The Sunday Times: Students use AI rewrite tool to beat plagiarism checks

The Sunday Times: Students use AI rewrite tool to beat plagiarism checks. “The 18th-century magnum opus by the economist Adam Smith is commonly known as The Wealth of Nations. It was when a student referred in an essay to The Abundance of Countries that his professor smelled a rat. Academics have warned that students are cheating in their essays by using artificially intelligent programs that paraphrase the work of others in a way that cannot be picked up by web tools that check for plagiarism.”

Fairfield University: Grad Students Publish Essays Co-Authored by Artificial Intelligence Tool

Fairfield University: Grad Students Publish Essays Co-Authored by Artificial Intelligence Tool. “To co-author their essays with GPT-3 (Generative Pre-trained Transformer, third generation), the [Master of Science in Business] students chose their titles in advance, then typed a sentence or two before allowing the the AI to complete the paragraph. Once GPT-3’s writing contributions were added, students reviewed the content and either continued on, or asked the AI to try again.”

Arizona State University: Essays explore altered social experiences from the COVID-19 pandemic

Arizona State University: Essays explore altered social experiences from the COVID-19 pandemic. “The collection explores the multitude of ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic has changed life in every aspect. As people around the world try to navigate challenges and revelations that have unfolded in light of the coronavirus pandemic, the faculty involved in the project say it is still crucial to consider the societal impact at large, and what it will mean down the line.”

Online Journalism Blog: Can long-form journalism bring readers back by learning from the literary essay? (Here are 17 concepts it can use)

Online Journalism Blog: Can long-form journalism bring readers back by learning from the literary essay? (Here are 17 concepts it can use). “Long-form journalism enjoyed a resurgence when editors tried to retain readers in the early 2000s — but the rise of mobile-first publishing has presented a challenge. In a special guest post for OJB, Michael Bugeja outlines how it can draw on narrative techniques from literary essays to keep readers reading — and coming back for more.”