Associated Press: Ga. Sen. Perdue boosts wealth with well-timed stock trades

Associated Press: Ga. Sen. Perdue boosts wealth with well-timed stock trades. “On Jan. 23, as word spread through Congress that the coronavirus posed a major economic and public health threat, Perdue sold off $1 million to $5 million in Cardlytics stock at $86 a share, according to congressional disclosures. Weeks later, in March, after the company’s stock plunged following an unexpected leadership shakeup and lower-than-forecast earnings, Perdue bought the stock back for $30 a share, investing between $200,000 and $500,000. Those shares have now quadrupled in value, closing at $121 a share on Tuesday.”

MIT Technology Review: Why social media can’t keep moderating content in the shadows

MIT Technology Review: Why social media can’t keep moderating content in the shadows. “In the post-election fog, social media has become the terrain for a low-grade war on our cognitive security, with misinformation campaigns and conspiracy theories proliferating. When the broadcast news business served the role of information gatekeeper, it was saddled with public interest obligations such as sharing timely, local, and relevant information. Social media companies have inherited a similar position in society, but they have not taken on those same responsibilities. This situation has loaded the cannons for claims of bias and censorship in how they moderated election-related content.”

VentureBeat: How to make sure your ‘AI for good’ project actually does good

VentureBeat: How to make sure your ‘AI for good’ project actually does good. “AI has the potential to help us address some of humanity’s biggest challenges like poverty and climate change. However, as any technological tool, it is agnostic to the context of application, the intended end-user, and the specificity of the data. And for that reason, it can ultimately end up having both beneficial and detrimental consequences. In this post, I’ll outline what can go right and what can go wrong in AI for good projects and will suggest some best practices for designing and deploying AI for good projects.”

The Conversation: We must make moral choices about how we relate to social media apps

The Conversation: We must make moral choices about how we relate to social media apps. “As an ethics professor, I’ve come to realise that we must make moral choices about how we relate to our technologies. This requires an honest evaluation of our needs and weaknesses, and a clear understanding of the intentions of these platforms.”

MIT Technology Review: AI ethics groups are repeating one of society’s classic mistakes

MIT Technology Review: AI ethics groups are repeating one of society’s classic mistakes. “International organizations and corporations are racing to develop global guidelines for the ethical use of artificial intelligence. Declarations, manifestos, and recommendations are flooding the internet. But these efforts will be futile if they fail to account for the cultural and regional contexts in which AI operates.”

Wired: Google Offers to Help Others With the Tricky Ethics of AI

Oh my word. Wired: Google Offers to Help Others With the Tricky Ethics of AI. “The company plans to launch new AI ethics services before the end of the year. Initially, Google will offer others advice on tasks such as spotting racial bias in computer vision systems, or developing ethical guidelines that govern AI projects. Longer term, the company may offer to audit customers’ AI systems for ethical integrity, and charge for ethics advice.”

Wired: An Ethics Guide for Tech Gets Rewritten With Workers in Mind

Wired: An Ethics Guide for Tech Gets Rewritten With Workers in Mind. “The Ethical Explorer Pack fits into a broader push for companies to think about social and cultural impacts the way they think about user engagement or profits. Some companies in Silicon Valley have even created internal corporate positions to focus on those issues, like Salesforce’s Office of Ethical and Humane Use. (Salesforce’s chief ethical and humane use officer, Paula Goldman, was poached from the Omidyar Network; she helped to create the original EthicalOS.) There are also other tool kits designed to help people go much deeper on specific problems, like the Open Data Institute’s Data Ethics Canvas.”

‘Morally Impossible’: Some Advertisers Take a Timeout From Facebook (New York Times)

New York Times: ‘Morally Impossible’: Some Advertisers Take a Timeout From Facebook. “Ever since Mark Zuckerberg defended the platform’s hands-off policy toward posts by President Trump that contained misinformation or promoted violence, some companies are staying away.”

JCK: New Website Rates Corporations’ Ethics During Coronavirus Pandemic

JCK: New Website Rates Corporations’ Ethics During Coronavirus Pandemic. “The site has a single purpose—assigning ratings to companies (Target, General Electric, etc.), celebs and influencers (Gal Gadot, Andrew Yang), and corporate titans (Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates) during the COVID-19 crisis by taking into account a wide range of do-goodery and bad behaviors.”

Governing: University Offers Free Class on Artificial Intelligence Ethics

Governing: University Offers Free Class on Artificial Intelligence Ethics. “The course — developed by [Nathan] Colaner, law professor Mark Chinen and adjunct business and law professor Tracy Ann Kosa — explores the meaning of ethics in AI by looking at guiding principles proposed by some nonprofits and technology companies. A case study on facial recognition in the course encourages students to evaluate different uses of facial-recognition technology, such as surveillance or identification, and to determine how the technology should be regulated.” The course is being offered by Seattle University.

MakeUseOf: 5 Sites to Find Ethical Alternatives to Tech, Fashion, and Unfair Brands

MakeUseOf: 5 Sites to Find Ethical Alternatives to Tech, Fashion, and Unfair Brands. “When we talk about making an ethical choice, there are different aspects to look at. For example, how a company behaves with its employees or a firm’s carbon footprint, or even how they treat animals. Importantly, you don’t need to be strict about ethical choices either. The first step is finding out what’s out there.”

Undark: 3D Printing and the Murky Ethics of Replicating Bones

Undark: 3D Printing and the Murky Ethics of Replicating Bones . “TEN YEARS AGO, it wasn’t possible for most people to use 3D technology to print authentic copies of human bones. Today, using a 3D printer and digital scans of actual bones, it is possible to create unlimited numbers of replica bones — each curve and break and tiny imperfection intact — relatively inexpensively. The technology is increasingly allowing researchers to build repositories of bone data, which they can use to improve medical procedures, map how humans have evolved, and even help show a courtroom how someone died. But the proliferation of faux bones also poses an ethical dilemma — and one that, prior to the advent of accessible 3D printing, was mostly limited to museum collections containing skeletons of dubious provenance.”

New York Times: ‘Techlash’ Hits College Campuses

New York Times: ‘Techlash’ Hits College Campuses. “Many students still see employment in tech as a ticket to prosperity, but for job seekers who can afford to be choosy, there is a growing sentiment that Silicon Valley’s most lucrative positions aren’t worth the ethical quandaries.”

Fashionista: Is It Even Possible To Be A Sustainable Influencer?

Fashionista: Is It Even Possible To Be A Sustainable Influencer?. “A small yet growing contingent of sustainable fashion influencers are questioning if ‘merching’ runs counter to their social and environmental ethos. Some, like [Ellie] Hughes, are shunning brands for their own closets or thrift-store finds. Others, like writer-stylist Aja Barber (@ajabarber), derive their revenue primarily through membership-based platforms like Patreon, where fans can donate to access exclusive content. One influencer, Hannah Neumann (formerly @lifestylejustice), even quit Instagram to establish a fair-trade factory in the Philippines. More may be wrestling with the cognitive dissonance of touting clothing or shoes people don’t necessarily need, even if they don’t talk about it.”