‘Morally Impossible’: Some Advertisers Take a Timeout From Facebook (New York Times)

New York Times: ‘Morally Impossible’: Some Advertisers Take a Timeout From Facebook. “Ever since Mark Zuckerberg defended the platform’s hands-off policy toward posts by President Trump that contained misinformation or promoted violence, some companies are staying away.”

JCK: New Website Rates Corporations’ Ethics During Coronavirus Pandemic

JCK: New Website Rates Corporations’ Ethics During Coronavirus Pandemic. “The site has a single purpose—assigning ratings to companies (Target, General Electric, etc.), celebs and influencers (Gal Gadot, Andrew Yang), and corporate titans (Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates) during the COVID-19 crisis by taking into account a wide range of do-goodery and bad behaviors.”

Governing: University Offers Free Class on Artificial Intelligence Ethics

Governing: University Offers Free Class on Artificial Intelligence Ethics. “The course — developed by [Nathan] Colaner, law professor Mark Chinen and adjunct business and law professor Tracy Ann Kosa — explores the meaning of ethics in AI by looking at guiding principles proposed by some nonprofits and technology companies. A case study on facial recognition in the course encourages students to evaluate different uses of facial-recognition technology, such as surveillance or identification, and to determine how the technology should be regulated.” The course is being offered by Seattle University.

MakeUseOf: 5 Sites to Find Ethical Alternatives to Tech, Fashion, and Unfair Brands

MakeUseOf: 5 Sites to Find Ethical Alternatives to Tech, Fashion, and Unfair Brands. “When we talk about making an ethical choice, there are different aspects to look at. For example, how a company behaves with its employees or a firm’s carbon footprint, or even how they treat animals. Importantly, you don’t need to be strict about ethical choices either. The first step is finding out what’s out there.”

Undark: 3D Printing and the Murky Ethics of Replicating Bones

Undark: 3D Printing and the Murky Ethics of Replicating Bones . “TEN YEARS AGO, it wasn’t possible for most people to use 3D technology to print authentic copies of human bones. Today, using a 3D printer and digital scans of actual bones, it is possible to create unlimited numbers of replica bones — each curve and break and tiny imperfection intact — relatively inexpensively. The technology is increasingly allowing researchers to build repositories of bone data, which they can use to improve medical procedures, map how humans have evolved, and even help show a courtroom how someone died. But the proliferation of faux bones also poses an ethical dilemma — and one that, prior to the advent of accessible 3D printing, was mostly limited to museum collections containing skeletons of dubious provenance.”

New York Times: ‘Techlash’ Hits College Campuses

New York Times: ‘Techlash’ Hits College Campuses. “Many students still see employment in tech as a ticket to prosperity, but for job seekers who can afford to be choosy, there is a growing sentiment that Silicon Valley’s most lucrative positions aren’t worth the ethical quandaries.”

Fashionista: Is It Even Possible To Be A Sustainable Influencer?

Fashionista: Is It Even Possible To Be A Sustainable Influencer?. “A small yet growing contingent of sustainable fashion influencers are questioning if ‘merching’ runs counter to their social and environmental ethos. Some, like [Ellie] Hughes, are shunning brands for their own closets or thrift-store finds. Others, like writer-stylist Aja Barber (@ajabarber), derive their revenue primarily through membership-based platforms like Patreon, where fans can donate to access exclusive content. One influencer, Hannah Neumann (formerly @lifestylejustice), even quit Instagram to establish a fair-trade factory in the Philippines. More may be wrestling with the cognitive dissonance of touting clothing or shoes people don’t necessarily need, even if they don’t talk about it.”

Harvard Business Review: The AI Transparency Paradox

Harvard Business Review: The AI Transparency Paradox. “In recent years, academics and practitioners alike have called for greater transparency into the inner workings of artificial intelligence models, and for many good reasons. Transparency can help mitigate issues of fairness, discrimination, and trust — all of which have received increased attention…. At the same time, however, it is becoming clear that disclosures about AI pose their own risks: Explanations can be hacked, releasing additional information may make AI more vulnerable to attacks, and disclosures can make companies more susceptible to lawsuits or regulatory action.”

MIT Technology Review: Making deepfake tools doesn’t have to be irresponsible. Here’s how.

MIT Technology Review: Making deepfake tools doesn’t have to be irresponsible. Here’s how.. “Synthetic media technologies—popularly known as deepfakes—have real potential for positive impact. Voice synthesis, for example, will allow us to speak in hundreds of languages in our own voice. Video synthesis may help us simulate self-driving-car accidents to avoid mistakes in the future. And text synthesis can accelerate our ability to write both programs and prose. But these advances can come at a gargantuan cost if we aren’t careful: the same underlying technologies can also enable deception with global ramifications.”

The Verge: Bioethics experts call on GoFundMe to ban unproven medical treatments

The Verge: Bioethics experts call on GoFundMe to ban unproven medical treatments. “In the new paper, published in the peer-reviewed bioethics journal The Hastings Center Report, the authors argue that GoFundMe enables misinformation that enriches bad actors and can harm patients sick with cancer or other serious conditions. Between November 2017 and November 2018, GoFundMe campaigns raised over $5 million for unregulated neurological stem cell procedures, according to a recent study. Those campaigns were shared over 200,000 times on social media.”

Stanford Medical: Stanford to lead development of coordinating hub for biomedical ethics

Stanford Medical: Stanford to lead development of coordinating hub for biomedical ethics. “The Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics has been chosen by the National Human Genome Research Institute to help lead the development of a coordinating hub for information on the ethical, legal and social implications of genetic research.”

An Ethics Resource at Your Fingertips: Meet BERC (University of St. Thomas)

University of St. Thomas: An Ethics Resource at Your Fingertips: Meet BERC. “Business Ethics Resource Center includes ethics and compliance resources from nationally and internationally recognized ethics and compliance centers, consortia and organizations, experts and thought leaders, qualified academics and practitioners, and industry groups.”

NIH: On the Ethics of Using Social Media Data for Health Research

NIH: On the Ethics of Using Social Media Data for Health Research. “Social media has grown in popularity for health-related research as it has become evident that it can be a good source of patient insights. Be it Twitter, Reddit, Instagram, Facebook, Amazon reviews or health forums, researchers have collected and processed user comments and published countless papers on different uses of social media data. Using these data can be a perfectly acceptable research practice, provided they are used ethically and the research approach is solid.”

The Next Web: Here’s how to find ethical alternatives to big tech products and services

The Next Web: Here’s how to find ethical alternatives to big tech products and services. “It’s not like any of us went to a store for unethical people and told the clerk to load us up with dozens of products and services developed by companies that have no regard for personal privacy, human rights, or the future of our planet. But here we sit.”