New York University: Most Workers Experience Multiple, Interconnected Vulnerabilities to COVID-19

New York University: Most Workers Experience Multiple, Interconnected Vulnerabilities to COVID-19. “COVID-19 has had a devastating impact on people’s physical and mental health and has caused economic hardship. However, this adversity has disproportionately hurt certain populations—including essential workers and women—deepening existing disparities. One reason behind these disparities? The same people have been affected by clusters of interrelated factors, according to new research published in PLOS Global Public Health.”

Route Fifty: Librarians Now Frontline Workers in Combating Covid-19

Route Fifty: Librarians Now Frontline Workers in Combating Covid-19. “As public libraries across the nation begin handing out Covid-19 testing kits and N95 masks, librarians have become the latest frontline workers. Melanie Huggins, president of the Public Library Association, said libraries and librarians are essential to combating the virus seeing as they are vital to their communities and have accessible hours of operation.”

Los Angeles Times: Workplaces are filling up with employees who have COVID

Los Angeles Times: Workplaces are filling up with employees who have COVID. “Maria Bernal, an employee at a Jack in the Box in Folsom, Calif., couldn’t read the orders popping up on her screen. Her vision was blurry, her hands shook from chills and her head felt heavy. A pharmacist told her she probably had COVID-19. When she told her boss, the manager told Bernal to keep working. ‘Don’t worry, everyone has it, you can still work. Just wear a mask and don’t tell anyone,’ the manager said, according to a Jan. 14 complaint Bernal filed with Sacramento County’s public health department.”

The Workers Stories Project – The day-to-day lives of Scotland’s frontline workers during lockdown (Glasgow Live)

Glasgow Live: The Workers Stories Project – The day-to-day lives of Scotland’s frontline workers during lockdown. “Launched by trade unionists and activists in Glasgow last May, the Workers Stories Project is building an online archive which will show what the battle against coronavirus was like for the working class for generations to come. From delivery drivers and postal workers to teachers, carers and nurses, the project drew more than 80 accounts from those toiling on the frontline over the past 20 months. It also highlighted the unpaid labour done largely by women in the community.”

HuffPost: Congress Bailed Out Uber’s Workers. Now What?

HuffPost: Congress Bailed Out Uber’s Workers. Now What?. “With the coronavirus pandemic bearing down on the United States and Congress negotiating with the Donald Trump administration over a giant relief bill, Uber begged Trump not to leave out its drivers, who would normally not be eligible for unemployment benefits because they’re not regular employees. Congress soon created a whole new unemployment system that covered gig workers as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act in March 2020.”

New York Times: What the ‘Invisible’ People Cleaning the Subway Want Riders to Know

New York Times: What the ‘Invisible’ People Cleaning the Subway Want Riders to Know. “The thousands of workers the contractors hired — largely low-income immigrants from Latin America — were envisioned as a stopgap measure, as M.T.A. workers were falling ill and dying of the virus. At the same time, ridership and revenue had plummeted and the agency found itself in an intense budget crunch. But nearly a year later, the workers are still toiling at stations all over the city, some paid as little as half as much as the M.T.A. employees who did the same work before the pandemic began, and many without access to health insurance.”

New York Times: Why Child Care Staff Had to Show Up While Teachers Worked Remotely

New York Times: Why Child Care Staff Had to Show Up While Teachers Worked Remotely. “Over the last year, some educators, school officials and teachers’ union leaders in New York and across the country have declared that teachers are not babysitters, and that schools are not child care centers. The sentiment has been meant to convince the public that teachers should not be responsible for supervising children just so that parents can return to work. But while some educators have been able to work from home for much, if not all, of the pandemic, child care centers have emerged as substitute schools for many thousands of American children for whom online learning is not an option.”

CNET: Coronavirus pandemic gives health care workers a chance to shine on social media

CNET: Coronavirus pandemic gives health care workers a chance to shine on social media. “Health care influencers existed long before the pandemic, but the worldwide outbreak of COVID-19, the respiratory illness caused by the coronavirus, has provided a chance for health care workers to showcase their expertise as people spend more time on social media. These workers are turning to TikTok, Facebook, Instagram, Google-owned YouTube and other sites to educate the public, debunk misinformation, provide health care tips, boost vaccination rates and tackle hot-button topics such as health equity.”

Route Fifty: ‘Why Do I Put My Life on the Line?’ Pandemic Trauma Haunts Health Workers.

Route Fifty: ‘Why Do I Put My Life on the Line?’ Pandemic Trauma Haunts Health Workers.. “Health care workers across the country say they feel underappreciated by their employers and disillusioned with the medical profession, according to ongoing research at the University of Washington in Seattle. More than half of the 300-plus doctors, nurses and other frontline health workers who participated in the study said the pandemic has decreased the likelihood they will remain in their profession.”

New York Times: Fewer than half of states are giving vaccine access to U.S. Postal Service workers.

New York Times: Fewer than half of states are giving vaccine access to U.S. Postal Service workers.. “The Postal Service has endured tumultuous months amid a significant increase in online shopping, understaffing, government funding issues and an explosion of mail-in ballots during a contentious election. Thousands of postal workers have contracted the coronavirus, and more than 150 have died. Still, fewer than half of the states across the country — at least 22 — have begun administering shots to Postal Service workers, at least in some counties, even as they rapidly expand access to more groups of people, according to a New York Times survey.”

AP: Nurses fight conspiracy theories along with coronavirus

AP: Nurses fight conspiracy theories along with coronavirus. “Bogus claims about the virus, masks and vaccines have exploded since COVID-19 was declared a global pandemic a year ago. Journalists, public health officials and tech companies have tried to push back against the falsehoods, but much of the job of correcting misinformation has fallen to the world’s front-line medical workers.”

With many Alaska vaccine appointments unfilled, officials want you to know: You could be ‘essential’ (Alaska Public Media)

Alaska Public Media: With many Alaska vaccine appointments unfilled, officials want you to know: You could be ‘essential’. “A 21-year-old with an asthma inhaler, a 30-year-old oil roughneck and a 56-year-old freelance graphic designer walk into a brew pub in Alaska. What do they have in common? No, this isn’t a joke: All of them are newly eligible to be vaccinated — plus the bartender, too. After months of tight vaccine supply, the state of Alaska last week made a massive expansion of the groups eligible for shots. But it’s not clear the expanded criteria are fully registering with Alaskans yet, public health officials said at a briefing for reporters Monday.”

University of Alabama at Birmingham: Study shows high risk of anxiety, burnout in emergency department health care workers from COVID-19

University of Alabama at Birmingham: Study shows high risk of anxiety, burnout in emergency department health care workers from COVID-19. “Front line health care workers in hospital emergency departments are at increased risk for anxiety, burnout, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder while coping with the COVID-19 pandemic, according to research published in Annals of Emergency Medicine in February. The study, done in 20 emergency departments at hospitals in the United States, found that symptoms of anxiety and burnout were prevalent across the full spectrum of emergency department staff during the pandemic, and as many as one-fifth of health care employees were at risk for PTSD.”