‘No Results Found’: Thousands of Climate Science Links Purged From USGS Online Database (EcoWatch)

EcoWatch: ‘No Results Found’: Thousands of Climate Science Links Purged From USGS Online Database. “Yet another U.S. agency has deleted climate change information from its website. This time, the U.S. Geological Survey’s ‘Science Explorer’ website—a tax-payer funded online database for the public to browse USGS science programs and activities—has been purged of thousands of formerly searchable climate science links.”

Reuters: Bunge, partners launch Brazil database to combat deforestation

Reuters: Bunge, partners launch Brazil database to combat deforestation. “Bunge Inc and partners on Tuesday launched an online database aimed at helping companies make investment and purchasing decisions that discourage farmers from cutting down trees for arable land. The Portuguese-language database … currently has data on Brazil’s Cerrado and will later include the Amazon region. The information can be used to assess the social and environmental risks of contributing to deforestation through soybean planting expansion in Brazil, the world’s largest exporter of the oilseeds.”

Unnatural Surveillance: How Online Data Is Putting Species at Risk (Yale)

Yale Environment 360: Unnatural Surveillance: How Online Data Is Putting Species at Risk. “The burgeoning pools of digital data from electronic tags, online scientific publications, ‘citizen science’ databases and the like – which have been an extraordinary boon to researchers and conservationists – can easily be misused by poachers and illegal collectors. Although a handful of scientists have recently raised concerns about it, the problem is so far poorly understood.”

Phys.org: Indigenous storytelling is a new asset for biocultural conservation

Phys.org: Indigenous storytelling is a new asset for biocultural conservation. “Some of the areas hosting most of the world’s biodiversity are those inhabited by indigenous peoples. In the same way that biodiversity is being eroded, so is the world’s cultural diversity. As a result, there have been several calls to promote biocultural conservation approaches that sustain both biodiversity and indigenous cultures.”

MIT Technology Review: Climate-Change Research Is Getting a Big Dose of AI

MIT Technology Review: Climate-Change Research Is Getting a Big Dose of AI. “Studying the climate is now a big-data problem, researchers say—and they’re enlisting artificial intelligence to help solve it. As a piece in Nature observes, everything from global-scale modeling efforts to individual weather forecasts are getting a boost from machine learning, as earth scientists have found themselves in need of computer assistance to make sense of the torrents of data their field is generating.”

The Next Web: Your social media use is helping scientists monitor the world’s ecosystems

The Next Web: Your social media use is helping scientists monitor the world’s ecosystems. “Smartphones and mobile internet connections have made it much easier for citizens to help gather scientific information. Examples of environmental monitoring apps include WilddogScan, Marine Debris Tracker, OakMapper and Journey North, which monitors the movements of Monarch butterflies. Meanwhile, social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Flickr host vast amounts of information. While not posted explicitly for environmental monitoring, social media posts from a place like the Great Barrier Reef can contain useful information about the health (or otherwise) of the environment there.”

WMTV (Wisconsin): DNR tool teaches communities about tree benefits

WMTV (Wisconsin): DNR tool teaches communities about tree benefits. “A new tool released by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources may help you save money by learning about the trees in your own backyard. The tool is an interactive map. It’s a massive database, which tracks the location of trees, size, and health condition. With that information it calculates how the tree can increase property values, improve air quality, and reduce storm damage and flooding.”