs students precisely how they mispronounced words.”

Straits Times: National AI database gains 1,000 hours of local English voice samples

Straits Times: National AI database gains 1,000 hours of local English voice samples. “Speech apps and tools such as voice transcription apps could soon be able to pick up Singapore English more accurately, as their developers can now access better data from an expanded corpus of local speech. Some 1,000 hours of natural conversations on topics such as favourite foods and holidays have been added to the National Speech Corpus (NSC), an artificial intelligence (AI) database of locally accented speech maintained by the Infocomm Media Development Authority (IMDA).”

New York Daily News: CUNY researchers seek to create first database of New York City English

New York Daily News: CUNY researchers seek to create first database of New York City English. “Five linguists are nearing the end of a three-year project to create the first ever ‘Corpus of New York City English’ – an online database composed of hundreds of audio interviews documenting the city accent in all its variations.”

BBC: Nature’s language is being hijacked by technology

BBC: Nature’s language is being hijacked by technology. “‘Apple’, ‘tweet’, ‘cloud’, ‘stream’ – words that once conjured vivid visions of the countryside are now synonymous with our technological world. And, a National Trust study suggests, just 1% of uses of the word ‘tweet’ in conversation now refer to birdsong. Similarly, while in the 1990s 100% of mentions of ‘stream’ meant ‘a little river’, that has now fallen to 36%.”

CTV News: Is the English language better because of the Internet? This linguist thinks so

CTV News: Is the English language better because of the Internet? This linguist thinks so. “A Canadian Internet linguist has written a new book arguing that the web has changed the English language for the better. Montreal-based Gretchen McCulloch’s new book ‘Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language’ aims to distill volumes of academic writing on Internet linguists and make it accessible to a popular audience.”

University of Wisconsin-Madison: New online tools to instruct and assess English learners with significant cognitive disabilities

University of Wisconsin-Madison: New online tools to instruct and assess English learners with significant cognitive disabilities. “Now, due to work by a team of education professionals and researchers — and a grant from the U.S. Department of Education — groundbreaking instructional materials and guides are available to help educators understand alternate English language development and assessment for students who have diverse needs related to language and disability. The comprehensive series of nearly 30 reports, briefs, tools, presentations and other resources is available online and by mail at no charge.”

TechCrunch: Microsoft’s new language learning app uses your phone’s camera and computer vision to teach vocabulary

TechCrunch: Microsoft’s new language learning app uses your phone’s camera and computer vision to teach vocabulary. “Eight Microsoft interns have developed a new language learning tool that uses the smartphone camera to help adults improve their English literacy by learning the words for the things around them. The app, Read My World, lets you take a picture with your phone to learn from a library of more than 1,500 words. The photo can be of a real-world object or text found in a document, Microsoft says.”

Merriam-Webster: We Added New Words to the Dictionary in April 2019

Merriam-Webster: We Added New Words to the Dictionary in April 2019. “The English language never sleeps, and neither does the dictionary. The work of revising a dictionary is constant, and it mirrors the culture’s need to make sense of the world with words. There are always new things to be named and new uses for existing words to be explained. A release of new words is also a map of the workings of a dictionary—you get to see what we’ve been up to—and of how words from different contexts come to reside in the same place.”