Wired: Facebook’s ’10 Year Challenge’ Is Just a Harmless Meme—Right?

Wired: Facebook’s ’10 Year Challenge’ Is Just a Harmless Meme—Right?. “Imagine that you wanted to train a facial recognition algorithm on age-related characteristics and, more specifically, on age progression (e.g., how people are likely to look as they get older). Ideally, you’d want a broad and rigorous dataset with lots of people’s pictures. It would help if you knew they were taken a fixed number of years apart—say, 10 years.”

TechCrunch: Popsugar’s Twinning app was leaking everyone’s uploaded photos

TechCrunch: Popsugar’s Twinning app was leaking everyone’s uploaded photos . “I thought the worst thing about Popsugar’s Twinning tool was that it matched me with James Corden. Turns out, the hundreds of thousands of selfies uploaded to the tool were easily downloadable by anyone who knew where to look.”

Reuters: U.S. judge dismisses suit versus Google over facial recognition software

Reuters: U.S. judge dismisses suit versus Google over facial recognition software. “A lawsuit filed against Google by consumers who claimed the search engine’s photo sharing and storage service violated their privacy was dismissed on Saturday by a U.S. judge who cited a lack of ‘concrete injuries.'”

TechCrunch: Google agrees not to sell facial recognition tech, citing abuse potential

TechCrunch: Google agrees not to sell facial recognition tech, citing abuse potential . “In recent months, pressure has been mounting for major tech firms to develop strong policies regarding facial recognition. Microsoft has helped lead the way on that front, promising to put in place stricter policies, calling for greater regulation and asking fellow companies to follow suit. Hidden toward the end of a blog post about using artificial intelligence to benefit health clinics in Asia, Google SVP Kent Walker affirmed the company’s commitment not to sell facial recognition APIs. The executive cites concerns over how the technology could be abused.”

Phys .org: I used facial recognition technology on birds

Phys .org: I used facial recognition technology on birds. “As a birder, I had heard that if you paid careful attention to the head feathers on the downy woodpeckers that visited your bird feeders, you could begin to recognize individual birds. This intrigued me. I even went so far as to try sketching birds at my own feeders and had found this to be true, up to a point. In the meantime, in my day job as a computer scientist, I knew that other researchers had used machine learning techniques to recognize individual faces in digital images with a high degree of accuracy. These projects got me thinking about ways to combine my hobby with my day job. Would it be possible to apply those techniques to identify individual birds?”

Slate: Who’s Behind That Beard?

I mentioned this on RB briefly back in July, but now it’s launched! Slate: Who’s Behind That Beard?. “Together with Ron Coddington (editor of the magazine Military Images), Paul Quigley (director of the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies), and a group of student researchers at Virginia Tech, [Kurt] Luther crafted a free and easy-to-use website that applies facial recognition to the multitude of anonymous portraits that survive from the conflict, in the hopes of identifying the sitter.”

Fast Company: These portraits were painted to confuse facial recognition AI

Fast Company: These portraits were painted to confuse facial recognition AI. “How do you have to distort a face so that facial recognition algorithms no longer see a face–and evade the technology that has become so pervasive in our world? That was the question the Seoul-based artistic duo Shin Seung Back and Kim Yong Hun posed to a group of 10 different painters. The result is their series Nonfacial Portrait, a striking collection of painted portraits that evade the algorithms.”