The Register: Facebook used facial recognition without consent 200,000 times, says South Korea’s data watchdog

The Register: Facebook used facial recognition without consent 200,000 times, says South Korea’s data watchdog . “Facebook, Netflix and Google have all received reprimands or fines, and an order to make corrective action, from South Korea’s government data protection watchdog, the Personal Information Protection Commission (PIPC). The PIPC announced a privacy audit last year and has revealed that three companies – Facebook, Netflix and Google – were in violations of laws and had insufficient privacy protection.”

The Verge: Most US government agencies are using facial recognition

The Verge: Most US government agencies are using facial recognition. “A new report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that 19 of the 24 US government agencies surveyed are using facial recognition in some way, illustrating how commonplace the controversial technology has become within the federal government. The list of agencies includes agencies like the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that maintain in-house systems, alongside smaller agencies that use the system to control access to high-security locations.”

Washington Post: China built the world’s largest facial recognition system. Now, it’s getting camera-shy.

Washington Post: China built the world’s largest facial recognition system. Now, it’s getting camera-shy.. “Guo Bing, a law professor in the Chinese city of Hangzhou, liked the zoo enough to purchase an annual pass. But he didn’t like it nearly enough to let the zoo take a high-resolution scan of his face. In what judges called the first case of its kind in China, Guo sued the zoo — and won.”

Ubergizmo: iOS 15’s Photos Will Be Better At Recognizing People

Ubergizmo: iOS 15’s Photos Will Be Better At Recognizing People. “One of the features of a lot of photo sharing platforms is facial recognition. This is something that Apple has built into its own Photos app. For the most part, we have to say that it does a good job at picking out faces, even if it’s in a group photo, but when it comes to photos where faces are partially hidden or obscured, then that’s when it falters.”

Gizmodo: 25 States Are Forcing Face Recognition on People Filing for Unemployment

Gizmodo: 25 States Are Forcing Face Recognition on People Filing for Unemployment. “We acclimatize to dangerous tech creep in a series of f*ck-it moments until the point at which we realize a foreseeably bad network is so pervasive, we reluctantly adopt it and move on. There was a time when social media, Amazon shopping, and home surveillance seemed optional—until they weren’t. Now in many states, you’ll have to surrender a faceprint to a private face recognition program in order to access basic government services like unemployment insurance. We’ve been here before.” Asterisk by me because I like these newsletters having some chance of getting through corporate filters.

CNET: Black teen kicked out of skating rink after facial recognition error

CNET: Black teen kicked out of skating rink after facial recognition error. “Public outcry against facial recognition software is on the rise this week as the parents of a Black teenager consider legal action against a Detroit-area roller-skating rink, accusing the rink of racially profiling their daughter with the technology. The rink banned teen Lamya Robinson on Saturday, according to a report from Fox 2 Detroit, accusing her of participating in a public brawl, after the rink’s facial recognition software wrongly identified her as a previous patron.”

TNW: This manual for a popular facial recognition tool shows just how much the software tracks people

TNW: This manual for a popular facial recognition tool shows just how much the software tracks people. “Lawmakers, privacy advocates, and civil rights organizations have also pushed against facial recognition because of error rates that disproportionately hurt people of color. A 2018 research paper from Joy Buolamwini and Timnit Gebru highlighted how facial recognition technology from companies like Microsoft and IBM is consistently less accurate in identifying people of color and women.”

The Cybersecurity 202: Activists and lawmakers increase calls for ban on federal use of facial recognition technology (Washington Post)

Washington Post: The Cybersecurity 202: Activists and lawmakers increase calls for ban on federal use of facial recognition technology. “A new report by the Government Accountability Office, the federal government’s main watchdog, makes it all the more necessary that the technology be banned at the federal level, they argue. At least 20 U.S. government agencies have deployed facial recognition technology since 2015, with many not knowing which systems they’re using, the nonpartisan watchdog found. The watchdog recommended that many of the agencies better track the systems and assess their risks.”

Techdirt: Clearview Forbids Users From Scraping Its Database Of Images It Scraped From Thousands Of Websites

Techdirt: Clearview Forbids Users From Scraping Its Database Of Images It Scraped From Thousands Of Websites . “Clearview called out Google’s apparent hypocrisy on the subject of site scraping when Google sent a cease-and-desist demanding it stop harvesting images and data from Google’s online possessions. But Clearview is apparently unable to recognize its own hypocrisy. While it’s cool with site scraping when it can benefit from it, it frowns upon others perpetrating this ‘harm’ on its own databases.”

Facial recognition, fake identities and digital surveillance tools: Inside the post office’s covert internet operations program (Yahoo News)

Yahoo News: Facial recognition, fake identities and digital surveillance tools: Inside the post office’s covert internet operations program. “The post office’s law enforcement arm has faced intense congressional scrutiny in recent weeks over its Internet Covert Operations Program (iCOP), which tracks social media posts of Americans and shares that information with other law enforcement agencies. Yet the program is much broader in scope than previously known and includes analysts who assume fake identities online, use sophisticated intelligence tools and employ facial recognition software, according to interviews and documents reviewed by Yahoo News.”

CNET: Amazon sales of facial recognition software to police on pause indefinitely

CNET: Amazon sales of facial recognition software to police on pause indefinitely. “Amazon isn’t ready to begin sales of its facial recognition software to law enforcement agencies when a year-long moratorium expires in June. The company didn’t announce a new deadline, and the suspension of sales of the Rekognition software will stay in place until further notice, as reported earlier by Reuters.”

Los Angeles Times: Citizen app posts image of wrong man as arson suspect in Palisades fire

Los Angeles Times: Citizen app posts image of wrong man as arson suspect in Palisades fire. “An image of a young man was sent on the Citizen personal safety app to users in the Los Angeles basin after a brush fire broke out late Friday night and quickly grew…. But there was one problem: The man was not the person identified by an LAPD observer in a helicopter as the one seen igniting multiple fires that eventually swelled to consume more than 1,300 acres between Pacific Palisades and Topanga Canyon.”

CNN: A false facial recognition match sent this innocent Black man to jail

CNN: A false facial recognition match sent this innocent Black man to jail. “While facial recognition technology has become increasingly accurate, research has shown it is drastically more prone to error when trying to match the faces of darker skinned people. And because no federal guidelines exist to limit or standardize the use of facial recognition by law enforcement, states — and, more often, municipalities — are left to decide for themselves what, if anything, to do to control its use.”