Ars Technica: Excel esports on ESPN show world the pain of format errors

Ars Technica: Excel esports on ESPN show world the pain of format errors. “The Financial Modeling World Cup (FMWC) hosts regular international competitions, both invitational and open to anyone, in which Excel pros strive to solve as many questions as possible from a complex task. You can download all three of the tasks used in last weekend’s battle for free. ESPN showed a 30-minute edited version of the full two-hour-and-48-minute all-star battle between previous champions.”

ZDNet: Microsoft makes sharing Excel workbooks in Teams happen in real-time with ‘Excel Live’

ZDNet: Microsoft makes sharing Excel workbooks in Teams happen in real-time with ‘Excel Live’. “Microsoft is continuing to make real-time collaboration actually work inside Teams. Its latest effort in this space is called Excel Live. This feature will be available in public preview at the end of August. Microsoft officials announced Excel Live on Day 1 of the company’s annual Inspire partner conference on July 19.”

PC World: Top Excel experts will battle it out in an esports-like competition this weekend

PC World: Top Excel experts will battle it out in an esports-like competition this weekend. “No, this isn’t a joke. The Financial Modeling World Cup will be held this weekend entirely in Microsoft Excel. And the finals (the quarterfinals, semifinals, and the final match) will all be broadcast live as they happen at 9 AM PT. Everyone’s playing for a total prize of $10,000 — funded by Microsoft, of course.”

The Conversation: Excel autocorrect errors still plague genetic research, raising concerns over scientific rigour

The Conversation: Excel autocorrect errors still plague genetic research, raising concerns over scientific rigour. “Autocorrection, or predictive text, is a common feature of many modern tech tools, from internet searches to messaging apps and word processors. Autocorrection can be a blessing, but when the algorithm makes mistakes it can change the message in dramatic and sometimes hilarious ways. Our research shows autocorrect errors, particularly in Excel spreadsheets, can also make a mess of gene names in genetic research.”

MakeUseOf: How to Make a 3D Map in Excel

MakeUseOf: How to Make a 3D Map in Excel. “When visualizing and exploring geographic data, you can use Microsoft 3D Maps in Excel to project and analyze the data in a more meaningful way. Excel includes the Microsoft 3D Maps, a brand new tool to plot 3D charts using geographical data. This tool is available to Excel users from the 2016 version of Microsoft Office. Microsoft 3D Maps tool enables you to explore geodata in a new and effective approach.” You might see the first three numbered paragraphs and think, “Ugh, shallow overview article with no how-to.” Keep going; Tamal Das gets to the good Excel stuff pretty quick.

The nightmare is real: ‘Excel formulas are the world’s most widely used programming language,’ says Microsoft (The Register)

The Register: The nightmare is real: ‘Excel formulas are the world’s most widely used programming language,’ says Microsoft. “Microsoft will let users create custom functions in Excel using the number wrangler’s own formula language….Dubbed LAMBDA, the feature (currently rolling out to beta customers) will be a lifesaver for anyone charged with maintaining herds of increasingly complicated spreadsheets, who have doubtlessly been wondering how it could be that Excel was missing such a seemingly obvious ability for so many decades.”

The Verge: Scientists rename human genes to stop Microsoft Excel from misreading them as dates

The Verge: Scientists rename human genes to stop Microsoft Excel from misreading them as dates. “There are tens of thousands of genes in the human genome: minuscule twists of DNA and RNA that combine to express all of the traits and characteristics that make each of us unique. Each gene is given a name and alphanumeric code, known as a symbol, which scientists use to coordinate research. But over the past year or so, some 27 human genes have been renamed, all because Microsoft Excel kept misreading their symbols as dates.”

Analytics Vidhya: 10+ Simple Yet Powerful Excel Tricks for Data Analysis

Analytics Vidhya: 10+ Simple Yet Powerful Excel Tricks for Data Analysis. “I’ve always admired the immense power of Excel. This software is not only capable of doing basic data computations, but you can also perform data analysis using it. It is widely used for many purposes including the likes of financial modeling and business planning. It can become a good stepping stone for people who are new to the world of business analytics.”

The Verge: You can now make sick beats in Microsoft Excel

The Verge: You can now make sick beats in Microsoft Excel. “Late last year, electronic musician and YouTuber Dylan Tallchief made a functional drum machine in Microsoft Excel after a bunch of Excel DAW memes made their way around social media. Now, Tallchief is back with an even more ambitious project that fully realizes the original meme’s potential: an Excel DAW he calls xlStudio. (For those outside the audio world, DAW stands for ‘digital audio workstation’ and is a software suite like Ableton or FL Studio used for making music.)”