Poynter: This website impersonated a fact-checking outlet to publish fake news stories

Poynter: This website impersonated a fact-checking outlet to publish fake news stories. “Someone is publishing fake news stories on a website that looks like a fact-checking organization. On Wednesday, Brazilian fact-checker Aos Fatos published an investigation about a fake news website that had ripped off its brand to publish bogus content. Instead of AosFatos.org, the network published to AosFatos.com.”

Nieman Lab: Individually, people aren’t great at judging news sources. En masse, they’re almost the same as professional fact-checkers

Nieman Lab: Individually, people aren’t great at judging news sources. En masse, they’re almost the same as professional fact-checkers. “Building on a draft paper from last year, psychologists Gordon Pennycook and David Rand have a new study showing that people across the political spectrum rate mainstream news sources as more trustworthy than hyperpartisan and fake news sites — and that ‘politically balanced layperson ratings were strongly correlated with ratings provided by professional fact-checkers.'”

CNBC: Snopes quits fact-checking partnership with Facebook

The person who resisted the urge to headline this “SNOPES NOPES” is a better person than me. CNBC: Snopes quits fact-checking partnership with Facebook. “Snopes, a fact-checking organization, announced on Friday its decision to end its partnership with Facebook, which has been ramping its efforts to curb misinformation on its services since the 2016 U.S. election.”

Poynter: Want to get away with posting fake news on Facebook? Just change your website domain.

Poynter: Want to get away with posting fake news on Facebook? Just change your website domain.. “One of the most frequently debunked fake news publishers on Facebook is still getting past the platform’s fact-checking system — and it’s doing it by using the simplest of tricks. In the fall, YourNewsWire, one of the most infamous misinformers on the internet, migrated its site and rebranded as News Punch.”

Poynter: A glitch in Facebook’s fact-checking system isn’t notifying some users who share false posts

Poynter: A glitch in Facebook’s fact-checking system isn’t notifying some users who share false posts. “If it weren’t for a glitch in Facebook’s fact-checking partnership, one of this week’s biggest viral hoaxes might not have reached as many people. In Brazil, a false meme posted Jan. 14 that claimed a federal judge ordered prisons to remove power outlets got nearly 200,000 engagements on Facebook. That’s in spite of two debunks published days later by fact-checkers at Aos Fatos and Agência Lupa, which both partner with Facebook to find, debunk and decrease the reach of misinformation on the platform.”

Poynter: This hoax got 250 times more Facebook engagements than two fact checks combined

Poynter: This hoax got 250 times more Facebook engagements than two fact checks combined. “In the second installment of our new weekly column Fact vs. Fake, Poynter compared the reach of several top-performing fact checks on Facebook with the hoaxes they debunked. What we found was that falsities found a large audience in every country we examined — with topics running the gamut from supermarket price hikes in France to spending for Donald Trump’s border wall in the United States.”

Yorkton This Week: Technology near for real-time TV political fact checks

Yorkton This Week: Technology near for real-time TV political fact checks. “A Duke University team expects to have a product available for election year that will allow television networks to offer real-time fact checks onscreen when a politician makes a questionable claim during a speech or debate. The mystery is whether any network will choose to use it.”