Washington Post: Millions brace for more layoffs, hunger and utility shutoffs as stimulus talks break down

Washington Post: Millions brace for more layoffs, hunger and utility shutoffs as stimulus talks break down. “Americans left in the lurch by President Trump’s sudden decision to abandon negotiations over a long-delayed stimulus package expressed disbelief, disgust and desperation Wednesday about Trump’s abrupt move. In interviews with The Washington Post, more than a dozen unemployed workers and struggling business owners affected by the move said that while they are familiar with Washington dysfunction, they are stunned by the latest decision by Trump and Republicans to break discussions off.”

TIME: ‘Cancel Rent’ Has Become a Rallying Cry for Cash-Strapped Americans. Here’s Why It Hasn’t Yet Worked in The U.S. City That Championed It

TIME: ‘Cancel Rent’ Has Become a Rallying Cry for Cash-Strapped Americans. Here’s Why It Hasn’t Yet Worked in The U.S. City That Championed It. ” Though throngs of renters from Philadelphia to the Bay Area have abstained from paying rent on an individual basis, culminating in what is probably the largest rent strike in U.S. history, cities and states have so far refused to make the practice legal. Ithaca’s attempt to do so—and its failure to actually implement it so far—illustrates the limited capability municipalities have in responding to economic crises: While the federal government can take on substantial debts to facilitate significant emergency relief efforts, cities and most states are required to maintain balanced budgets.”

Financial Advisor: Eviction Filings By Big Landlords Surged After Trump Issued Ban

Financial Advisor: Eviction Filings By Big Landlords Surged After Trump Issued Ban. “Big landlords increased the number of eviction cases they filed after President Donald Trump announced his recent moratorium, signaling the struggle tenants face getting protection from the federal order. Institutional landlords filed more than 900 eviction cases across eight metropolitan areas from Sept. 2 to Sept. 8, according to data compiled by Private Equity Stakeholder Project, an activist group partly funded by organized labor. Landlords filed 165 cases in the same markets during the week of Aug. 3.”

Reuters: ‘Groundbreaking’ U.S. housing data hailed as new tool to target COVID-19 aid

Reuters: ‘Groundbreaking’ U.S. housing data hailed as new tool to target COVID-19 aid. “About five million Americans lose their homes every year due to eviction or foreclosure, researchers said on Wednesday, urging policymakers to use their new county-specific data on housing loss to target coronavirus aid more effectively. The research by New America, a think-tank, stitches together county-level eviction and mortgage foreclosure data for the first time to create a National Housing Loss Index, comparing 2,200 U.S. counties for which data was available.”

New York Times: As Evictions Loom, Lawyers Are Gearing Up to Help

New York Times: As Evictions Loom, Lawyers Are Gearing Up to Help. “For tenants, especially those with limited means, having a lawyer can be the difference between being evicted or being able to stay on in a rented home. Yet legal representation for tenants is relatively rare in housing courts. Surveys from several big cities over the years have shown that in housing court, landlords are represented by lawyers at least 80 percent time, while tenants tend to have lawyers in fewer than 10 percent of cases.”

Debt, eviction and hunger: Millions fall back into crisis as stimulus and safety nets vanish (Washington Post)

Washington Post: Debt, eviction and hunger: Millions fall back into crisis as stimulus and safety nets vanish. “Major recessions are especially fraught for low-income earners, whose finances can veer from tenuous to dire with one missed paycheck. But as the economy cratered this spring, economists and poverty experts were mildly surprised to discover that the torrent of government support that followed — particularly the $600 a week in expanded unemployment benefits and one-time $1,200 stimulus checks — likely lowered the overall poverty rate. In fact, 17 million people would have dropped below the poverty line without the $500 billion in direct intervention for American families, said Zach Parolin, a researcher at Columbia University. Now, data show, those gains are eroding as federal inaction deprives Americans on the financial margins of additional support.”

New York Times: They’re Making the Rent. Is It Costing Their Future?

New York Times: They’re Making the Rent. Is It Costing Their Future?. “They’ve made it with government checks and family help. They’ve made it with savings and odd jobs. They’ve made it with church charity, nonprofit rescue funds, GoFundMe campaigns. One way or another, through five months of economic dislocation, the nation’s tenants have for the most part made their rent. Now the question is how much longer these patchwork maneuvers will work — and what will happen to the economy if they suddenly don’t.”

Washington Post: Trump says he’s ‘stopping evictions.’ Here’s why they’re still happening.

