Audubon Magazine: These Century-Old Photos Inspired Some of the West’s First Bird Refuges

Audubon Magazine: These Century-Old Photos Inspired Some of the West’s First Bird Refuges. “The Oregon Historical Society and Oregon State University recently collaborated on a project to collect and digitize much of the work of [William Lovell] Finley and his colleagues. During 2016 and 2017 they digitized more than 6,800 images and more than 8,000 pages of manuscript materials. The small sampling featured here offers a fascinating inside look at the beginnings of the conservation movement.”

China .org: Salt lake database created in China

China .org: Salt lake database created in China. “China has built a database on salt lakes and environmental sciences, according to the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Tuesday. Creation of the database began in 2012. The CAS Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes says the database collects information on the environment, resources exploration,images and multimedia archives of salt lakes across the country.”

The National: New UAE national database to track hazardous and non-hazardous waste

The National: New UAE national database to track hazardous and non-hazardous waste. “A new national waste database has been launched by the Ministry of Climate Change and Environment. The bilingual system will compile and analyse data on waste generated across the country and track hazardous and non-hazardous waste levels. It will also create monthly and yearly reports on the amount of waste generated, treatment methods used and the percentage of treated waste in each emirate. It also will compare the output with national targets and global waste competitiveness indicators.”

Niche Canada: The Syllabus Project

Niche Canada: The Syllabus Project. “Has anyone else noticed how often environmental history syllabi largely omit women and scholars of colour? A colleague’s initial Twitter query about good sources for an environmental syllabus was followed by dozens of excellent suggestions—but none of those suggested sources were written by women and few were by scholars of colour. Dolly Jørgensen commented on this lack of diversity, and a lively Twitter discussion ensued about the structural reasons for underrepresentation. A discussion on the Women’s Environmental History Network (WEHN) email list occurred simultaneously, while the #WomenAlsoKnowHistory hashtag and website https://womenalsoknowhistory.com/ were in development.”

New York Times: Can a DNA Database Save the Trees? These Scientists Hope So

New York Times: Can a DNA Database Save the Trees? These Scientists Hope So. “Forests are disappearing. Maps show shrinking woodlands all over the world. Even trees coveted for their wood that are protected from logging are chopped down. Worried about such deforestation, environmental advocates are driving a project to create a DNA database of populations of the bigleaf maple tree on the West Coast. The eventual goal is to use DNA mapping to combat the thriving black markets for timber in tropical countries that are plagued by illegal logging.”

Gemini Research News: Global trade doubles material use for fashion, electronics over two decades

Gemini Research News: Global trade doubles material use for fashion, electronics over two decades. “A new database gives researchers — and potentially policymakers — the ability to see how global trade affects environmental impacts. Trade is one of the most visible hallmarks of 21st century life. Cheap shipping and global supply chains mean that goods made in one country can easily be shipped for purchase or consumption halfway around the world. But if you are trying to assess — and limit — the environmental impacts of this trade, how can you possibly measure the environmental effects of a dress made in Pakistan that’s purchased in Peoria? Buying that dress drives all sorts of environmental and social impacts in far-away countries where the raw materials are extracted or products are made.”