News Nine: Bhasha Centre’s new digital library aims to engage with theatre community, further collaborations between playwrights

News Nine: Bhasha Centre’s new digital library aims to engage with theatre community, further collaborations between playwrights. “The Drama Library is a free-for-all, open-access digital library of ‘unpublished’ Indian plays from English to Hindi, Kannada, Marathi, Bengali, Urdu, Gujarati, Tamil, Arabic, Sindhi and Dakhni Arabic.”

Babbel: Babbel Launches Free Language Courses For Ukrainians On Its Platform

Babbel: Babbel Launches Free Language Courses For Ukrainians On Its Platform. “Created with Babbel’s high quality standards, the courses offer native Ukrainian speakers the opportunity to learn German, Polish or English for free with Babbel’s award-winning app. The content is suitable for all learners, from beginner to intermediate, and available free of charge, making the community’s transition to Germany, Poland and other host countries easier.”

University of Leeds: Historic dialect recordings archive digitised for the public

University of Leeds: Historic dialect recordings archive digitised for the public. “During the 1950s and 60s, fieldworkers from the University travelled across the country to record the language and lifestyles of speakers across England, known as the Survey of English Dialects…. Now, the recordings can be heard by the public with the launch of the University’s Dialect and Heritage ‘In Your Words’ Project, led by the School of English and supported by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.”

The Justice: English professor develops virtual Open Corpus Project

The Justice: English professor develops virtual Open Corpus Project. “Prof. Dorothy Kim (ENG) is currently working to develop a virtual corpus, or collection of written texts, of Early Middle English language. This would give researchers the opportunity to search across multiple archives and databases of manuscripts. The current status of the Open Corpus Project, as the site is titled, was unveiled at a Faculty Lunch Symposium on Thursday, March 17.”

The Conversation: Five ways the internet era has changed British English – new research

The Conversation: Five ways the internet era has changed British English – new research. “Our new study based on the British National Corpus 2014 (BNC2014) – a 100 million-word sample of current language – shows us just how language has changed in the internet era. This data was contrasted with the original British National Corpus 1994 (BNC1994) – a comparable data set which samples British English from the early 1990s.”

The Hindu: Digital archive of school books launched

The Hindu: Digital archive of school books launched. “Azim Premji University on Monday launched an open access digital archive of over 5,600 school books and related material from India and other countries in South Asia. The Schoolbooks Archive, as the platform is called, has material in multiple languages including Kannada, Malayalam, Bengali, Arabic, and other languages apart from English that span a period of more than 200 years.” Fourteen languages are represented here, but English has the most materials.

Cornell Chronicle: Words used in text-mining research carry bias, study finds

Cornell Chronicle: Words used in text-mining research carry bias, study finds. “The word lists packaged and shared amongst researchers to measure for bias in online texts often carry words, or ‘seeds,’ with baked-in biases and stereotypes, which could skew their findings, new Cornell research finds. For instance, the presence of the seed term ‘mom’ in a text analysis exploring gender in domestic work would skew results female.”

Lab Manager: Google Scholar Shows Bias Against Non-English Papers

Lab Manager: Google Scholar Shows Bias Against Non-English Papers. “If you’ve written a scientific article or conference paper in a language other than English, it may as well not exist on Google Scholar, according to recent research published in Future Internet. Knowing that academic search engines such as Google Scholar have been optimized to ensure that research papers get optimal ranking in search results, researchers from Universitat Pompeu Fabra’s (UPF’s) Department of Communication (Barcelona, Spain) wanted to explore if the language documents were published in affected their ranking by search algorithms.”

NiemanLab: ProPublica experiments with ultra-accessible plain language in stories about people with disabilities

NiemanLab: ProPublica experiments with ultra-accessible plain language in stories about people with disabilities. “For an investigation into denied disability benefits in Arizona and an accompanying editor’s note, ProPublica is experimenting with plain language — a type of text that uses common words, short sentences, and clear structure to make information more accessible to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Bustle: How To Use Neopronouns, According To An Expert & People Who Use Them

Bustle: How To Use Neopronouns, According To An Expert & People Who Use Them. “Neopronouns express a similar idea as they/them, but neopronouns are intentionally created to make pronouns that feel like home. Neopronouns like xe/xem/xeir and ze/zir/zirs also allow people to refer to folks in the third person without placing them in a gender binary — Xe is such an incredible writer, you think while reading an awesome book by a nonbinary human. Many more neopronouns exist than binary pronouns, and you can check out a list of neopronouns here.”

Genealogy 101: Using the Dictionary of American Regional English for Genealogy (GenealogyBank)

GenealogyBank: Genealogy 101: Using the Dictionary of American Regional English for Genealogy. “In this article – part of an ongoing ‘Introduction to Genealogy’ series – Gena Philibert-Ortega describes a helpful resource for genealogists, the ‘Dictionary of American Regional English,’ and how it can help with your family history research. Gena is a genealogist and author of the book ‘From the Family Kitchen.’”