Washington Post: Trump says he’s ‘stopping evictions.’ Here’s why they’re still happening.. “Since signing an executive order a week ago, President Trump has repeatedly said that his administration was ‘stopping evictions’ and ‘protecting people from evictions.’ The order would ‘largely — hopefully, completely’ solve a looming crisis among renters at risk of losing their homes, Trump said. But across the country, evictions are continuing.”

6sqft: NYC launches online portal with free eviction help

6sqft: NYC launches online portal with free eviction help. “An online portal launched on Monday to help New York City renters avoid eviction by providing free resources and legal assistance. The new website comes just days after Gov. Andrew Cuomo extended the state’s eviction moratorium for at least another month, only hours before it was set to expire. But with housing trials expected to resume in September in most of the city, tenant advocates say that no law currently in place protects the 14,000 households issued eviction warrants prior to the pandemic.”

Washington Post: 2020 is the summer of booming home sales — and evictions

Washington Post: 2020 is the summer of booming home sales — and evictions. “For Realtor James Dietsche, there is only one way to describe the real estate market right now: ‘It’s insane.’ A 1950s style three-bedroom home he listed in late June for $200,000 in a small town outside Harrisburg, Pa., received 26 offers the initial weekend it was for sale. Many buyers were young couples seeking a starter home and retirees looking to downsize. But bids also came from Philadelphia, New York City and the Washington, D.C., area. One person was willing to pay up to $50,000 above asking. Several were offering to buy it without inspections. While Dietsche’s cellphone has been ringing with eager buyers, Tammy Steen’s phone has been buzzing for a different reason. Her landlord keeps calling demanding the $700 rent she does not have.”

Vice: The Eviction Crisis Is Already Here and It’s Crushing Black Moms

Vice: The Eviction Crisis Is Already Here and It’s Crushing Black Moms. “Amid widespread job loss, reduced hours, and pay cuts, more than 12.5 million renters, like [Lacresha] Lewis, were unable to make their most recent payment, according to survey data collected last week and released by the U.S. Census Bureau Wednesday. And nearly 24 million people have little to no confidence in their ability to pay next month’s rent, Census data show. Approximately 56% of those anxious renters are Black or Latinx — the populations that are also more likely to rent, and more likely to spend a bigger portion of their income on housing. That’s while Black and Latinx people have been disproportionately harmed by the virus itself, and the resulting job loss. ”

Fast Company: 11 million households could be evicted over the next four months

Fast Company: 11 million households could be evicted over the next four months. “Global advisory firm Stout, with input from the National Coalition for a Civil Right to Counsel (NCCRC), used census survey results and income data to develop a new eviction estimation tool that estimates how many households could be at risk of eviction as moratoriums end, courts reopen, and rent relief efforts fall short. More than 16 million renter households are at risk of eviction, according to the tool, and more than 11 million households could be served with eviction papers over the next four months.”

ProPublica: The Eviction Ban Worked, but It’s Almost Over. Some Landlords Are Getting Ready.

ProPublica: The Eviction Ban Worked, but It’s Almost Over. Some Landlords Are Getting Ready.. “Starting July 25, a key component of the federal eviction moratorium is set to expire, allowing landlords that operate federally backed rental properties to give their tenants 30 days’ notice to vacate. After that period, landlords can file for eviction. Axiom has made it clear that it intends to take swift legal action once the protections run out.”

BuzzFeed News: The $600 Unemployment Benefits Are Expiring This Weekend Because Senate Republicans Didn’t Do Anything

BuzzFeed News: The $600 Unemployment Benefits Are Expiring This Weekend Because Senate Republicans Didn’t Do Anything. “After this weekend, the unemployment subsidy expires. Congress plans to pass another coronavirus aid bill but is moving at a snail’s pace. Republicans spent the entire week debating among themselves on a proposal. Bipartisan talks have not yet even begun. The Senate left Washington on Thursday and won’t return until Monday, after the benefits expire. At the least, a temporary lapse in unemployment aid is all but certain. This is happening right as millions of people are being exposed to the threat of eviction.”

‘It’s a mess’: Congress prepares to lurch over unemployment aid cliff (Politico)

Politico: ‘It’s a mess’: Congress prepares to lurch over unemployment aid cliff. “A dysfunctional Congress is about to go careening off yet another fiscal cliff — but this will hurt a hell of a lot more than most. Tens of millions of unemployed Americans are about to lose their economic lifeline during the worst recession in 80 years, with eviction protections set to expire at the same time.”