‘Decoupling’: The COVID-19 trend doctors hope to see in 2022 (WBNS)

WBNS: ‘Decoupling’: The COVID-19 trend doctors hope to see in 2022. “Over 2020 and 2021, we’ve seen the pattern of waves. When cases increase, we see the number of hospitalizations go up as well. Unfortunately, when there’s an increase in hospitalizations, the number of deaths has gone up. Eventually the waves peak, crest, and the numbers decrease again. With omicron, we are going to see more cases. However, as more people get vaccines and boosters, will that be enough to ease the hospitalizations and deaths?”

New York Times: How 700 Epidemiologists Are Living Now, and What They Think Is Next

New York Times: How 700 Epidemiologists Are Living Now, and What They Think Is Next. “Even with coronavirus vaccines on the way, many epidemiologists do not expect their lives to return to pre-pandemic normal until most Americans are vaccinated. In the meantime, most have eased up on some precautions — now going to the grocery store or seeing friends outdoors, for example — but are as cautious as ever about many activities of daily life.”

New York Times: What 635 Epidemiologists Are Doing for Thanksgiving

New York Times: What 635 Epidemiologists Are Doing for Thanksgiving. “The family of one epidemiologist plans to celebrate Thanksgiving in a garage, with tables 10 feet apart and the doors rolled up. Another epidemiologist’s family is forgoing a traditional meal for an outdoor hot cider toast with neighbors. A third is dining in an outdoor tent, with a heater, humidifier and air purifier running. And, according to an informal survey of 635 epidemiologists by The New York Times, the large majority are not celebrating with people outside their household.”

Epidemiology’s Time of Need: COVID-19 Calls for Epidemic-Related Economics (American Economic Association)

American Economic Association: Epidemiology’s Time of Need: COVID-19 Calls for Epidemic-Related Economics. “The COVID-19 pandemic has catapulted scientific conversations and scientific divisions into the public consciousness. Epidemiology and economics have long operated in distinct silos, but the COVID-19 pandemic presents a complex and cross-disciplinary problem that impacts all facets of society. Many economists have recognized this and want to engage in efforts to mitigate and control the pandemic, but others seem more interested in attacking epidemiology than attacking the virus. As an epidemiologist, I call upon economists to join with us in combating COVID-19 and in preventing future pandemics.”

BBC: Cheaper to prevent pandemics than ‘cure’ them

BBC: Cheaper to prevent pandemics than ‘cure’ them. “The world needs a new approach to prevent future pandemics killing millions more victims, a report says. It says contact between people, wildlife and livestock must be curbed to cut the risk of bacteria and viruses crossing from animals to humans. Health care should be provided for people living close to animals in high-risk areas. This would help stop outbreaks of disease before they have a chance to spread more widely.”

CNN: How coronavirus affects the entire body

CNN: How coronavirus affects the entire body. “Coronavirus damages not only the lungs, but the kidneys, liver, heart, brain and nervous system, skin and gastrointestinal tract, doctors said Friday in a review of reports about Covid-19 patients. The team at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center in New York City — one of the hospitals flooded with patients in the spring — went through their own experiences and collected reports from other medical teams around the world.”

Summit Daily (Colorado): Polis announces interactive COVID-19 model

Summit Daily (Colorado): Polis announces interactive COVID-19 model. “The website… lets people play epidemiologist by changing various scenarios to see how the state would be able to handle the virus. On the website, people can drag sliders with various metrics, including the number of people under 65 social distancing, the proportion of the population that wears a mask and how quickly contacts are successfully traced after a case report. The website then shows the viewer a graph detailing the number of estimated non-ICU hospitalizations, critical care hospitalization and deaths.”

