TechCrunch: Supermicro says investigation firm found no spy chips

TechCrunch: Supermicro says investigation firm found no spy chips. “Supermicro has sent a letter to its customers saying that it has found no evidence of malicious chips on its motherboards. The company asked third-party company Nardello & Co. to audit Supermicro’s hardware. On October 4, a Bloomberg report claimed that China’s spies managed to conceal tiny malicious chips on Supermicro motherboards. Those chips would then end up in data centers operated by Supermicro customers, such as Amazon and Apple.”

CNET: Russian hacking tool gets extra stealthy to target US, European computers

CNET: Russian hacking tool gets extra stealthy to target US, European computers. “Russian hackers have a new tool up their sleeve to gain access to sensitive computers without getting caught, cybersecurity experts say. And they’re using it to target US and European government entities, as well as a former territory of the Soviet Union.”

AP News: In online ruse, fake journalists tried to hack Saudi critic

AP News: In online ruse, fake journalists tried to hack Saudi critic. “Hackers impersonating journalists tried to intercept the communications of a prominent Saudi opposition figure in Washington, The Associated Press has found. One attempt involved the fabrication of a fake BBC secretary and an elaborate television interview request; the other involved the impersonation of slain Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi to deliver a malicious link.”

Ars Technica: How did Iran find CIA spies? They Googled it

Ars Technica: How did Iran find CIA spies? They Googled it. “A covert ‘transitional’ channel used for communicating with sources that Central Intelligence Agency handlers couldn’t reach directly was exposed and infiltrated by Iranian intelligence in 2009. The breakdown in operational security—which apparently relied heavily on security through obscurity—was the result of Iranian intelligence officials simply using Google to locate the websites used as the communications channel after a double-agent exposed the method used by the CIA, according to a report from Yahoo News’ Zach Dorfman and Jenna McLaughlin.”

CNET: Twitter employee may have spied on users for Saudis, says report

CNET: Twitter employee may have spied on users for Saudis, says report. “Western intelligence officials notified Twitter that an employee had been co-opted by Saudi Arabia several years ago to spy on the accounts of users critical of the government, The New York Times reported on Saturday. Officials alerted Twitter to the alleged Saudi mole in late 2015, prompting the company to investigate, according to the Times report, which cited anonymous sources.”

The Atlantic: Social Media Is Revolutionizing Warfare

The Atlantic: Social Media Is Revolutionizing Warfare. “‘The exponential explosion of publicly available information is changing the global intelligence system … It’s changing how we tool, how we organize, how we institutionalize—everything we do.’ This is what a former high-level intelligence official told us back in the summer of 2016, explaining how the people who collect secrets—professional spies—were adjusting to a world increasingly without secrets. We were asking him about one of the most important changes in technology and politics today: the rising power of social media. “

Ars Technica: NYT sues FCC, says it hid evidence of Russia meddling in net neutrality repeal

Ars Technica: NYT sues FCC, says it hid evidence of Russia meddling in net neutrality repeal. “The New York Times has sued the Federal Communications Commission over the agency’s refusal to release records that the Times believes might shed light on Russian interference in the net neutrality repeal proceeding.”