CNN: How coronavirus affects the entire body

CNN: How coronavirus affects the entire body. “Coronavirus damages not only the lungs, but the kidneys, liver, heart, brain and nervous system, skin and gastrointestinal tract, doctors said Friday in a review of reports about Covid-19 patients. The team at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center in New York City — one of the hospitals flooded with patients in the spring — went through their own experiences and collected reports from other medical teams around the world.”

Summit Daily (Colorado): Polis announces interactive COVID-19 model

Summit Daily (Colorado): Polis announces interactive COVID-19 model. “The website… lets people play epidemiologist by changing various scenarios to see how the state would be able to handle the virus. On the website, people can drag sliders with various metrics, including the number of people under 65 social distancing, the proportion of the population that wears a mask and how quickly contacts are successfully traced after a case report. The website then shows the viewer a graph detailing the number of estimated non-ICU hospitalizations, critical care hospitalization and deaths.”

Intelligencer: An Epidemiologist’s Lessons From the ACT UP Era, for Today’s Protesters

Intelligencer: An Epidemiologist’s Lessons From the ACT UP Era, for Today’s Protesters. “As demonstrations against police brutality engulfed the country, over a thousand public-health professionals came out in support of the protests in an open letter. One person who signed was Gregg Gonsalves, a professor of epidemiology at Yale and MacArthur genius who is no stranger to protest movements.”

New York Times: When 511 Epidemiologists Expect to Fly, Hug and Do 18 Other Everyday Activities Again

New York Times: When 511 Epidemiologists Expect to Fly, Hug and Do 18 Other Everyday Activities Again. “Many epidemiologists are already comfortable going to the doctor, socializing with small groups outside or bringing in mail, despite the coronavirus. But unless there’s an effective vaccine or treatment first, it will be more than a year before many say they will be willing to go to concerts, sporting events or religious services. And some may never greet people with hugs or handshakes again.”

Phys .org: Scientists develop method to help epidemiologists map spread of COVID-19

Phys .org: Scientists develop method to help epidemiologists map spread of COVID-19. “Rochester Institute of Technology scientists have developed a method they believe will help epidemiologists more efficiently predict the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Their new study, published in Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena, outlines a solution to the SIR epidemic model, which is commonly used to predict how many people are susceptible to, infected by, and recovered from viral epidemics.”

The New Yorker: Seattle’s Leaders Let Scientists Take the Lead. New York’s Did Not

The New Yorker: Seattle’s Leaders Let Scientists Take the Lead. New York’s Did Not. “Epidemiology is a science of possibilities and persuasion, not of certainties or hard proof. ‘Being approximately right most of the time is better than being precisely right occasionally,’ the Scottish epidemiologist John Cowden wrote, in 2010. ‘You can only be sure when to act in retrospect.’ Epidemiologists must persuade people to upend their lives—to forgo travel and socializing, to submit themselves to blood draws and immunization shots—even when there’s scant evidence that they’re directly at risk. Epidemiologists also must learn how to maintain their persuasiveness even as their advice shifts. ”

Arizona State University: Novel coronavirus detected, monitored in wastewater

Arizona State University: Novel coronavirus detected, monitored in wastewater. “Within weeks of arriving on the world stage, SARS-CoV-2 has managed to encircle the globe, leaving illness, mortality and economic devastation in its wake. One of the central challenges facing health authorities and the medical community has been testing for the elusive virus on a sufficiently comprehensive scale. A new approach to monitoring the novel coronavirus (as well as other dangerous pathogens and chemical agents) is being developed and refined. Known as wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE), the method mines sewage samples for vital clues about human health. It can potentially identify levels of coronavirus infection at both a local and global scale.”

