Slate: Who’s Behind That Beard?

I mentioned this on RB briefly back in July, but now it’s launched! Slate: Who’s Behind That Beard?. “Together with Ron Coddington (editor of the magazine Military Images), Paul Quigley (director of the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies), and a group of student researchers at Virginia Tech, [Kurt] Luther crafted a free and easy-to-use website that applies facial recognition to the multitude of anonymous portraits that survive from the conflict, in the hopes of identifying the sitter.”

Fast Company: These portraits were painted to confuse facial recognition AI

Fast Company: These portraits were painted to confuse facial recognition AI. “How do you have to distort a face so that facial recognition algorithms no longer see a face–and evade the technology that has become so pervasive in our world? That was the question the Seoul-based artistic duo Shin Seung Back and Kim Yong Hun posed to a group of 10 different painters. The result is their series Nonfacial Portrait, a striking collection of painted portraits that evade the algorithms.”

Tenth Amendment Center: New York Bill Would Limit Surveillance Databases, Hinder Federal Spy Programs

Tenth Amendment Center: New York Bill Would Limit Surveillance Databases, Hinder Federal Spy Programs. “A bill introduced in the New York Assembly would prohibit the state from creating any database containing aggregate surveillance data including ALPR, audio, video and facial recognition records. Passage would not only protect privacy in New York; it would also put major roadblocks in front of federal surveillance programs.”

The Intercept: IBM Used NYPD Surveillance Footage To Develop Technology That Lets Police Search By Skin Color

The Intercept: IBM Used NYPD Surveillance Footage To Develop Technology That Lets Police Search By Skin Color. “While facial recognition technology, which measures individual faces at over 16,000 points for fine-grained comparisons with other facial images, has attracted significant legal scrutiny and media attention, this object identification software has largely evaded attention. How exactly this technology came to be developed and which particular features the software was built to catalog have never been revealed publicly by the NYPD. Now, thanks to confidential corporate documents and interviews with many of the technologists involved in developing the software, The Intercept and the Investigative Fund have learned that IBM began developing this object identification technology using secret access to NYPD camera footage.”

The Verge: New facial recognition tool tracks targets across different social networks

The Verge: New facial recognition tool tracks targets across different social networks. “Today, researchers at Trustwave released a new open-source tool called Social Mapper, which uses facial recognition to track subjects across social media networks. Designed for security researchers performing social engineering attacks, the system automatically locates profiles on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and other networks based on a name and picture.”

The Next Web: Inside Google’s plan to stalk your social media accounts

The Next Web: Inside Google’s plan to stalk your social media accounts. “Google, once again, is excited about social media. But not in the ways you might think; this isn’t about another in a failed string of chat apps, or the knockout success that never was in Google Plus. Instead, it’s an entirely new way of recognizing human faces, and one made possible by — you guessed it — creeping on your social media profiles.”