LowKey cool: This web app will tweak your photos to flummox facial-recognition systems, apparently (The Register)

The Register: LowKey cool: This web app will tweak your photos to flummox facial-recognition systems, apparently . “The application, called LowKey, is intended to protect people from unauthorized surveillance. It’s based on an adversarial attack technique developed by University of Maryland boffins Valeriia Cherepanova, Micah Goldblum, Shiyuan Duan, John Dickerson, Gavin Taylor, Tom Goldstein, and US Naval Academy researcher Harrison Foley. It alters images so facial recognition systems can’t easily use the data to find the depicted person in another image.”

The Verge: Civil rights groups move to block expansion of facial recognition in airports

The Verge: Civil rights groups move to block expansion of facial recognition in airports. “A coalition of civil rights groups led by the American Civil Liberties Union have filed an objection to the proposed expansion of Customs and Border Protections facial recognition at land and sea ports. The National Immigration Law Center, Fight for the Future, and the Electronic Frontier Foundation are also participating in the motion, alongside twelve others.”

CNBC: China’s Huawei tested A.I. software that could identify Uighur Muslims and alert police, report says

CNBC: China’s Huawei tested A.I. software that could identify Uighur Muslims and alert police, report says. “Huawei, together with one of China’s biggest artificial intelligence (AI) firms Megvii, tested a facial recognition system that could be used to detect members of a minority Muslim group and send alerts to authorities, a new report claims.”

CNET: Facial recognition’s fate could be decided in 2021

CNET: Facial recognition’s fate could be decided in 2021. “The dumpster fire that was 2020 has also set the stage for what could be the biggest development in facial recognition and how it gets regulated. In the past year, lawmakers, privacy advocates, lawsuits and local legislative measures have all rallied against the technology as a tool for surveillance and law enforcement. Several crucial decisions in the next year will steer its future.”

CNET: Facial recognition is getting better at making matches around face masks

CNET: Facial recognition is getting better at making matches around face masks. “Scientists agree that face masks are here to stay, and research finds that facial recognition technology is starting to catch up. Since the start of the pandemic, facial recognition providers have been working to get around the coverings, and they’ve gotten marginally better, results from a US government study shows.”

Biometric Update: Report says lack of diversity in face biometrics datasets extends to expression, emotion

Biometric Update: Report says lack of diversity in face biometrics datasets extends to expression, emotion . “An academic study on ‘Facial Expressions as a Vulnerability in Face Recognition’ from four researchers associated with MIT, Barcelona’s Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, and the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, suggests that databases with greater balance of facial expressions should be used to train facial recognition models. The lack of diverse expressions could create a security vulnerability, the researchers suggest, impacting the matching scores returned by facial recognition systems.”

TNW: This AI tool generates your creepy lookalikes to trick facial recognition

TNW: This AI tool generates your creepy lookalikes to trick facial recognition. “If you’re worried about facial recognition firms or stalkers mining your online photos, a new tool called Anonymizer could help you escape their clutches. The app was created by Generated Media, a startup that provides AI-generated pictures to customers ranging from video game developers creating new characters to journalists protecting the identities of sources.”

Vancouver Sun: Grizzly bear facial recognition promises to revolutionize wildlife management

Vancouver Sun: Grizzly bear facial recognition promises to revolutionize wildlife management. “A facial recognition system for grizzly bears could usher in a new wave of celebrity animals that scientists and the public could follow through their lifetimes. Biologists at the University of Victoria have teamed up with software experts to create an artificial intelligence (AI) that can recognize individual bears even though they don’t have much in the way of identifiable facial features.”

MIT Technology Review: Live facial recognition is tracking kids suspected of being criminals

MIT Technology Review: Live facial recognition is tracking kids suspected of being criminals. “In a national database in Argentina, tens of thousands of entries detail the names, birthdays, and national IDs of people suspected of crimes. The database, known as the Consulta Nacional de Rebeldías y Capturas (National Register of Fugitives and Arrests), or CONARC, began in 2009 as a part of an effort to improve law enforcement for serious crimes. But there are several things off about CONARC. For one, it’s a plain-text spreadsheet file without password protection, which can be readily found via Google Search and downloaded by anyone.”

Los Angeles Times: Despite past denials, LAPD has used facial recognition software 30,000 times in last decade, records show

Los Angeles Times: Despite past denials, LAPD has used facial recognition software 30,000 times in last decade, records show. “The Los Angeles Police Department has used facial recognition software nearly 30,000 times since 2009, with hundreds of officers running images of suspects from surveillance cameras and other sources against a massive database of mug shots taken by law enforcement. The new figures, released to The Times, reveal for the first time how commonly facial recognition is used in the department, which for years has provided vague and contradictory information about how and whether it uses the technology.”

Techdirt: Clearview Hires Prominent First Amendment Lawyer To Argue For Its Right To Sell Scraped Data To Cops

Techdirt: Clearview Hires Prominent First Amendment Lawyer To Argue For Its Right To Sell Scraped Data To Cops. “Clearview — the facial recognition company selling law enforcement agencies (and others) access to billions of photos and personal info scraped from the web — is facing lawsuits over its business model, which appears to violate some states’ data privacy laws. It’s also been hit with cease-and-desist requests from a number of companies whose data has been scraped…. Now, the company appears to be going on the offensive.”