Phys .org: New tool visualizes nature’s benefits worldwide

Phys .org: New tool visualizes nature’s benefits worldwide. “Nature supports people in critical ways, often at a highly local level. Wild bees buzz through farms, pollinating vegetables as they go. Nearby, wetlands might remove chemicals from the farm’s runoff, protecting a community drinking water source. In communities all around the world, nature’s contributions are constantly flowing to people. Scientists have mapped these contributions at local levels for years, but a new Stanford-led study puts these local analyses on an interactive global map that emphasizes nature’s declining ability to protect people from water pollution, coastal storms and under-pollinated crops.”

CBC: Saskatoon hopes new Google tool will help the city battle the effects of climate change

CBC: Saskatoon hopes new Google tool will help the city battle the effects of climate change. “City of Saskatoon officials hope new software designed by Google will provide more information in the city’s battle against climate change. The software tool, Environmental Insights Explorer, combines information from Google Maps with existing information about greenhouse gas emissions to paint a picture of a city’s environmental footprint.”

Cornell: CVM scientists develop online tool to guide wildlife repopulation efforts

Cornell: CVM scientists develop online tool to guide wildlife repopulation efforts. “Wildlife ecologists often turn to reintroduction programs to help sustain key species in certain habitats. While the wild turkey effort was a success, other long-term reintroduction programs struggle to see their species thrive. To help address this problem, a multidisciplinary team with the Cornell Wildlife Health Lab has created StaPOPd, an interactive online tool that tells users exactly how many plants or animals they need to introduce into a habitat in order to establish a stable population.”

AP: Virtual reality used to highlight uranium contamination

AP: Virtual reality used to highlight uranium contamination. “Activists are using virtual reality technology to focus on areas of the Navajo Nation affected by uranium contamination. The arts collective Bombshelltoe has collected 360-degree footage of Churchrock, New Mexico, to show how people and the land have changed since a 1979 uranium mill spill, Gallup Independent reports.”

Phys .org: Network of leading forest restoration experts features new website

Phys .org: Network of leading forest restoration experts features new website. “The new website highlights key findings from 60+ publications, synthesized into eight key messages. Key messages focus on livelihoods and well-being, local decision making, planting trees, natural regeneration, tree cover change, climate change, holistic vision, and guiding principles. The interactive website guides visitors to each message and provides short summaries of foundational research findings and free access to peer-reviewed publications, policy briefs, and educational modules.”

Snopes: Does Search Engine Ecosia Use Profits to Plant Trees?

Snopes: Does Search Engine Ecosia Use Profits to Plant Trees?. “For many people, this business model may seem ‘too good to be true’ and has led to some skepticism about the legitimacy of this company. A search on Google, for instance, results in several articles and blog posts questioning the legitimacy of the search engine and asking whether Ecosia is a scam. As far as we can tell, Ecosia is a legitimate search engine that truly uses a portion of its profits to help plant trees around the world.”