Intelligencer: An Epidemiologist’s Lessons From the ACT UP Era, for Today’s Protesters

Intelligencer: An Epidemiologist’s Lessons From the ACT UP Era, for Today’s Protesters. “As demonstrations against police brutality engulfed the country, over a thousand public-health professionals came out in support of the protests in an open letter. One person who signed was Gregg Gonsalves, a professor of epidemiology at Yale and MacArthur genius who is no stranger to protest movements.”

New York Times: When 511 Epidemiologists Expect to Fly, Hug and Do 18 Other Everyday Activities Again

New York Times: When 511 Epidemiologists Expect to Fly, Hug and Do 18 Other Everyday Activities Again. “Many epidemiologists are already comfortable going to the doctor, socializing with small groups outside or bringing in mail, despite the coronavirus. But unless there’s an effective vaccine or treatment first, it will be more than a year before many say they will be willing to go to concerts, sporting events or religious services. And some may never greet people with hugs or handshakes again.”

Phys .org: Scientists develop method to help epidemiologists map spread of COVID-19

Phys .org: Scientists develop method to help epidemiologists map spread of COVID-19. “Rochester Institute of Technology scientists have developed a method they believe will help epidemiologists more efficiently predict the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Their new study, published in Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena, outlines a solution to the SIR epidemic model, which is commonly used to predict how many people are susceptible to, infected by, and recovered from viral epidemics.”

The New Yorker: Seattle’s Leaders Let Scientists Take the Lead. New York’s Did Not

The New Yorker: Seattle’s Leaders Let Scientists Take the Lead. New York’s Did Not. “Epidemiology is a science of possibilities and persuasion, not of certainties or hard proof. ‘Being approximately right most of the time is better than being precisely right occasionally,’ the Scottish epidemiologist John Cowden wrote, in 2010. ‘You can only be sure when to act in retrospect.’ Epidemiologists must persuade people to upend their lives—to forgo travel and socializing, to submit themselves to blood draws and immunization shots—even when there’s scant evidence that they’re directly at risk. Epidemiologists also must learn how to maintain their persuasiveness even as their advice shifts. ”

Arizona State University: Novel coronavirus detected, monitored in wastewater

Arizona State University: Novel coronavirus detected, monitored in wastewater. “Within weeks of arriving on the world stage, SARS-CoV-2 has managed to encircle the globe, leaving illness, mortality and economic devastation in its wake. One of the central challenges facing health authorities and the medical community has been testing for the elusive virus on a sufficiently comprehensive scale. A new approach to monitoring the novel coronavirus (as well as other dangerous pathogens and chemical agents) is being developed and refined. Known as wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE), the method mines sewage samples for vital clues about human health. It can potentially identify levels of coronavirus infection at both a local and global scale.”

Coronavirus: three misconceptions about how animals transmit diseases debunked (The Conversation)

The Conversation: Coronavirus: three misconceptions about how animals transmit diseases debunked. This article was written by a lecturer in epidemiology at the University of Cambridge. “Zoonotic diseases are caused by pathogens which originate in other animal species. Some diseases, such as rabies, cause sporadic outbreaks, often self-contained but deadly and traumatising for the communities they infect. Others manage to spread worldwide and become pandemic, circulating in the global population. Some are repeat offenders that re-emerge from animal hosts in a mutated form every few decades – think influenza, plague and cholera. Many others are now part of our burden of endemic diseases, such as measles, mumps or HIV. The coronavirus causing COVID-19 is closely related to those that caused the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) pandemic in 2003. Despite speculation, it’s too early to tell whether COVID-19 will disappear within a year or stay with us permanently like the flu.”

Washington Post: The coronavirus isn’t mutating quickly, suggesting a vaccine would offer lasting protection

Washington Post: The coronavirus isn’t mutating quickly, suggesting a vaccine would offer lasting protection. “The coronavirus is not mutating significantly as it circulates through the human population, according to scientists who are closely studying the novel pathogen’s genetic code. That relative stability suggests the virus is less likely to become more or less dangerous as it spreads, and represents encouraging news for researchers hoping to create a long-lasting vaccine.”