Associated Press: Facebook fails again to detect hate speech in ads

Associated Press: Facebook fails again to detect hate speech in ads. “[Global Witness] created 12 text-based ads that used dehumanizing hate speech to call for the murder of people belonging to each of Ethiopia’s three main ethnic groups — the Amhara, the Oromo and the Tigrayans. Facebook’s systems approved the ads for publication, just as they did with the Myanmar ads. The ads were not actually published on Facebook.”

Bureau of Investigative Journalism: Facebook accused by survivors of letting activists incite ethnic massacres with hate and misinformation in Ethiopia

The Bureau of Investigative Journalism: Facebook accused by survivors of letting activists incite ethnic massacres with hate and misinformation in Ethiopia. “The company has known for years that it was helping to directly fuel the growing tensions in the country. Many of those fighting misinformation and hate on the ground – fact checkers, journalists, civil society organisations and human rights activists – say Facebook’s support is still far less than it could and should be. A senior member of Ethiopia’s media accused Facebook of ‘just standing by and watching this country fall apart’.”

The Verge: Oversight Board raises alarm over Facebook’s role in Ethiopian conflict

The Verge: Oversight Board raises alarm over Facebook’s role in Ethiopian conflict. “Facebook has come under fire for its role in the Ethiopian conflict, with observers drawing parallels with the company’s role in the genocide of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar. There, an online campaign led by Myanmar military personnel stoked hatred against the Rohingya minority groups and led to acts of mass murder and ethnic cleansing. In Ethiopia, similar rumors and incitements to violence have been allowed to proliferate, despite numerous Facebook employees reportedly raising the alarm within the company.”

Ethiopia’s Tigray conflict: What are Facebook and Twitter doing about hate speech? (BBC)

BBC: Ethiopia’s Tigray conflict: What are Facebook and Twitter doing about hate speech?. “Social media giants Facebook and Twitter have come under fire over their roles in the ongoing conflict in Ethiopia. Critics say they are not doing enough to prevent the spread of hate speech and incitement to violence on their platforms, but that has been rejected by the companies. We’ve looked at some examples and what is being done to deal with them.”

BBC: Facebook deletes Ethiopia PM’s post that urged citizens to ‘bury’ rebels

BBC: Facebook deletes Ethiopia PM’s post that urged citizens to ‘bury’ rebels. “Facebook has removed a post from Ethiopia’s prime minister for violating its policies against inciting violence. On Sunday, Abiy Ahmed called on citizens take up arms to block the advance of the rebel Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF). The TPLF has fought a year-long campaign against government forces, capturing key towns in recent days.”

Voice of America: US-Based Non-Profit Group Reunites Ethiopian Families Separated by Adoption

Voice of America: US-Based Non-Profit Group Reunites Ethiopian Families Separated by Adoption. “Helped by an adoptive mom with strong tech skills, [Andrea] Kelley invested countless hours and $3,000 to launch BF-EAC [Beteseb Felega-Ethiopian Adoption Connection] in 2014. Since then, the organization – registered with the Ethiopian government as a nonprofit – has reconnected more than 200 adoptees with their Ethiopian relatives. More than 1,000 other cases remain active in the registry, with adoptees or their birth relatives seeking connections.”

Washington Post: Ethiopia’s cracking down in Tigray. But activists are spreading the news.

Washington Post: Ethiopia’s cracking down in Tigray. But activists are spreading the news.. “In the early hours of Nov. 4, Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed shut down telecommunications and deployed troops to his country’s northern Tigray region. Shortly after, a flurry of new Twitter accounts appeared and began to tweet about the situation. By the following week, new accounts were responsible for nearly a quarter of tweets about the crisis.”

National Accord Newspaper: Ethiopia experiences Internet blackout after musician Haacaaluu shot dead

National Accord Newspaper: Ethiopia experiences Internet blackout after musician Haacaaluu shot dead. “A blanket shutdown of the Internet in Ethiopia is being reported by Access Now, an organisation defending the digital rights of users at risk around the world. This came hours after prominent and outspoken Oromo musician Haacaaluu Hundeessaa was shot dead in Addis Abeba, the country’s capital. There have also been reports – via social media – of people taking to the streets demanding justice.”

COVID-19: A camel library takes remote learning to new levels (ReliefWeb)

ReliefWeb: COVID-19: A camel library takes remote learning to new levels. “A camel library is giving children out of school in some of Ethiopia’s most remote villages a unique opportunity to continue reading and learning, despite COVID-19 school closures. Save the Children first began the camel library in 2010. The programme includes 21 camels, which are traditionally used by communities in the Somali region of Ethiopia to transport goods across the hot lowland areas. Camels can carry up to 200 storybooks at a time in wooden boxes strapped to their backs. The project currently reaches over 22,000 children in 33 villages.”

Africa Newsroom: In Ethiopia, mobile internet cut in the capital amid clashes and protests

Africa Newsroom: In Ethiopia, mobile internet cut in the capital amid clashes and protests. “The Committee to Protect Journalists today urged Ethiopian authorities to ensure internet is available, including during times of unrest when access to information provided by journalists is crucial. Mobile internet was unavailable in the capital Addis Abba, from September 17 to the morning of September 19 amid protests and clashes, according to media reports and Berhan Taye, who leads Access Now’s #KeepItOn campaign against internet shutdowns, which CPJ is part of.”