The Harvard Gazette: A red oak live tweets climate change

The Harvard Gazette: A red oak live tweets climate change. “Would it plead for rain in a drought? Fawn over a neighbor’s foliage? Crack jokes about how fast another tree loses its leaves in fall? It seems unlikely anyone will ever come across a loquacious linden. But for the arbor-curious, a red oak at the Harvard Forest in Petersham has been tweeting as @awitnesstree since July 17. Outfitted with sensors and cameras, and programmed with code that allows it to string together posts with prewritten bits of text, the Harvard Forest Witness Tree has been sharing on-the-ground insights into its own environmental life and that of its forest.”

StateScoop: Crowdsourced environment data gets a home on Louisville Data Commons

StateScoop: Crowdsourced environment data gets a home on Louisville Data Commons. “The ‘Louisville Data Commons’ repository, announced by the University of Louisville on Tuesday, is an open-data website that will incorporate data contributions from residents and researchers to keep track of the city’s environmental and health-related measurements. The community-gathered data will be available for research for a minimum of one year, according to the site, while some larger, frequently updated data sets will be available indefinitely.”

BBC: TikTok videos spread climate change awareness

BBC: TikTok videos spread climate change awareness. “Users of the social video app TikTok have been spreading a message of climate change awareness through make-up and time-lapse videos. Their chosen hashtag of #Globalwarning – a play on the term ‘global warming’ – has been viewed more than 24 million times on the app so far.”

Detroit Free Press: Michigan’s worst ‘environmental injustice’ areas ID’d

Detroit Free Press: Michigan’s worst ‘environmental injustice’ areas ID’d. “It’s a troubling combination for many Michigan residents: daily exposure to heightened environmental risks such as air and water pollution, heavy traffic and contaminated sites, and having those conditions particularly affect the most socially vulnerable populations — the poor, less educated, sometimes with limited English language skills.”

Department of Environmental Conservation, New York: DEC Launches New ‘DECinfo Locator’ to Increase Transparency and Access to Data and Reports

Department of Environmental Conservation, New York: DEC Launches New ‘DECinfo Locator’ to Increase Transparency and Access to Data and Reports. “With more than 50 interactive data layers, DECinfo Locator lets users see and download permits, former industrial site cleanup plans, water quality reports, and more based on where they live, work, or play. Selecting a map feature can bring up links to database records for petroleum bulk storage facilities, oil wells, or permitted mines…. The map’s Near Me feature lets users narrow data results by creating an interactive list of data points within an area of up to 10 miles from a selected point. In addition to environmental quality information, users can explore new places for recreation such as hiking, cross-country skiing, or mountain biking, or look up the rules for a nearby Wildlife Management Area.”

National Geographic: Do We Know Enough About The Deep Sea To Mine It?

National Geographic: Do We Know Enough About The Deep Sea To Mine It?. “The United Nations organisation [International Seabed Authority (ISA)] headquartered in Kingston, Jamaica, is charged with promoting the mining of the ocean floor while, contradictorily, ensuring its protection. That’s about to change. As the ISA meets this month to draft regulations to allow mining to begin, it is set to unveil a public database that contains all environmental data reported by the miners since 2001. For the first time, scientists will be able to analyse the quantity and quality of that information and determine if mining contractors have complied with ISA rules.”

BBC: Scotland-led study into plastic pollution impact on birds

BBC: Scotland-led study into plastic pollution impact on birds . “Pictures of birds entangled in plastic and nests built with the waste are being collected by Scottish researchers. They want people from around the world to contribute to the ‘citizen science’ project by uploading their images to a new website.”