Washington Post: Twitter labels Trump’s tweets with a fact check for the first time

Washington Post: Twitter labels Trump’s tweets with a fact check for the first time. “The move, which escalates tensions between Washington and Silicon Valley in an election year, was made in response to two Trump tweets over the past 24 hours. The tweets falsely claimed that mail-in ballots are fraudulent. Twitter’s label says, ‘Get the facts about mail-in ballots,’ and redirects users to news articles about Trump’s unsubstantiated claim.”

EurekAlert: Red-flagging misinformation could slow the spread of fake news on social media

EurekAlert: Red-flagging misinformation could slow the spread of fake news on social media. “A new study on the spread of disinformation reveals that pairing headlines with credibility alerts from fact-checkers, the public, news media and even AI, can reduce peoples’ intention to share. However, the effectiveness of these alerts varies with political orientation and gender. The good news for truth seekers? Official fact-checking sources are overwhelmingly trusted.”

Infotagion: Free Fact-Check Service To Stop Coronavirus Disinformation (Hollywood Insider)

Hollywood Insider: Infotagion: Free Fact-Check Service To Stop Coronavirus Disinformation. “Infotagion is a free online-based, independent, fact-checking service for COVID-19. This ingenious new website examines information about COVID-19 that is shared on websites and other publishing platforms online. Users are encouraged to send a screenshot or link of an article to Infotagion’s website, where it will be disseminated by their fact-checking team. If the information cannot be unquestionably verified by official sources such as the World Health Organization or Center for Disease Control, Infotagion will post the article or viral thread on their website with a ‘Factcheck’ headline. Each article is marked with a tag clarifying the key information in the article. Tags include false, misleading, true, and unconfirmed.”

Poynter: Have you become a personal fact-checker to your family and friends?

Poynter: Have you become a personal fact-checker to your family and friends?. it me. “For years, I heard friends who are doctors talk about people who approach them in parties, concerts and even soccer games to ask medical questions or have a quick appointment. Since mid-March, when the World Health Organization declared that the planet was experiencing a COVID-19 pandemic and a tsunami of misinformation, I have empathized with doctors. I have become a sort of personal fact-checker for a huge group of family and friends, people who reach me daily on WhatsApp, Slack, Facebook Messenger, Instagram or email.”

Waterford Live: Irish researchers address coronavirus myths on brilliant new website

Waterford Live: Irish researchers address coronavirus myths on brilliant new website. “Members of the public can submit any health claims they are curious about to the iHealthFacts website. A team of researchers in NUI Galway have established a process for assessing prioritised health claims by searching for evidence to support or refute the claim. The prepared responses are also reviewed by a team of Evidence Advisors from NUI Galway, UCD, TCD, UL, UCC and RCSI and by a panel of Public and Patient Advisors (PPI Ignite, NUI Galway). The result is a short, easy to read, clearly presented response to help the public make informed decisions about their own health.”

Fighting the Infodemic: The #CoronaVirusFacts Alliance (Poynter)

Poynter: Fighting the Infodemic: The #CoronaVirusFacts Alliance. “Led by the International Fact-Checking Network (IFCN) at the Poynter Institute, the #CoronaVirusFacts / #DatosCoronaVirus Alliance unites more than 100 fact-checkers around the world in publishing, sharing and translating facts surrounding the novel coronavirus.”

Poynter: Hoaxes about coronavirus tests have political uses and can push patients away

Poynter: Hoaxes about coronavirus tests have political uses and can push patients away. “Who has the right to be tested for the 2019 coronavirus? Only those with symptoms, or also those who are in quarantine but feeling fine? How much does the test cost? Will uninsured people have to pay out of pocket? Or is the government covering testing costs? Over the past week, the volume of false answers to those questions on social media caught the attention of fact-checkers that are part of the #CoronaVirusFacts/#DatosCoronaVirus alliance.”