AdWeek: Twitter Users Are Blocking Hundreds of Brands in the Hopes of Pressuring the Platform to Remove Alex Jones

AdWeek: Twitter Users Are Blocking Hundreds of Brands in the Hopes of Pressuring the Platform to Remove Alex Jones. “Tens of thousands of Twitter users this morning blocked hundreds of accounts associated with major brands like Nike, Pepsi and Uber in an effort to pressure the embattled social media platform into permanently banning controversial far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones.”

CNN: Twitter says Infowars hasn’t ‘violated our rules.’ It looks like that’s not the case

CNN: Twitter says Infowars hasn’t ‘violated our rules.’ It looks like that’s not the case. “Twitter’s vice president for trust and safety, Del Harvey, told employees in an email on Wednesday that if far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones and his fringe media organization InfoWars had posted to Twitter the same content that led YouTube and Facebook to take action against Jones and InfoWars, Twitter would have done something too.” CNN found InfoWars content on Twitter that violate’s Twitter’s TOS. The content disappeared shortly after this was pointed out to Twitter. It’s not clear if Twitter deleted it or if someone from InfoWars did.

University of Maine: Sporer uses Twitter to research criminological behavior online

University of Maine: Sporer uses Twitter to research criminological behavior online. “In the modern era of social media, more than 300 million people use Twitter to share news and engage in online conversations. This provides a glimpse into the minds of a diverse public – making Twitter a useful tool for researchers to study people who sympathize and promote extreme violence. Dr. Karyn Sporer, associate professor of sociology, is analyzing a subsample of more than 4,300 tweets looking for emerging themes that justify violence. One of her goals is to help agencies find strategies to counter violent extremism and radicalization.”

The Conversation UK: How tech companies are successfully disrupting terrorist social media activity

The Conversation UK: How tech companies are successfully disrupting terrorist social media activity “In June 2017, Google, Facebook, Twitter and Microsoft announced the formation of the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism (GIFCT). The aim of this industry-led initiative is to disrupt the terrorist exploitation of its services. Recently, GIFCT members hailed the achievements of its first year of operations. But, while this progress must be acknowledged, significant challenges remain.”

Google Plus new favourite of extremist groups: Report (The Quint)

The Quint: Google Plus new favourite of extremist groups: Report. “With social media sites like Facebook and Twitter coming down heavily on people sharing violent content, extremist groups appear to be migrating to Google Plus to popularise their propaganda, the media reported. According to a report in The Independent on Saturday, Google acknowledged the issue by saying it had ‘more to do’ in order to properly address it and had put dedicated teams in place to do so.”