Daily Advertiser: National Park Service project documents existing sharecropper, slave dwellings in the South

Daily Advertiser: National Park Service project documents existing sharecropper, slave dwellings in the South. “There is a growing movement led by historical preservationists to preserve sharecropper and slave cabins in order to present a fuller narrative of the families who lived in those dwellings and to discuss the enduring legacy of slavery and the Jim Crow-era in modern-day America.”

The Advocate: Southern University’s library tells more stories of former slaves as it expands online archives

The Advocate: Southern University’s library tells more stories of former slaves as it expands online archives. “The John B. Cade Library at Southern University recently expanded its online archive of slave stories, accounts told by former slaves who were interviewed in the late 1930s and early 1940s. The stories further a collection that had been compiled by the library’s namesake, who began collecting them even before serving as a dean at Southern from 1939-61.”

University of North Carolina at Greensboro: UNCG Receives Grant To Expand Digital Library On American Slavery

University of North Carolina at Greensboro: UNCG Receives Grant To Expand Digital Library On American Slavery. “UNC Greensboro University Libraries, along with faculty partners across the state, has received an $150,000 digital extension grant from The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) to expand its Digital Library on American Slavery (DLAS) to three more campuses in North Carolina: North Carolina Central University, UNC Pembroke, and East Carolina University.”

KBS World: Digital Archive on Japan’s Wartime Sexual Slavery to be Set up in UCLA

KBS World: Digital Archive on Japan’s Wartime Sexual Slavery to be Set up in UCLA. “A digital archive with translated primary sources and documentary evidence on Japan’s wartime sexual slavery is set to be established at the University of California, Los Angeles(UCLA). Comfort Women Action for Redress and Education(CARE), an advocacy group for the victims of Japan’s wartime sexual slavery, said Tuesday that the online archive will be set up at UCLA’s Center for Korean Studies as early as July. ”

New York Times: What Should Museums Do With the Bones of the Enslaved?

New York Times: What Should Museums Do With the Bones of the Enslaved?. “The announcement was the latest development in a highly charged conversation about African-American remains in museum collections, especially those of the enslaved. In January, the president of Harvard University issued a letter to alumni and affiliates acknowledging that the 22,000 human remains in its collections included 15 from people of African descent who may have been enslaved in the United States, and pledging to review its policies of ‘ethical stewardship.’ And now, that conversation may be set to explode.”

NL Times: Massive archive of Dutch slavery past published in digital archive

NL Times: Massive archive of Dutch slavery past published in digital archive. “The national archive of the Netherlands launched a virtual archive containing around 1.9 million documents about the Dutch history of slavery. The archives consist of restored material from the West India Company, the commercial slave trader Middelburgse Commercie Compagnie, the Suriname Society and documents about the Dutch occupation of the coast of Guinea. Caretaker education minister Ingrid van Engelshoven launched the archive on Friday. It is mainly comprise slave purchase records, ship logs, plantation lists, cargo overviews and invoices. Personal letters are also included, though they have not been fully investigated.”

EurekAlert: $1.4 million Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant expands Enslaved.org research

EurekAlert: $1.4 million Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant expands Enslaved.org research. “The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded $1.4 million to Michigan State University for Enslaved: Peoples of the Historical Slave Trade, or Enslaved.org, a first-of-its-kind database containing millions of records cataloging the lives of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Enslaved.org, developed and maintained by MSU researchers, links data collections from multiple universities, archives, museums and family history centers.”

Emory News Center: New consortium will ensure future of SlaveVoyages database

Emory News Center: New consortium will ensure future of SlaveVoyages database. “The new consortium, organized by Emory, will function as a cooperative academic collaboration through a contractual agreement among six institutions: Emory, the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture at William & Mary, Rice University, and three campuses at the University of California that will assume a joint membership: UC Santa Cruz, UC Irvine and UC Berkeley. Membership is for a three-year term and is renewable.”

Cavalier Daily: Law School launches new website exploring its connections to slavery

Cavalier Daily: Law School launches new website exploring its connections to slavery. “The University’s Law school launched Slavery and the U.Va. School of Law — a new website and digital archive that explores the law school’s historical connections to slavery — on Feb 1. At the core of this project are digitized versions of law students’ notebooks from the antebellum time period, when slavery was taught as a social good.”

Tennessean: Ancestor Project honors lives of enslaved people at Evergreen Plantation in Louisiana

New-to-me: Tennessean: Ancestor Project honors lives of enslaved people at Evergreen Plantation in Louisiana. “Frederick Baconnais was born during the peak of the sugar cane harvest season at the Evergreen Plantation in Edgard, Louisiana. At 5 a.m. on Dec. 12, 1852, he drew his first breath, according to historic records. His mother, Victorine, a house slave at Evergreen, was 18 years old. He was only two when she died. But Baconnais would name one of his daughters Victoria in remembrance of his mother. Their stories are among several recounted through photos and narratives in Evergreen’s Ancestor Project.”

CNN: Every investor in Britain’s slave trade set to be detailed in new ‘dictionary’ after funding from UK government

CNN: Every investor in Britain’s slave trade set to be detailed in new ‘dictionary’ after funding from UK government. “The first ever index of investors in Britain’s extensive slave trade is being compiled by academics, after the project received £1 million ($1.4 million) in funding from the UK government. The Dictionary of British Slave Traders will detail the 6,500 members of society who took part in the trade throughout a period stretching more then two centuries.”

Washington Post: A massive new effort to name millions sold into bondage during the transatlantic slave trade

Washington Post: A massive new effort to name millions sold into bondage during the transatlantic slave trade. “Enslaved: Peoples of the Historic Slave Trade, a free, public clearinghouse that launched Tuesday with seven smaller, searchable databases, will for the first time allow anyone from academic historians to amateur family genealogists to search for individual enslaved people around the globe in one central online location.”

Rhino Times: UNCG, A&T And Deeds Office Shed Light On Slave Trade History

Rhino Times: UNCG, A&T And Deeds Office Shed Light On Slave Trade History. “A few years ago, the Guilford County Register of Deeds office created a lot of excitement among historians and others interested in early Guilford County, by creating an online database of slave deeds that documented the sell of people rather than property. As an extension of that project, the Register of Deeds Office is now partnering with NC A&T State University’s History/Political Science Department and UNC-Greensboro’s People Not Property project to present a weekly community video interview series on ‘The Slave Deeds of Guilford County.’”

University of Nottingham: Major new database reveals slavery is still not illegal in half the world’s countries

University of Nottingham: Major new database reveals slavery is still not illegal in half the world’s countries. “A new global review of antislavery legislation has busted a popular misconception that slavery is now illegal in every country in the world. The Antislavery in Domestic Legislation Database has been compiled over the past five years and is launched today at the United Nations headquarters by the University of Nottingham’s Rights Lab in partnership with the Castan Centre for Human Rights (Monash University, Australia).”