Griffith University: EcoCommons – mapping the future in environmentally challenging times

Griffith University: EcoCommons – mapping the future in environmentally challenging times. “Griffith University is driving the construction of EcoCommons, a world-first collaborative platform for analysing and modelling ecological and environmental challenges. As its major partner, Griffith University’s eResearch Services is hosting the EcoCommons development project team with half of EcoCommon’s $5.2 million funding awarded to Griffith’s Climate Change Response Program.”

The Next Web: Your social media use is helping scientists monitor the world’s ecosystems

The Next Web: Your social media use is helping scientists monitor the world’s ecosystems. “Smartphones and mobile internet connections have made it much easier for citizens to help gather scientific information. Examples of environmental monitoring apps include WilddogScan, Marine Debris Tracker, OakMapper and Journey North, which monitors the movements of Monarch butterflies. Meanwhile, social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Flickr host vast amounts of information. While not posted explicitly for environmental monitoring, social media posts from a place like the Great Barrier Reef can contain useful information about the health (or otherwise) of the environment there.”

UPI: Schwarzenegger launches climate change project

UPI: Schwarzenegger launches climate change project. “Actor and former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Friday unveiled an environmental initiative to answer President Donald Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris climate accords. Called the Digital Environmental Legislative Handbook, it is a searchable database of environmental bills and laws designed to help legislators create their own climate change laws.”

Geopolitical Monitor: Vietnam’s Social Media Shaping New Environmentalism

Geopolitical Monitor: Vietnam’s Social Media Shaping New Environmentalism. “[Tran Thi Thuy] Binh, along with 40 million other net-savvy young Vietnamese, appears to be part of a rising tide of environmental nationalism sweeping the nation. What’s most surprising is that Facebook, once banned in Vietnam, has now proven to be an attractive platform for organizing environment rallies. With a population of 93 million and an increasing Internet user base, social media has proven to be the first choice among the educated Vietnamese youth.”