The Verge: Facebook, Twitter, and Google must remove scams or risk legal action, says EU

The Verge: Facebook, Twitter, and Google must remove scams or risk legal action, says EU. “Navigating your way around the internet may seem intuitive if you’ve grown up with access to it most of your life — but for those who are just beginning to use social media platforms, it can be hard to detect scam from the constant stream of information. The European Commission has taken a step to prevent these types of web-based consumer fraud, ordering companies like Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ to address and prevent them from appearing on their sites.”

The Verge: EU launches new tool for whistleblowers to report antitrust violations and cartels

The Verge: EU launches new tool for whistleblowers to report antitrust violations and cartels. “The European Commission (the executive arm of the EU) has launched a new initiative to encourage whistleblowers to step forward. A whistleblowing hotline including an email address, phone number, and encrypted web form will allow individuals to anonymously report price-fixing cartels and other anti-competitive practices.”

TechCrunch: Legal challenge to Facebook EU-US data transfer mechanism kicks off in Ireland

TechCrunch: Legal challenge to Facebook EU-US data transfer mechanism kicks off in Ireland. “Another legal challenge to a data transfer authorization mechanism relied upon by Facebook and thousands of other companies to legally move user data from the European Union to the U.S. for processing has kicked off in the Irish High Court today. The hearing is expected to last three weeks, and is taking place in Ireland because Facebook’s European headquarters are located in the country.”

Guardian: WhatsApp, Facebook and Google face tough new privacy rules under EC proposal

The Guardian: WhatsApp, Facebook and Google face tough new privacy rules under EC proposal. “The new legislation seeks to reinforce the right to privacy and control of data for European citizens, with messaging, email and voice services – such as those provided by Facebook, Google and Microsoft – forced to guarantee the confidentiality of conversations and metadata around the time, place and other factors of those conversations.”

Quartz: The EU is charging Facebook for misleading it over the WhatsApp deal

Quartz: The EU is charging Facebook for misleading it over the WhatsApp deal. “The European Union’s competition regulator says it was misled by Facebook over the tech company’s ability to match its users to accounts on WhatsApp, the messaging company that was acquired for $19 billion in 2014. The allegations are limited in scope and will not change the commission’s decision to clear the acquisition. However,Facebook could face a fine of 1% of its total revenue.”

Open Democracy UK: We need European regulation of Facebook and Google

Open Democracy UK: We need European regulation of Facebook and Google. “Facebook and Google are now the dominant media powers in the world. Up till now, they have resisted being treated as media companies despite the sheer and unparalleled power they exert. They argue that they are widening the base of user-generated content and its distribution, bringing communities together, providing platforms for media companies to reach new audiences, and are thus promoting competition. Well, they are now of such a size that it is impossible to argue that their dominance does not raise worrying issues about media pluralism. There is a wide and growing range of other media organisations, civil society activists and academics who believe that media pluralism is under threat, that there are new issues of power, concentration and dominance not adequately captured in existing competition rules or tests, and that action is needed. The immediate forum for that action, ironically given 2016’s events, is probably the European Union and its Digital Single Market agenda.”

The Entire EU Is Getting a Bug Bounty Program

Wow: the entire EU is getting a bug bounty program. “Today the European Parliament approved the EU Budget for 2017. The budget sets aside 1.9 million euros in order to improve the EU’s IT infrastructure by extending the free software audit programme (FOSSA) that MEPs Max Anderson and Julia Reda initiated two years ago, and by including a bug bounty approach in the programme that was proposed by MEP Marietje Schaake.”