The Next Web: Facebook and YouTube aren’t even trying to enforce the Alex Jones ban

The Next Web: Facebook and YouTube aren’t even trying to enforce the Alex Jones ban. “After Alex Jones was effectively banned from the internet — or at least his major distribution channels — last August, it appeared that we’d be rid of his half-baked conspiracy theories once and for all. Or, that’s what we thought, anyway…. It didn’t take long for Jones to feel the heat from the rest of the internet’s major players, including Apple, Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, and a handful of others. Each banned Jones, and InfoWars, permanently, from their respective platforms citing reasons ranging from simple terms of service violations, to actively inciting violence or promoting hate speech. But regardless of their actions against him, Jones is proving resilient, like a digital cockroach.”

The Quint: Social Media Becoming Source of Radicalisation, Says Army Chief

The Quint: Social Media Becoming Source of Radicalisation, Says Army Chief. “Asserting that terrorism is becoming ‘a new form of warfare’, Army chief General Bipin Rawat said on Wednesday, 9 January, that the menace is spreading like a ‘multi-headed monster’ and is ‘here to stay’ as long as states continue to use it as state policy. Rawat, speaking at a panel discussion at the Raisina Dialogue in New Delhi, also said that there was a need to control social media as it was becoming a tool to spread radicalisation.”

TechCrunch: Hackers are spreading Islamic State propaganda by hijacking dormant Twitter accounts

TechCrunch: Hackers are spreading Islamic State propaganda by hijacking dormant Twitter accounts. “Hackers are using a decade-old flaw to target and hijack dormant Twitter accounts to spread terrorist propaganda, TechCrunch has learned. Many of the affected Twitter accounts appeared to be hijacked in recent days or weeks — some longer — after years of inactivity. A sudden shift in tone or the language used in tweets often gives away the hijack — usually a single tweet in Arabic, sometimes praising Allah or retweeting propaganda from another account.”

CNET: Facebook’s and social media’s fight against fake news may get tougher

CNET: Facebook’s and social media’s fight against fake news may get tougher. “The shift toward ephemeral content and messaging could fundamentally alter how we use Facebook and other social media, while also making it harder to combat misinformation, election interference and hate speech, some experts say. After all, it’s hard for companies to crack down when they can’t see what’s being shared in encrypted messages, or when photos and videos disappear after 24 hours. And while Facebook and others are investing in AI to spot and remove messages that violate their online rules, they still face a tough road ahead.”

The Daily Beast: How YouTube Built a Radicalization Machine for the Far-Right

The Daily Beast: How YouTube Built a Radicalization Machine for the Far-Right. “For David Sherratt, like so many teenagers, far-right radicalization began with video game tutorials on YouTube. He was 15 years old and loosely liberal, mostly interested in ‘Call of Duty’ clips. Then YouTube’s recommendations led him elsewhere. ‘As I kept watching, I started seeing things like the online atheist community,’ Sherratt said, ‘which then became a gateway to the atheism community’s civil war over feminism.’ Due to a large subculture of YouTube atheists who opposed feminism, ‘I think I fell down that rabbit hole a lot quicker,’ he said.”

Reuters: YouTube, under pressure for problem content, takes down 58 million videos in quarter

Reuters: YouTube, under pressure for problem content, takes down 58 million videos in quarter . “YouTube took down more than 58 million videos and 224 million comments during the third quarter based on violations of its policies, the unit of Alphabet Inc’s (GOOGL.O) Google said on Thursday in an effort to demonstrate progress in suppressing problem content.”

The Atlantic: Don’t Shut Down the Internet’s Biggest Jihadist Archive

The Atlantic: Don’t Shut Down the Internet’s Biggest Jihadist Archive. “If you discover that your neighbor—a decent guy and a known history buff—maintains a small collection of Nazi memorabilia, you might not think less of him, especially if his record of tolerance and anti-fascism is beyond reproach. Now imagine that he maintains not a small collection but the largest in the world, in private or public hands. He lets anyone examine it, including actual Nazis, without asking for a name or a reason. How big does the collection have to get before you start murmuring with the neighbors, and stop inviting him to cookouts and seders?”