Mashable: The AI-powered fact checker that investigates QAnon influencers shares its secret weapon

Mashable: The AI-powered fact checker that investigates QAnon influencers shares its secret weapon. “Founded in 2017 by CEO Lyric Jain, [Logically] combines its AI tech with human fact-checking experts in order to uncover, track, archive, and debunk conspiracy theories ranging from QAnon to misinformation about COVID-19. The company already has a few public-facing products, such as mobile apps and web browser extensions to help users navigate online misinformation they may come across throughout their everyday internet use.”

MisinfoCon: An introduction to Propwatch — the world’s first visual database of propaganda techniques

MisinfoCon: An introduction to Propwatch — the world’s first visual database of propaganda techniques. “Propwatch uses its pioneering web platform to initiate the inoculation process. Our unique platform catalogs and cross-references embedded video segments, so visitors… can see propaganda techniques being executed in real-time, and not only learn to identify the techniques, but to understand how and why they work.”

10,300 documented falsehoods in 12 months: the CoronaVirusFacts Alliance enters its second year (Poynter)

Poynter: 10,300 documented falsehoods in 12 months: the CoronaVirusFacts Alliance enters its second year. “The alliance is the largest fact-checking collaboration in history, and its database currently holds more than 10,300 fact-checks about the pandemic. In 12 months, 260,000 unique visitors viewed the Alliance’s landing page on the Poynter Institute website a total of 345,000 times. That’s nearly 1,000 pageviews a day.”

NBC News: Twitter launches ‘Birdwatch,’ a forum to combat misinformation

NBC News: Twitter launches ‘Birdwatch,’ a forum to combat misinformation. “The new system allows users to discuss and provide context to tweets they believe are misleading or false. The project, titled Birdwatch, is a standalone section of Twitter that will at first only be available to a small set of users, largely on a first-come, first-served basis. Priority will not be provided to high-profile people or traditional fact-checkers, but users will have to use an account tied to a real phone number and email address.”

Poynter: What to expect from fact-checking in 2021

Poynter: What to expect from fact-checking in 2021. “2020 has likely been the most chaotic year in the 21st century and certainly an overwhelming one for fact-checkers. The coronavirus pandemic not only shook the world in an unprecedented way, but it also redesigned how fact-checkers work, how we learn from one another and, most importantly, how we collaborate not only locally but globally.”

Poynter: The CoronaVirusFacts Alliance gets a global showcase at the Paris Peace Forum

Poynter: The CoronaVirusFacts Alliance gets a global showcase at the Paris Peace Forum. “The CoronaVirusFacts Alliance, a collection of 99 fact-checking organizations from over 70 countries that produced over 9,000 COVID-19 fact-checks in 43 different languages, received global recognition from the virtually assembled audience at the third annual Paris Peace Forum on Thursday.”

Fast Company: Facebook’s big redesign broke News Feed extensions—including some fact-checkers

Fast Company: Facebook’s big redesign broke News Feed extensions—including some fact-checkers. “In May of this year, Facebook started rolling out a major redesign for its website, with a more modern look, big navigation buttons on top, and a greater emphasis on Groups. While the overhaul was overdue, it also turned several third-party browser extensions into collateral damage, including ones that help users evaluate the trustworthiness of news stories and customize their feeds.”

Poynter: Fact-checkers offer additional suggestions for how to improve Facebook ahead of the 2020 presidential election

Poynter: Fact-checkers offer additional suggestions for how to improve Facebook ahead of the 2020 presidential election. “After Facebook announced plans Thursday to scale back on political ads and increase voter information ahead of the 2020 elections, fact-checkers offered some additional suggestions for how the tech platform might handle potential misinformation.”

Poynter: The Fact-Checking Development Grant has awarded 22 projects in 12 countries. Meet the grant winners

Poynter: The Fact-Checking Development Grant has awarded 22 projects in 12 countries. Meet the grant winners. “The Fact-Checking Development Fund will support 22 projects from 12 countries. The winners, who are splitting $1 million from received from YouTube (via the Google News Initiative), will develop new tools to improve fact-checking workflows, new formats to reach new audiences and, especially, use video to disseminate accurate information. Twelve of the 22 awarded projects will focus on videos, five will test formats and five will develop new ways to speed up the fact-checking process.”

Poynter: Automated fact-checking can catch claims that slip past human checkers. Here are the two ways they work.

Poynter: Automated fact-checking can catch claims that slip past human checkers. Here are the two ways they work.. “Although media literacy is essential to turning the tide, the use of automation and algorithms could help conduct fact-checking efforts at scale. In his 2018 report, Lucas Graves essentially identified two types of automated fact-checking: fact-checks that verify claims by validating them against an authoritative source or a story that had already been verified, and fact-checks that rely on ‘secondary signals’ such as stance detection — a computing technique that determines whether a piece of text agrees or disagrees with a claim. Here is an overview of journalistic uses and research projects looking at both aspects.”

BuzzFeed News: Facebook’s Preferential Treatment Of US Conservatives Puts Its Fact-Checking Program In Danger

BuzzFeed News: Facebook’s Preferential Treatment Of US Conservatives Puts Its Fact-Checking Program In Danger. “Since at least late 2016, CEO Mark Zuckerberg has defended Facebook by insisting it should not be ‘an arbiter of truth,’ while creating a third-party fact-checking program to fill that role of umpire. But journalists and researchers at the dozens of organizations that make up Facebook’s fact-checking operation say the company is often just that. Some told BuzzFeed News they were surprised to learn their verdicts had been ignored or overruled by Facebook in a closed-door process with little transparency, and warned that this risks undermining the program’s credibility.”

New York Times: Fighting False News in Ukraine, Facebook Fact Checkers Tread a Blurry Line

New York Times: Fighting False News in Ukraine, Facebook Fact Checkers Tread a Blurry Line. “StopFake, like all of Facebook’s outside fact checkers, signed a pledge to be nonpartisan and not to focus its checks ‘on any one side.’ But in recent weeks, StopFake has been battling accusations of ties to the Ukrainian far right and of bias in its fact-checking. The episode has raised thorny questions for Facebook over whom it allows to separate truth from lies — and who is considered a neutral fact checker in a country at war.”

CNN: Twitter’s rigid fact-check rules allow Trump to continue spreading false information about the election

CNN: Twitter’s rigid fact-check rules allow Trump to continue spreading false information about the election. “The world took notice on May 26, when Twitter fact-checked President Donald Trump for the very first time. Trump posted a series of blatant lies about mail-in voting, and declared that ‘this will be a rigged election.’ Twitter responded swiftly, saying that the viral posts contained “potentially misleading” information, and slapped a fact-check label on them. But seven weeks later, and after a dozen similarly untruthful tweets from the President, that extraordinary step by Twitter looks more like a one-time aberration than the new normal.”

Poynter: Fact-checkers take a look back at their work fighting COVID-19

Poynter: Fact-checkers take a look back at their work fighting COVID-19. “In Europe, fact-checking organizations Maldita.es, Full Fact, Pagella Politica/Facta, Correctiv, and Agence France-Presse collaborated to study the themes and spread of misinformation across the continent. The report found similar types of misinformation correlated with the virus’s progress through each European country. For example, a hoax about chemical spraying helicopters started in Italy during its initial outbreak and spread across the continent as the virus progressed. More surprising, said Maldita.es co-founder Clara Jimenez, were the viral hoaxes that did not spread outside each country’s borders.”