Sociable: Facial recognition is the new polygraph test for insurers

Sociable: Facial recognition is the new polygraph test for insurers. “Insurance companies in Asia are beginning to use facial recognition to record client interviews, so they can spot when customers are lying. Beyond the obvious positive consequence of a reduction in fraud, who will actually benefit and is there potential for over-reach?”

South China Morning Post: Chinese programmer shuts down AI project to detect women in porn videos after backlash

South China Morning Post: Chinese programmer shuts down AI project to detect women in porn videos after backlash. “A Chinese programmer has apologised and shut down an artificial intelligence project that used facial recognition technology to detect whether women had appeared in porn videos, after it set off a storm of criticism.”

New York Times: Images of Travelers Stolen in Cyberattack on Border Agency

New York Times: Images of Travelers Stolen in Cyberattack on Border Agency. “Tens of thousands of images of travelers and license plates stored by the Customs and Border Protection agency have been stolen in a cyberattack, officials said Monday, prompting renewed questions about how the federal government secures and shares personal data.”

The Verge: Facial recognition smart glasses could make public surveillance discreet and ubiquitous

The Verge: Facial recognition smart glasses could make public surveillance discreet and ubiquitous. “From train stations and concert halls to sport stadiums and airports, facial recognition is slowly becoming the norm in public spaces. But new hardware formats like these facial recognition-enabled smart glasses could make the technology truly ubiquitous, able to be deployed by law enforcement and private security any time and any place.”

MakeUseOf: 4 Ways to Avoid Facial Recognition Online and in Public

MakeUseOf: 4 Ways to Avoid Facial Recognition Online and in Public. “Many people are concerned about facial recognition software being used to track their movements and the threat to civil liberties that this software poses. While this issue is being debated, there are steps you can take to avoid some facial recognition software, both online and in person.”

ACLU: The FBI Has Access to Over 640 Million Photos of Us Through Its Facial Recognition Database

ACLU: The FBI Has Access to Over 640 Million Photos of Us Through Its Facial Recognition Database. “At a House Oversight Committee hearing this week with an FBI witness, we learned new details that further confirm our fears that the FBI’s face recognition apparatus continues to balloon, threatening our fundamental liberties. The details also underscore the urgent need for Congress to put the brakes on law enforcement use of this powerful technology. Here are some of the most concerning details we learned from the hearing…”

Engadget: Microsoft discreetly wiped its massive facial recognition database

Engadget: Microsoft discreetly wiped its massive facial recognition database. “Microsoft has been vocal about its desire to properly regulate facial recognition technology. The company’s president, Brad Smith, appealed directly to Congress last year to take steps to manage the tech, which he says has ‘broad societal ramifications and potential for abuse.’ Such are the company’s concerns that it even blocked the sales of the tech to California police forces. Now, Microsoft is continuing its crusade by quietly deleting its MS Celeb database, which contains more than 10 million images of some 100,000 people.”