TechCrunch: Facebook speeds up AI training by culling the weak

TechCrunch: Facebook speeds up AI training by culling the weak. “Training an artificial intelligence agent to do something like navigate a complex 3D world is computationally expensive and time-consuming. In order to better create these potentially useful systems, Facebook engineers derived huge efficiency benefits from, essentially, leaving the slowest of the pack behind.”

The Hill: Supreme Court declines to hear Facebook facial recognition case

The Hill: Supreme Court declines to hear Facebook facial recognition case. “The Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to take up a high-profile court battle over whether users can sue Facebook for using facial recognition technology on their photos without proper consent. The high court rejected Facebook’s bid to review the case, meaning the social media giant will likely have to face the multibillion-dollar class-action lawsuit over whether it violated an Illinois privacy law.”

The Verge: Facebook accused of shutting out mobile competitors in lawsuit

The Verge: Facebook accused of shutting out mobile competitors in lawsuit. “The suit, which is seeking class-action status, argues that the company ‘identified and categorized potential market threats, then extinguished those threats’ by cutting them off from access to data on its platform. Facebook, the suit alleges, “moved aggressively to shut out entirely direct competitors,” like WeChat, by revoking access to its platform.”

Tubefilter: UFC Signs 3-Show Deal With Facebook Watch, Aiming To Promote Its PPV Matches

Tubefilter: UFC Signs 3-Show Deal With Facebook Watch, Aiming To Promote Its PPV Matches. “UFC is trying to boost its number of pay-per-viewers by investing in Facebook content. The mixed martial arts organization has signed a deal to produce three exclusive shows for Facebook Watch over the next year, Variety reports. All three shows will tie into UFC events, the majority of which are pay-per-view matches.”

Columbia Journalism Review: Who is right about political ads, Twitter or Facebook?

Columbia Journalism Review: Who is right about political ads, Twitter or Facebook? . “As the 2020 federal election draws closer, the issue of online political advertising is becoming more important, and the differences in how the platforms are approaching it are more obvious. Twitter has chosen to ban political advertising, but questions remain about how it plans to define that term, and whether banning ads will do more harm than good. Meanwhile, Facebook has gone in the opposite direction, saying it will not even fact-check political ads. So whose strategy is the best, Twitter’s or Facebook’s?”

TechCrunch: Cambridge Analytica email chain with Facebook sheds new light on data misuse scandal

TechCrunch: Cambridge Analytica email chain with Facebook sheds new light on data misuse scandal. “Cambridge Analytica whistleblower Brittany Kaiser has released new documents today that illuminate the initial jockeying between the company and Facebook as they discussed the need for Cambridge Analytica to delete data associated with 87 million Facebook users’ profiles. The data was improperly obtained in 2014 by researchers with access to Facebook’s developer platform who were being paid by Cambridge Analytica to obtain and process social media users’ information for the purpose of targeting political ads.”