Due to COVID-19 is documenting the signage of our times

Thank you to Esther S. for dropping this in my email. Due to COVID-19, at https://duetocovid19.com/ , is archiving the signage used right now. From the front page: “During the coronavirus pandemic, daily life has come to a sudden standstill and businesses have had to respond. Signs on storefronts announce operational changes but these messages are also brimming over with solidarity, shared responsibility, and cautious optimism. This project attempts to document the temporary signs that have gone up across our communities. This archive features 1260 sign photos from 118 cities across the world.”

New Database: George Floyd & Anti-Racist Street Art

Spotted via Reddit: George Floyd & Anti-Racist Street Art. From the About page: “The Urban Art Mapping George Floyd and Anti-Racist Street Art database seeks to document examples of street art from around the world that have emerged in the aftermath of the murder of George Floyd as part of an ongoing movement demanding social justice and equality. The database will serve as repository for images and a future resource for scholars and artists by way of metadata that is freely available. In addition, the project will make possible an analysis of the themes and issues that appear in street art, explored in relation to local experiences, responses, and attitudes.”

ABC News: Smithsonian museums collecting White House protest signs to preserve slice of history

ABC News: Smithsonian museums collecting White House protest signs to preserve slice of history. “Several museums moved to preserve a slice of history in Washington on Wednesday by taking steps to keep some of the signs protesters strung along a fence near the White House after the death of George Floyd.”

Londonist: The Home Of Black British History Is Creating A New Archive – With Your Help

Londonist: The Home Of Black British History Is Creating A New Archive – With Your Help. “Black Cultural Archives is the only national heritage centre dedicated to collecting and sharing the stories and histories of African and Caribbean people in Britain — check out examples from their amazing archives here. Now they’re crowdsourcing material to document the Black Lives Matter movement and protests of 2020: this is your chance to make sure that the records that future generations will have available to them of this time will reflect the reality.”

Canberra Times: The National Library of Australia has a fascinating collection of performing arts scrapbooks now available to view online

Canberra Times: The National Library of Australia has a fascinating collection of performing arts scrapbooks now available to view online. “Eighteen scrapbooks of our theatrical past contain insights into performances by Dame Nellie Melba, concerts by the Essendon Musical Society and the acts of circus and vaudeville performers. They were compiled by a number of dedicated and, sometimes, unknown fans across the late 18th to the mid to late 20th centuries. The scrapbooks contain images, programs, advertisements, tickets, reviews and news clippings of and for a great number of theatre, vaudeville, ballet and opera performances.”

Mixmag Asia: ​Desa Potato Head unveils an online archive of 4,000+ pieces of rave ephemera

Mixmag Asia: ​Desa Potato Head unveils an online archive of 4,000+ pieces of rave ephemera. “Steve Terry’s Wild Life Archive is a world-renowned collection of ephemera, books, magazines and other related artefacts documenting dance music culture from its early origins all the way through to today’s global scene. 25 years in the making, the collection is made up of more than 4,000 items that date back to the early 1970s from as far as Paradise Garage and Hacienda to Berghain and Dekmantel.”

University of Southern Maine: USM historian invites public to contribute to online archive of COVID-19 signs

I am not covering every single university and institution doing a coronavirus-related archive because frankly if I did it would take all my time. But I will make an exception for this one because a) it’s specific and not just a “national memory” archive and b) I’m a sucker for ephemera. University of Southern Maine: USM historian invites public to contribute to online archive of COVID-19 signs. “Some of the fleeting Maine images of COVID-19 — of light-up marquees, lawn signs and storefront warnings — are being collected in an online archive by the University of Southern Maine. The crowd-sourced archive, titled ‘Signs of the Times: Documenting Covid-19 Signs in Southern Maine,’ currently consists of about 200 photos. But creator Libby Bischof, a history professor and the executive director of the Osher Map Library and Smith Center for Cartographic Education at the University of Southern Maine, thinks many more signs are out there.”

Washingtonian: These Excellent Covid-19 Posters Are Both Beautiful and Beneficial

Washingtonian: These Excellent Covid-19 Posters Are Both Beautiful and Beneficial. “The Viral Art Project is a virtual art gallery that invites graphic designers and artists to submit original poster designs that respond visually to the Covid-19 pandemic. The idea is to raise awareness of the challenges facing the world while also promoting messages of hope and security. The results so far have been striking—an ever-growing collection of posters that demonstrate how powerful typography and graphic design can be.”

