NOLA: Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, historian renowned for research into Louisiana slavery, dies at 93

NOLA: Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, historian renowned for research into Louisiana slavery, dies at 93. “Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, a New Orleans-born historian who revolutionized teaching about slavery in Louisiana by applying computer technology to information she unearthed in musty archives and courthouse records throughout the state, died Monday at her home in Guanajuato, Mexico. She was 93.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Family Papers Documenting The Lives Of Enslaved People In Liberty County, Georgia, Dating Back To The 1700s, Are Now Available Online.

Digital Library of Georgia: Family Papers Documenting The Lives Of Enslaved People In Liberty County, Georgia, Dating Back To The 1700s, Are Now Available Online.. “In partnership with the Midway Museum, the Digital Library of Georgia has just made the Julia R. King Collection available online…. The collection includes essential documents related to slavery, including estate appraisals and inventories that include the first names of enslaved African Americans. It will be of particular interest to those doing family research on people enslaved in Liberty County, Georgia.”

New-to-me: Northeast Slavery Records Index

New-to-me: the Northeast Slavery Records Index. From the front page: “The Northeast Slavery Records Index (NESRI) is an online searchable compilation of records that identify individual enslaved persons and enslavers in the states of New York, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut and New Jersey. NESRI indexes census records, slave trade transactions, cemetery records, birth certifications, manumissions, ship inventories, newspaper accounts, private narratives, legal documents and many other sources.”

CNN: Descendant of enslaved people can sue Harvard University over photos of half-naked ancestors, state supreme court rules

CNN: Descendant of enslaved people can sue Harvard University over photos of half-naked ancestors, state supreme court rules. “Massachusetts’ highest court has ruled that a woman claiming to be the descendant of enslaved people can proceed with some of the claims in her lawsuit against Harvard University. The June 23 ruling from the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court allows Tamara Lanier to seek damages from Harvard for mistreating her when using photographs of her ancestors — images known as daguerreotypes.”

CNET: A Virtual Tour Uncovers the Hidden History of Black Disenfranchisement

CNET: A Virtual Tour Uncovers the Hidden History of Black Disenfranchisement. “[Old Lick Cemetery]’s disturbing story would likely remain a footnote in the city’s history were it not for a project called Hidden in Plain Site, the brainchild of creative agency BrownBaylor. It’s designed to resurface the lost narrative of marginalized Black people across the US with experiences you can view through a browser or virtual reality headset.”

NBC News: How one young history buff is preserving the Gullah Geechee community on TikTok

NBC News: How one young history buff is preserving the Gullah Geechee community on TikTok . “The Gullah Geechee people make up one of the oldest and most extraordinary communities in the United States. But if you’ve never heard of them, it might be because their history is often sifted out of textbooks, and the longevity of their culture is now in danger. This distinctly African American community began on the eastern coastal islands — spanning from Florida all the way up to North Carolina in the 1600s. Slaves, mostly from West Africa, lived in complete isolation from the continental United States, separated by rivers, swamps and waterways that weren’t easy to cross.”

‘I wish to be made free and to remain in this country’: Testimony of liberated enslaved women, girls and boys (British Library)

British Library: ‘I wish to be made free and to remain in this country’: Testimony of liberated enslaved women, girls and boys. “On 19 November 1847, Gregor Grant, Senior Magistrate of Police at Bombay (Mumbai), sent depositions of forty-seven women and girls and twelve boys to the Government of Bombay. These individuals had been on board five baghlahs (sailing vessels) captured in the Persian Gulf in September 1847 by the East India Company’s Indian Navy and brought into Bombay Harbour…. The correspondence concerning the five baghlahs and the people on board can be found in the India Office Records file IOR/L/PS/5/452, which has been digitised and can be accessed through the Qatar Digital Library.”

The Harvard Crimson: Harvard Holds Human Remains of 19 Likely Enslaved Individuals, Thousands of Native Americans, Draft Report Says

The Harvard Crimson: Harvard Holds Human Remains of 19 Likely Enslaved Individuals, Thousands of Native Americans, Draft Report Says. “Harvard University holds the human remains of at least 19 individuals who were likely enslaved and almost 7,000 Native Americans — collections that represent ‘the University’s engagement and complicity’ with slavery and colonialism, according to a draft University report obtained by The Crimson.”

Brown University: Grant to support Brown-led global oral history project on slavery’s legacy

Brown University: Grant to support Brown-led global oral history project on slavery’s legacy . “With support from the grant, researchers at Brown’s Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice will collaborate with an international network of scholars in Senegal, South Africa, the United Kingdom, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Belgium, Brazil and beyond to host public conversations, capture video narratives and record oral histories that seek to answer two important questions: How did slavery and colonialism shape these places, and how did they shape the world as a whole?”

Alabama shipwreck holds key to the past for descendants of enslaved Africans: “Be sure that that legacy lives on” (CBS News)

CBS News: Alabama shipwreck holds key to the past for descendants of enslaved Africans: “Be sure that that legacy lives on”. “Work performed this month will help answer a question residents of the area called Africatown USA are anxious to resolve: Can remnants of the slave ship Clotilda be retrieved from the water to both fill out details about their heritage and to serve as an attraction that might revitalize the place their ancestors built after emancipation?”

University of Colorado Boulder: Interactive map gets closer to pinpointing African origins erased during slave trade

University of Colorado Boulder: Interactive map gets closer to pinpointing African origins erased during slave trade. “Conflicts among African nations during the collapse of the kingdom of Oyo in the early 19th century resulted in the enslavement of hundreds of thousands of people. Soldiers and traders removed men, women and children from their homes, transported them to coastal ports and loaded them onto slave ships—their names, birth places and family ties erased. Historians have a pretty good record of where these individuals departed Africa, but due to a lack of primary sources, little is known about where they originated before boarding slave ships. CU Boulder researchers are hoping to change that with a first-of-its-kind mathematical model estimating conditional probabilities of African origins during the transatlantic slave trade.” I have this under “Research” instead of “New Resources” because the map is more an expression of the model and not a polished […]

Enslaved people’s records show a grim, but needed, look at what made Nashville | Opinion (Tennessean)

Tennessean: Enslaved people’s records show a grim, but needed, look at what made Nashville | Opinion. “The spreadsheet, more than 14,000 rows deep with data, might bore you – until the names stop you cold: Eliza, age 3; Peter, 11; Martha Foster, 1. After each, it reads ‘child of Albert and Betsy.’ On Nov. 1, 1852, it says, John Nichol sold Albert and Betsy, along with Eliza, Peter, Martha Foster and their other five children to Bradford Franklin. Davidson County legally recorded this enslaved family as property, bought and sold. Metro Archivist Ken Fieth has spent some 25 years compiling a searchable spreadsheet, available here. Transaction by transaction, it lists buyer, seller, enslaved person’s name, gender, age and relatives (if known).”