Boing Boing: Survey finds 22% of scientists who do media interviews about COVID get violent threats

Boing Boing: Survey finds 22% of scientists who do media interviews about COVID get violent threats. “Nature surveyed 300 scientists who’ve done media interviews about COVID. The results had some surprisingly positive notes — 85% said ‘their experiences of engaging with the media were always or mostly positive, even if they were harassed afterwards’. But as you might expect, a significant chunk described some ghastly abuse. Fully 15% got death threats, and 22% “received threats of physical or sexual violence.”

UMass Chan: A direct recommendation from a doctor may help with vaccine hesitancy

UMass Chan: A direct recommendation from a doctor may help with vaccine hesitancy. “Though the science is clear that COVID-19 vaccines save lives, it can be difficult to start a productive conversation about vaccination. And doctors experience the same challenge, too. We are researchers at the UMass Chan Medical School who have been trying to address this challenge. One of us is a critical care pulmonologist who was on the front lines working in the COVID-19 intensive care unit during the darkest days of the pandemic. And one of us has studied patient perspectives on health and health care for many years. To figure out how doctors can best talk to their patients about vaccination, we first needed to understand what patients were concerned about.”

Las Cruces Sun News: NMSU researcher explores the ‘dark side’ of social media influence on political participation

Las Cruces Sun News: NMSU researcher explores the ‘dark side’ of social media influence on political participation. “The study points to increased political participation by uninformed voters, considered the ‘dark side’ of political participation. It finds uninformed voters can actively engage in politics thinking that they know enough about politics and current affairs.”

Route Fifty: A Free Tool to Help Cities Take Full Advantage of Federal Aid

Route Fifty: A Free Tool to Help Cities Take Full Advantage of Federal Aid. “The Covid Federal Assistance e311 site, a partnership between Bloomberg Philanthropies and the U.S. Conference of Mayors, gives cities free access to a searchable database of questions and answers about the rules and regulations governing the use of federal coronavirus relief dollars. The resources are also available to county leaders, as the rules dictating use of the funds are similar for both types of governments.” The writeup makes it sound like the information is restricted, but it’s not. I was able to search the database and view questions and answers without any problem.

LinkedIn Blog: Learn from Experts in Real Time With Office Hours

LinkedIn Blog: Learn from Experts in Real Time With Office Hours. “We’re excited to introduce a new Office Hours feature that lets instructors host live events on LinkedIn Learning. With Office Hours, learners are able to stay on top of industry trends and interact with experts and fellow learners in real-time by posting questions, comments and reactions.” LinkedIn is also some of its courses free through October 15.

At my hospital, over 95% of COVID-19 patients share one thing in common: They’re unvaccinated (The Conversation)

The Conversation: At my hospital, over 95% of COVID-19 patients share one thing in common: They’re unvaccinated. “As an emergency medicine and critical care doctor at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, I’ve lost count of the number of COVID-19 surges since the U.S. pandemic began in Seattle in February 2020. But this one feels different. The patients are younger. They have fewer preexisting medical conditions. And at my hospital, over 95% of these hospitalized patients share one common feature: They’re unvaccinated.”

UCSF: AI Algorithm Matches Cardiologists’ Expertise, While Explaining Its Decisions

UCSF: AI Algorithm Matches Cardiologists’ Expertise, While Explaining Its Decisions. “Clinicians rely daily on electrocardiograms (ECG) to detect common cardiovascular conditions, but accurate diagnoses require high levels of expertise. In a new study that reviewed nearly 1 million ECGs from 365,000 adults, an artificial intelligence algorithm exceeded the performance of a widely available commercial system in nearly all examined diagnoses, while also matching the performance of expert cardiologists and, importantly, providing an explanation for its results.”

NJ .com: NJ. com launches New Jersey Diverse Sources Database with media partners

NJ .com: NJ. com launches New Jersey Diverse Sources Database with media partners. “NJ Advance Media, which produces content for NJ.com, The Star-Ledger and other affiliated newspapers, is proud to join the Center for Cooperative Media in launching the New Jersey Diverse Sources Database. The online resource for news organizations will help journalists expand their circle of sources to include a greater variety of backgrounds.”

The Conversation: We trained AI to recognise footprints, but it won’t replace forensic experts yet

The Conversation: We trained AI to recognise footprints, but it won’t replace forensic experts yet. “In forensic science, the expert witness plays a vital role. Lawyers seek them out for their analysis and opinion on specialist evidence. But experts are human, with all their failings, and the role of expert witnesses has frequently been linked to miscarriages of justice. We’ve been investigating the potential for AI to study evidence in forensic science. In two recent papers, we found AI was better at assessing footprints than general forensic scientists, but not better than specific footprint experts.”

STAT: What’s safe to do during summer’s Covid surge? STAT asked public health experts about their own plans

STAT: What’s safe to do during summer’s Covid surge? STAT asked public health experts about their own plans. “Confusion abounds about what is safe to do. (For the unvaccinated, there’s no confusion about what’s most important to do: Get immunized.) To try to cut through the fog, STAT contacted three dozen epidemiologists, immunologists, and other infectious disease experts around the country to see how they are navigating the risk of Covid in these uncertain times. Twenty-eight responded.”

Tech Xplore: AI researchers trust international, scientific organizations most, study finds

Tech Xplore: AI researchers trust international, scientific organizations most, study finds. “Researchers working in the areas of machine learning and artificial intelligence trust international and scientific organizations the most to shape the development and use of AI in the public interest. But who do they trust the least? National militaries, Chinese tech companies and Facebook.”