Toronto Star: Toronto Public Library and friends remix wartime posters for the pandemic

Toronto Star: Toronto Public Library and friends remix wartime posters for the pandemic. “‘Keep These Hands Off!’ the Second World War poster implores, urging people to buy victory bonds as a mother and baby cower from the gnarled hands of the enemy. ‘Keep These Hands Off!’ the pandemic version of the poster echoes, as the same mother and baby cower, but with masks. ‘Who knows what, or who you touched.’ The Toronto Public Library has more than 100 wartime posters in its digital collection and, last week, they asked people to remix them ‘to speak to the new historic moment we’re in.'”

National Library of New Zealand: Catching and describing the passing breeze

National Library of New Zealand: Catching and describing the passing breeze. “Ephemera, ‘relating to the day’, published to be of transitory use and then thrown away — such material creates a challenge for the librarian or archivist. How to collect and preserve Ephemera for future researchers? Thankfully, the Library is rising to the challenge, now not only in analogue formats but in the digital environment.”

Just Launched: Vaccination in Modern America: Misinformation vs. Public Health Advocacy Web Archive (Columbia University Libraries)

Columbia University Libraries: Just Launched: Vaccination in Modern America: Misinformation vs. Public Health Advocacy Web Archive. “Developed by librarians within the Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation, the archive preserves webpages representing the current state of public discourse and contrasting approaches to authority on vaccination in the United States, with a focus on sites that are both pro- and anti-vaccination. The purpose of this collection is to capture potentially ephemeral information about vaccination that could be used by health service researchers, information scientists, sociologists, and others to understand the motivations, practices, and outcomes of health information and information on the web.”

Social Adhesion: New Museum Dedicated to the History of Stickers (Core77)

Core77: Social Adhesion: New Museum Dedicated to the History of Stickers. “To several generations’ worth of youth, stickers were the fastest way to prettify something, vandalize something or establish some attempt at identity by slapping favorite brands or subversive messages onto notebooks and laptops….To celebrate their stock-and-trade, StickerYou is launching the History of Stickers Museum at their home base in Toronto (which is the largest sticker store in the world), kicking it off with a permanent art exhibition called Stickers: RePEELed.”

New York Academy of Medicine Launches Hospital Postcard Pilot Project

The New York Academy of Medicine has launched a new collection of hospital postcards. (Thanks for letting me know, Carrie!) “This pilot project represents a small portion of the NYC sub-collection of the Robert Matz Hospital postcards digitized by the New York Academy of Medicine Library. It showcases 118 hospital postcards from New York City. Hospitals from all five boroughs (Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island) are represented, including public, private, not-for-profit, government, and military hospitals.” The entire collection is about 2000 postcards.

Reddit: I’ve created The Poster Database – A movie and tv show poster website containing over 35,000 high-quality posters

Reddit: I’ve created The Poster Database – A movie and tv show poster website containing over 35,000 high-quality posters. “The Poster Database is a custom-built platform for all posters lovers worldwide! We’re currently focusing on media items like Collections, Movies, and Shows but we have some rich plans for the future to expand even further and maybe throw some other goodies along the way 😉 With the launch back in August 2019, we’ve had amazing support from various communities help contribute to the site and bring us to where we are today with over 35K uploaded posters growing!!”

Blake’s Sanctum: SEGA MegaZone Preservation Archive NEEDS YOUR HELP!

Blake’s Sanctum: SEGA MegaZone Preservation Archive NEEDS YOUR HELP!. “Being an Australian magazine (presumably with no international distribution) this great old magazine and piece of video game history from the early to mid 90s, arguably the greatest era in retro gaming due to the 16bit console wars and the rise of mainstream PC gaming (Point & click adventures, 1st person shooters, and RTS+TBS strategy games) has sadly disappeared into near obscurity with only a small internet presence and a few mangy old mags occasionally appearing on ebay. There is currently NO COMPLETE DIGITAL RECORD OF THIS MAGAZINE IN EXISTENCE. I want to try and change that…”