BBC News: The India fishermen using cheap smartphones to map the coast

BBC News: The India fishermen using cheap smartphones to map the coast. “Trapped between rising sea levels and development projects that are eating into the coastline of the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, fishing communities using cheap technology have taken matters into their own hands, reports Mahima A Jain. More than 40 fishing villages around Chennai (formerly Madras) have created land use maps using open source software and affordable technology. A land use map helps identify which areas of land are used for which purpose.”

TechCrunch: Google Street View cars will be roaming around the planet to check our air quality with these sensors

TechCrunch: Google Street View cars will be roaming around the planet to check our air quality with these sensors . “Google uses the Street View cars to map the land for Google Maps. Starting with 50 cars in Houston, Mexico City and Sydney, Aclima will capture air quality data by generating snapshots of carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), and particulate matter (PM2.5)while the Google cars roam the streets. The idea is to ascertain where there may be too much pollution and other breathing issues on a hyper local level in each metropolitan area. The data will then be made available as a public dataset on Google BigQuery.”

Phys .org: Updated California Climate Tracker tool provides more than 120 years of climate data

Phys .org: Updated California Climate Tracker tool provides more than 120 years of climate data. “Originally launched in 2009, the California Climate Tracker was designed to support climate monitoring in California and allows users to generate maps and graphs of temperature and precipitation by region. The 2018 upgrade incorporates substantial improvements including a more user-friendly web interface, improved accuracy of information based on PRISM data, and access to climate maps and data that go back more than 120 years, to 1895.”

Imperial College London: Marine ‘biodiversity crisis’ tackled with new database of conservation plans

Imperial College London: Marine ‘biodiversity crisis’ tackled with new database of conservation plans. “… researchers led by James Cook University, Imperial College London and the University of Maine have taken the first step towards a global repository by launching a database of marine conservation plans. A description of the database is published today in Biological Conservation.”

Fortune: Ever Wondered How Much Water Your Shower Uses? This New Google Tool Will Help You Find Out

Fortune: Ever Wondered How Much Water Your Shower Uses? This New Google Tool Will Help You Find Out. “Ever wondered how much water your shower uses? Or the impact of throwing away your food Google launched a new tool on Friday with the California Academy of Sciences, called Your Plan, Your Planet, which hopes to help you answer precisely those questions.”

NewsWise: Researchers win $3 million NSF grant to train teams of data detectives with ecological expertise

NewsWise: Researchers win $3 million NSF grant to train teams of data detectives with ecological expertise. “When it comes to how climate change is impacting ecosystems, there’s no shortage of data out there. But finding enough people who know both ecology and how to interpret that data can be a different story. A team at Northern Arizona University is wagering that more skilled interpreters can help make sense of this data deluge, and their idea just won a five-year, nearly $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation to train graduate students in tackling big ecological questions through informatics, collaboration and better communication.”

The Verge: The Secret Garden

The Verge: The Secret Garden. “The story of the Mount Lico expedition began six years ago when Bayliss, a conservation scientist and butterfly expert, happened to spy a small forest atop a mountain using Google Earth. It wasn’t the first time he’d found such a place; Bayliss had been using Google Earth to explore high-altitude rainforests in Africa for around 15 years. In February 2017, the time was finally right: Bayliss brought a drone to the base of the 410-foot sheer rock protuberance (technically known as an inselberg) to confirm that there was a forest on top. This was no small feat. The area surrounding Mount Lico is a patchwork of smallholder farms, tea and eucalyptus plantations, and woodlands. There are no paved roads, no hotels — just rivers to cross, plants to hack away with machetes, and miles of dirt track to navigate.”