Perkins+Will: Perkins+Will Launches Revamped Material Transparency Website and ‘Precautionary List’ of Hazardous Building Materials

Perkins+Will: Perkins+Will Launches Revamped Material Transparency Website and ‘Precautionary List’ of Hazardous Building Materials. “Perkins+Will, the global architecture and design firm that ignited the industry movement toward healthier building materials with its 2008 Precautionary List and 2011 Transparency website, unveiled today updated and improved versions of both tools. The enhanced Precautionary List—a compilation of the most prolific and problematic substances that people encounter every day in the built environment—now functions more like a user-friendly digital database than a static list. It allows design professionals to search for key substances and chemicals of concern using filters like project type, product type, and health and environmental impacts.”

The News Lens: The New Instagram Feed Spotlighting Mass Extinctions

The News Lens: The New Instagram Feed Spotlighting Mass Extinctions. “Everyone knows the Dodo is extinct. But how many of us know that we are currently undergoing a sixth mass extinction event? To raise awareness about this under-reported story, Brit photographer-filmmaker Sean Gallagher founded Everyday Extinction, a specialized Instagram feed on Oct 1.”

Now Available: Northwest Boreal Science and Management Research Tool

Discovered thanks to a nice e-mail from Steven J – the Northwest Boreal Science and Management Research Tool. From his e-mail: “The Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative is pleased to announce the launch of the Northwest Boreal Science and Management Research Tool. Explore thousands of curated scholarly articles, state and federal resource reports, land management plans, and more. Each entry includes geographic information about the area of study, allowing users to draw a box on a map to narrow searches to information directly related to a specific region in Alaska, the Yukon, British Columbia, and Northwest Territories. This project is a collaboration among Alaska Resources Library & Information Services (ARLIS), Alaska Climate Science Center, DataBasin, and Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative.”

Mongabay: Suite of free, open-source tools to help even non-experts monitor large-scale land use change

Mongabay: Suite of free, open-source tools to help even non-experts monitor large-scale land use change. “A recent study mapped the world’s dry forests using a relatively new tool that combines creative satellite image analysis with local- and national-scale knowledge. Natural resource agencies worldwide inventory their country’s vegetation cover, land uses, and forest carbon stocks in order to quantify the extent and impacts of land use change as well as their progress toward commitments to international treaties. However, they often lack the tools to compile and analyze the necessary data on land use change.”

new resource: national sustainable agriculture oral history archive (TIFOB)

New-to-me, from The Irresistible Fleet of Bicycles (really): new resource: national sustainable agriculture oral history archive. “The National Sustainable Agriculture Oral History Archive is a collection of interviews with people who have been instrumental in the development and implementation of public policies to advance sustainable agriculture in the United States. It was started in 2015 and has been growing ever since. Several of the interviews are with key members of the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (NSAC) and their interviews document the process of formation and evolution that has led to the NSAC that we know today. “

Phys.org: Students bring sixty years of data to life on the web

Phys.org: Students bring sixty years of data to life on the web . “For fields like environmental science, collecting data is hard. Gathering results on a single project can mean months of painstaking measurements, observations and notes, likely in limited conditions, hopefully to be published in a highly specialized journal with a target audience made up mostly of just other specialists in the field. That’s why when, this past summer, Duke students Devri Adams, Camila Restrepo and Annie Lott set out with Professor Emily Bernhardt to combine over six decades of data on the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest into a workable, aesthetically pleasing visualization website, they were really breaking new ground in the way the public can appreciate this truly massive store of information.”

Phys.org: Ninety-eight scientists launch a 2,000-year global temperature database

Phys.org: Ninety-eight scientists launch a 2,000-year global temperature database. “The culmination of three years of painstaking collaborative work, the PAGES2k 2,000 Year Multiproxy Database contains 692 records from 648 locations across the globe, including new additions from all continents and ocean basins. The records include trees, corals, glacier ice, lake and marine sediments, as well as documentary evidence. Together, they form the largest body of climate records with the highest temporal resolution available, ranging from the biweekly to the bicentennial.”