Newswise: Facebook plays vital role in reducing government corruption, researchers find

Newswise: Facebook plays vital role in reducing government corruption, researchers find. “In new research recently published in the journal Information Economics and Policy, Sudipta Sarangi of the Virginia Tech Department of Economics said his cross-country analysis using data from more than 150 countries shows the more Facebook penetrates public usage, the higher the likelihood of government corruption meeting protest. In short, Sarangi said social media serves as peer of the press.”

NYT: Facebook Briefly Suspends Account of Outspoken Chinese Billionaire

New York Times: Facebook Briefly Suspends Account of Outspoken Chinese Billionaire. “Guo Wengui, a Chinese-born billionaire who lives in America, has recently publicized accusations of corruption against family members of top-ranking Chinese Communist Party officials. This week, China’s government asked Interpol to issue a request for his arrest. On Friday, Facebook suspended Mr. Guo’s account. After Mr. Guo complained publicly, Facebook said the suspension had been a mistake, and his account was restored.”

University of Florida: What Makes a Better Facebook Post

University of Florida: What Makes a Better Facebook Post . “Health organizations are increasingly turning to social media to distribute information and engage with their target audiences. But getting people involved is more complicated than simply posting to Facebook. New research out of the University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications by Yulia Strekalova, research assistant professor and director of Grants Development, and Rachel Damiani, a graduate student, suggests that the way Facebook posts are worded has an impact on who engages with them.”

Marketing Land: Hands on with Facebook’s AR Studio to create Snapchat-like camera effects

Marketing Land: Hands on with Facebook’s AR Studio to create Snapchat-like camera effects. “People can upload 2D and 3D image assets, then arrange them into selfie masks, animated augmented-reality environments or a mix of both and play around with them in an in-app simulator. They can even test the masks on a diverse gallery of actors to ensure they work for everyone and write code to control their animations and access off-Facebook data, like a map of someone’s latest run. Facebook’s AR Studio is rolling out in a closed beta, so it will be a while until most people get their hands on it. Luckily, during its F8 developer conference in San Jose, Calif., this week, Facebook hosted a series of sessions and erected a booth to demo the software. Here is what it’s like to use.”

TechCrunch: Facebook will license its new 360 cameras that capture in six degrees of freedom

TechCrunch: Facebook will license its new 360 cameras that capture in six degrees of freedom. “On day two of Facebook’s F8 conference, Facebook’s CTO Mike Schroepfer showed off designs for two new 360 cameras that the company is going to help push to market. The x24, with 24 cameras, and its little brother the x6, with six cameras, can each capture in six degrees of freedom for more immersive 360 content. Facebook plans to license the designs of the two cameras to select commercial partners to get each to market later this year.”

Johns Hopkins: Technology could allow Facebook users to type 100 words per minute—using only their thoughts

Johns Hopkins: Technology could allow Facebook users to type 100 words per minute—using only their thoughts. “The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab is working on new technology to support a Facebook project focused on developing a silent speech interface that will allow users to type 100 words per minute—five times faster than typing on a smartphone—using only their thoughts.”

Forbes: Why Don’t Social Media Companies Stop Violent Imagery?

Forbes: Why Don’t Social Media Companies Stop Violent Imagery?. “The intense media coverage this past week of the so-called ‘Facebook killer’ drew attention once again to the horrific ways in which social media platforms can provide a global audience to people who wish to do themselves or others grievous harm and indeed begs the question of whether in the absence of such instant fame would at least some of these acts have been prevented?”