The Atlantic: Social Media Are a Mass Shooter’s Best Friend

The Atlantic: Social Media Are a Mass Shooter’s Best Friend. “A terrorist attack in New Zealand cast new blame on how technology platforms police content. But global internet services were designed to work this way, and there might be no escape from their grip.”

TechCrunch: UK Far Right activist circumvents Facebook ban to livestream threats

TechCrunch: UK Far Right activist circumvents Facebook ban to livestream threats . “Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, a Far Right UK activist who was permanently banned from Facebook last week for repeatedly breaching its community standards on hate speech, was nonetheless able to use its platform to livestream harassment of an anti-fascist blogger whom he doorstepped at home last night.”

Los Angeles Times: Facebook decided which users are interested in Nazis — and let advertisers target them directly

Los Angeles Times: Facebook decided which users are interested in Nazis — and let advertisers target them directly. “Facebook makes money by charging advertisers to reach just the right audience for their message — even when that audience is made up of people interested in the perpetrators of the Holocaust or explicitly neo-Nazi music. Despite promises of greater oversight following past advertising scandals, a Times review shows that Facebook has continued to allow advertisers to target hundreds of thousands of users the social media firm believes are curious about topics such as ‘Joseph Goebbels,’ ‘Josef Mengele,’ ‘Heinrich Himmler,’ the neo-nazi punk band Skrewdriver and Benito Mussolini’s long-defunct National Fascist Party.”

Understanding Violent Extremism: Messaging and Recruitment Strategies on Social Media in the Philippines (ReliefWeb)

ReliefWeb: Understanding Violent Extremism: Messaging and Recruitment Strategies on Social Media in the Philippines. “The first news that militants had taken to the streets of the Islamic City of Marawi on May 23, 2017, came from Facebook. Pictures of masked men carrying assault rifles and waving the black flag of the Islamic State were swirling across social media well before Philippine and international news channels picked up the story. By the time the military and the media had begun to respond, Marawi’s residents were already streaming out of the city by the tens of thousands to seek refuge from the violence. The fact that news of the siege spread first on Facebook isn’t surprising. Over 60 million Filipinos have access to the internet; of those, 97 percent are on Facebook. For many, Facebook is the internet, a circumstance encouraged by local telecoms that offer free access to the social media site without the need for a paid data plan.”

Michigan State University: Putting Understudied Terrorists Under A Microscope

Michigan State University: Putting Understudied Terrorists Under A Microscope. “Bombs exploding, hostages taken and masked gunmen firing machine guns are all types of terrorist attacks we’ve seen. According to new Michigan State University research, it’s the attacks we don’t see – cyberattacks – that happen more often and can cause greater destruction.”

The Quint: Social Media Becoming Source of Radicalisation, Says Army Chief

The Quint: Social Media Becoming Source of Radicalisation, Says Army Chief. “Asserting that terrorism is becoming ‘a new form of warfare’, Army chief General Bipin Rawat said on Wednesday, 9 January, that the menace is spreading like a ‘multi-headed monster’ and is ‘here to stay’ as long as states continue to use it as state policy. Rawat, speaking at a panel discussion at the Raisina Dialogue in New Delhi, also said that there was a need to control social media as it was becoming a tool to spread radicalisation.”

The Daily Beast: How YouTube Built a Radicalization Machine for the Far-Right

The Daily Beast: How YouTube Built a Radicalization Machine for the Far-Right. “For David Sherratt, like so many teenagers, far-right radicalization began with video game tutorials on YouTube. He was 15 years old and loosely liberal, mostly interested in ‘Call of Duty’ clips. Then YouTube’s recommendations led him elsewhere. ‘As I kept watching, I started seeing things like the online atheist community,’ Sherratt said, ‘which then became a gateway to the atheism community’s civil war over feminism.’ Due to a large subculture of YouTube atheists who opposed feminism, ‘I think I fell down that rabbit hole a lot quicker,’ he said.”