Coronavirus: three misconceptions about how animals transmit diseases debunked (The Conversation)

The Conversation: Coronavirus: three misconceptions about how animals transmit diseases debunked. This article was written by a lecturer in epidemiology at the University of Cambridge. “Zoonotic diseases are caused by pathogens which originate in other animal species. Some diseases, such as rabies, cause sporadic outbreaks, often self-contained but deadly and traumatising for the communities they infect. Others manage to spread worldwide and become pandemic, circulating in the global population. Some are repeat offenders that re-emerge from animal hosts in a mutated form every few decades – think influenza, plague and cholera. Many others are now part of our burden of endemic diseases, such as measles, mumps or HIV. The coronavirus causing COVID-19 is closely related to those that caused the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) pandemic in 2003. Despite speculation, it’s too early to tell whether COVID-19 will disappear within a year or stay with us permanently like the flu.”

Washington Post: The coronavirus isn’t mutating quickly, suggesting a vaccine would offer lasting protection

Washington Post: The coronavirus isn’t mutating quickly, suggesting a vaccine would offer lasting protection. “The coronavirus is not mutating significantly as it circulates through the human population, according to scientists who are closely studying the novel pathogen’s genetic code. That relative stability suggests the virus is less likely to become more or less dangerous as it spreads, and represents encouraging news for researchers hoping to create a long-lasting vaccine.”

Neowin: An AI epidemiologist was among the first to break news of the coronavirus outbreak in China

Neowin: An AI epidemiologist was among the first to break news of the coronavirus outbreak in China. “Near the end of the first week of January, news of a deadly flu outbreak in Wuhan, China started coming to mainstream media. The disease that started out from Wuhan has now spread to mainland China and to other parts of the world with confirmed cases in the United States and potential threats in the United Kingdom and other countries. Among the first reporters was BlueDot, which started notifying its customers of an impending outbreak as early as December 31.”

The Healthy Cognitive Aging Project: A major data resource for cognitive epidemiology (National Institute on Aging)

National Institute on Aging: The Healthy Cognitive Aging Project: A major data resource for cognitive epidemiology . “Anybody who has ever loved, lived with, or cared for a person with Alzheimer’s disease or its related dementias knows that its effects are multifaceted, complex, and often difficult to predict. That’s why NIA’s longitudinal aging studies are so important—they can provide prospective data on these as-yet incompletely understood points. This week, we are proud to announce the first public release of data from the Healthy Cognitive Aging Project (HCAP), a nationally representative study that will help shed light on how and when cognitive decline progresses in older adults.”

University of California San Francisco: ‘10,000 Immunomes’ Database Opens a Window on Healthy Immunity

University of California San Francisco: ‘10,000 Immunomes’ Database Opens a Window on Healthy Immunity. “Scientists at UC San Francisco have painstakingly assembled a searchable database of normal human immunity that researchers can now use as an instant comparison group in studies of the immune system and immune dysfunction. The new open-access data tool, called the 10,000 Immunomes Project (10KIP), pieces together the results of 83 studies that contain measurements on healthy people of various ages and backgrounds.”

Washington Post: How prepared is the world for the next epidemic? This tool shows most countries are not.

Washington Post: How prepared is the world for the next epidemic? This tool shows most countries are not.. “Public health officials and business leaders like Bill Gates have long warned that the world is not ready for the next pandemic. Now an initiative led by Tom Frieden, former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has developed a tool that spotlights gaps in preparedness, and actions that countries and organizations can take to close them. The new website…gives an individual score to each country and uses color codes to rank the world by five levels of preparedness.”

University of Pennsylvania: New Open-access Data Resource Aims to Bolster Collaboration in Global Infectious Disease Research

University of Pennsylvania: New Open-access Data Resource Aims to Bolster Collaboration in Global Infectious Disease Research. “A single epidemiological study—tracking the acquisition of functional resistance to malaria, or the relationship of diarrheal disease to developmental outcomes—may involve tens of thousands of clinical observations on thousands of participants from multiple countries. To overcome these hurdles, an international team of researchers has launched the Clinical Epidemiology Database, an open-access online resource enabling investigators to maximize the utility and reach of their data and to make optimal use of information released by others.”