Lifehacker: How To Survive A Facebook Hack

Lifehacker: How To Survive A Facebook Hack. “Here we go again. Radware’s threat research group recently announced that more than 40,000 Facebook users were duped into downloading a ‘Relieve Stress Paint’ application, via a crafty phishing email, that stole their login credentials and browser cookies while they pretend-painted in the app. Worse, the attack was clever enough to avoid being flagged by a typical antivirus app. So, how can you keep your data safe in these instances? Let’s review…”

CBN News: Strange Bedfellows? Why Facebook Is Teaming Up with Churches to Build Community

CBN News: Strange Bedfellows? Why Facebook Is Teaming Up with Churches to Build Community. “On a recent April Sunday morning, crowds streamed into the grand lobby of Mt. Zion Baptist Church as they faithfully do every weekend. What was unusual about this particular service was who was there to greet them. Smiling faces offered bright, warm ‘hellos,’ inviting them to visit laptop stations designed to teach people how to better engage with other members through the church’s social media. But the friendly greeters weren’t church staff or volunteers. They were a professional team sent by Facebook.”

CBC: Political campaigns are targeting you on Facebook. Help us find out how.

CBC: Political campaigns are targeting you on Facebook. Help us find out how.. “Around 23 million Canadians use Facebook every month, and with elections looming in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick and a federal campaign next year, those users will no doubt be besieged by political ads on the social media platform. But unlike on TV and radio, political ads online are not strictly regulated.”

New York Times: Facebook’s Current Status With Advertisers? It’s Complicated

New York Times: Facebook’s Current Status With Advertisers? It’s Complicated. “Advertisers are the lifeblood of Facebook, and the vast, personal reach of the social network has been a marketer’s dream. But now, some companies are taking a harder look at how they work with it and hunting for skeletons in their own data closets.”

Lifehacker: How to Share Facebook Posts With Non-Facebook Friends

Lifehacker: How to Share Facebook Posts With Non-Facebook Friends. “Pervasive as Facebook is, not everyone uses the social service. Maybe they hate social networking, or they’re frustrated with Facebook’s continual privacy ‘oopsies,’ or they’re not technologically savvy. In this week’s installment of Tech 911, a readers asks how they can share content outside of Facebook’s (somewhat) walled garden.”

Thinknum: Here are the top places people check-in and take selfies on Facebook

Thinknum: Here are the top places people check-in and take selfies on Facebook. “When Facebook ($NASDAQ:FB) opened up its ‘Were Here’ counters in 2012, marketers and investors alike foamed at their respectives mouths like hungry cats. That’s because for the first time, they had a social media metric that combined how people perceived a brand online with real-world location data. Facebook’s Were Here count measures how many check-ins, mobile device shares, and photo location tags have been created at a business. It’s a powerful measurement tool because it shows where Facebook users are actually going when they’re not just sitting at home clicking “Like” buttons. We’ve been tracking Were Here counts at Thinknum for years.”

ZDNet: Data firm leaks 48 million user profiles it scraped from Facebook, LinkedIn, others

ZDNet: Data firm leaks 48 million user profiles it scraped from Facebook, LinkedIn, others. “Localblox, a Bellevue, Wash.-based firm, says it ‘automatically crawls, discovers, extracts, indexes, maps and augments data in a variety of formats from the web and from exchange networks.’ Since its founding in 2010, the company has focused its collection on publicly accessible data sources, like social networks Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, and real estate site Zillow to name a few, to produce profiles. But earlier this year, the company left a massive store of profile data on a public but unlisted Amazon S3 storage bucket without a password, allowing anyone to download its contents.”