AP: Russian hack brings changes, uncertainty to US court system

AP: Russian hack brings changes, uncertainty to US court system. “Trial lawyer Robert Fisher is handling one of America’s most prominent counterintelligence cases, defending an MIT scientist charged with secretly helping China. But how he’ll handle the logistics of the case could feel old school: Under new court rules, he’ll have to print out any highly sensitive documents and hand-deliver them to the courthouse. Until recently, even the most secretive material — about wiretaps, witnesses and national security concerns – could be filed electronically. But that changed after the massive Russian hacking campaign that breached the U.S. court system’s electronic case files and those of scores of other federal agencies and private companies.”

Google Blog: New campaign targeting security researchers

Google Blog: New campaign targeting security researchers. “Over the past several months, the Threat Analysis Group has identified an ongoing campaign targeting security researchers working on vulnerability research and development at different companies and organizations. The actors behind this campaign, which we attribute to a government-backed entity based in North Korea, have employed a number of means to target researchers which we will outline below.”

CNET: Russia blamed for SolarWinds hack in joint FBI, NSA and CISA statement

CNET: Russia blamed for SolarWinds hack in joint FBI, NSA and CISA statement. “Key government intelligence agencies said Tuesday that the SolarWinds hack is ‘likely Russian in origin,’ according to a joint statement from the FBI, NSA, Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency and Office of the Director of National Intelligence. It’s the first time the four agencies have attributed the cyber attack to Russia.”

Associated Press: Hacked networks will need to be burned ‘down to the ground’

Associated Press: Hacked networks will need to be burned ‘down to the ground’. “Experts say there simply are not enough skilled threat-hunting teams to duly identify all the government and private-sector systems that may have been hacked. FireEye, the cybersecurity company that discovered the intrusion into U.S. agencies and was among the victims, has already tallied dozens of casualties. It’s racing to identify more.”

Washington Post: The U.S. government spent billions on a system for detecting hacks. The Russians outsmarted it.

Washington Post: The U.S. government spent billions on a system for detecting hacks. The Russians outsmarted it.. “When Russian hackers first slipped their digital Trojan horses into federal government computer systems, probably sometime in the spring, they sat dormant for days, doing nothing but hiding. Then the malicious code sprang into action and began communicating with the outside world…. Why then, when computer networks at the State Department and other federal agencies started signaling to Russian servers, did nobody in the U.S. government notice that something odd was afoot? The answer is part Russian skill, part federal government blind spot.”

US cyber-attack: Around 50 firms ‘genuinely impacted’ by massive breach (BBC)

BBC: US cyber-attack: Around 50 firms ‘genuinely impacted’ by massive breach. “The cyber-security firm that identified the large-scale hacking of US government agencies says it ‘genuinely impacted’ around 50 organisations. Kevin Mandia, CEO of FireEye, said that while some 18,000 organisations had the malicious code in their networks, it was the 50 who suffered major breaches.”

The Hacker News: New Evidence Suggests SolarWinds’ Codebase Was Hacked to Inject Backdoor

The Hacker News: New Evidence Suggests SolarWinds’ Codebase Was Hacked to Inject Backdoor. “A new report published by ReversingLabs today and shared in advance with The Hacker News has revealed that the operators behind the espionage campaign likely managed to compromise the software build and code signing infrastructure of SolarWinds Orion platform as early as October 2019 to deliver the malicious backdoor through its software release process.”

Seattle Times: US looking into possible computer hacks of federal agencies

Seattle Times: US looking into possible computer hacks of federal agencies. “Hackers got into computers at the U.S. Treasury Department and possibly other federal agencies, touching off a government response involving the National Security Council. Security Council spokesperson John Ullyot said Sunday that the government is aware of reports about the hacks. ‘We are taking all necessary steps to identify and remedy any possible issues related to this situation,’ he wrote in an email.”

ComputerWorld: Windows hackers target COVID-19 vaccine efforts

ComputerWorld: Windows hackers target COVID-19 vaccine efforts. “I’ve written before about how during the coronavirus pandemic, hackers have increasingly exploited Windows vulnerabilities to trick people into downloading malware and ransomware to get fast, easy money. With a recent upsurge of attacks, things are getting worse. And this time around it’s different — people may die from COVID-19 because of the attacks.”

ABC News: DOJ announces charges against 6 Russian military officers allegedly involved in hacking, malware operations

ABC News: DOJ announces charges against 6 Russian military officers allegedly involved in hacking, malware operations. “The indictment specifically accuses the six alleged hackers of engaging in computer intrusions ‘intended to support Russian government efforts to undermine, retaliate against or otherwise destabilize’ Ukraine, Georgia, elections in France, the 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games and international efforts to hold Russia accountable for its use of the nerve agent Novichok on foreign soil.”