CNET: Snap’s newest AR filter makes floors full of lava (or water)

CNET: Snap’s newest AR filter makes floors full of lava (or water). “I took a look at two of Snap’s new Lenses, one that makes floors full of lava and one that makes everything look flooded. The effect stretches out pretty far, but not infinitely, and moving around causes the effect to redraw in new areas. The water effect was particularly effective: It looks like a weird office mirage.”

SlashGear: Chrome 81 is shaping up to be an AR-packed release

SlashGear: Chrome 81 is shaping up to be an AR-packed release. “With Chrome 81, Google is extending its support to augmented reality, specifically with the WebXR Hit Test API. In a nutshell, this means that developers can use a device’s camera view to correctly place virtual objects on surfaces both horizontal and vertical. Google promises that those who already played around with WebXR API won’t need to relearn things as it applies to both VR and AR experiences.”

Nextgov: Marine Corps Looks to Virtual Reality as a Recruitment Tool

Nextgov: Marine Corps Looks to Virtual Reality as a Recruitment Tool. “Future recruits of the Marine Corps Flight Officer Program—including people who’ve never considered such a career path before—could soon gain a cutting-edge, front-seat view of what the aviation jobs would entail, through virtual reality.”

The Verge: I climbed onto my roof for this Pearl Jam app

The Verge: I climbed onto my roof for this Pearl Jam app. “There is only one man who could get me to soberly climb onto my building’s rooftop for a gimmicky artificial reality app in the middle of February, and his name is Eddie Vedder, the frontman of ‘90s Seattle grunge group Pearl Jam. On Thursday, Pearl Jam rolled out a snippet of a new song entitled ‘Superblood Wolfmoon’ that you can only listen to by pointing your phone at the Moon.”

Photonics: VR Classroom Immerses Students in Nanotechnology

Photonics: VR Classroom Immerses Students in Nanotechnology. “In a custom-developed virtual reality (VR) classroom at the University of Arizona, students can pick up and examine scaled-up versions of nanosize objects. The classroom is part of Nano 2020, a University of Arizona-led initiative to develop curriculum and technology focused on educating students in the rapidly expanding role of nanotechnology within the fields of agriculture and the life sciences.”

The Verge: Sundance VR and AR got extremely weird in 2020

The Verge: Sundance VR and AR got extremely weird in 2020. “Sundance and other virtual or augmented reality-heavy art events might eventually have to grapple with this issue. Projects are getting longer (10 to 30 minutes, versus five to 10 minutes a few years ago), and many can only handle one or two people at a time. For context, the film festival had over 120,000 attendees. Even if only a fraction visit New Frontier, that means a lot of planning or long waits. It’s part of a bigger VR and AR scaling problem — headsets are niche, relatively rare devices that enthusiasts are still figuring out how to build a medium around.”

TechCrunch: NASA finds real uses for VR and AR in astronomy and engineering

TechCrunch: NASA finds real uses for VR and AR in astronomy and engineering. “Studying the astronomical number of stars in our galaxy is generally done using legacy tools, scattered databases, perhaps even paper and pencil. And as such it can be hard to use that great multi-purpose pattern recognition engine, the human brain, to full effect on the information. Tom Grubb, an engineer at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, has felt for years that VR and AR are valuable tools for exploring and working with this type of data, and his team has just presented its first paper directly resulting from using those technologies.”