Poynter: Number of fact-checking outlets surges to 188 in more than 60 countries

Poynter: Number of fact-checking outlets surges to 188 in more than 60 countries. “The number of fact-checking outlets around the world has grown to 188 in more than 60 countries amid global concerns about the spread of misinformation, according to the latest tally by the Duke Reporters’ Lab.”

New York Intelligencer: Five Signs a Viral Story Is Fake

New York Intelligencer: Five Signs a Viral Story Is Fake. “The benefit to stories like these popping up so frequently is that they become easier to spot. Once you know the formula, it’s hard to read past a tweet or two before checking out, knowing full well what you’re reading is just fiction. And not particularly nuanced fiction at that. Here’s a checklist for what you should be keeping an eye out for.”

Recommended TED-Ed video: This one weird trick will help you spot clickbait

As you might remember I watch a lot of YouTube. (No worries about political stuff, though Self Sufficient Me might have radicalized me to plant collards in raised garden beds.) Over the weekend, I saw TED-Ed’s video This one weird trick will help you spot clickbait . It’s just over five and a half minutes long and looks at different ways to spot problems with stories based on medical research. It’s simple but well-presented and got my husband and I into a good conversation about headlines and news stories. Recommended.

Pew: An update on our research into trust, facts and democracy

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): An update on our research into trust, facts and democracy “A little over a year ago, Pew Research Center decided to intensify its research focus on the theme of trust, facts and democracy. The decision reflected a changing world: In the U.S. and abroad, anxiety over misinformation has increased alongside political polarization and growing fragmentation of the media. Faith in expertise and institutions has declined, cynicism has risen, and citizens are becoming their own information curators. All of these trends are fundamentally changing the way people arrive at the kind of informed opinions that can drive effective governance and political compromise.”

Poynter: We taught more than 5,500 teenagers fact-checking skills this week. Here’s what we learned.

Poynter: We taught more than 5,500 teenagers fact-checking skills this week. Here’s what we learned.. “Hey y’all, it’s Daniel. In this newsletter, we spend a lot of time reporting on and analyzing some of the internet’s biggest problems — and how fact-checkers do (or don’t) help solve them. But this week, I have some good news for you: The kids are alright.”

Poynter: What’s Crap on WhatsApp? is the winner of the 2019 Fact Forward Fund

Poynter: What’s Crap on WhatsApp? is the winner of the 2019 Fact Forward Fund. “For the next 12 months, a team led by Africa Check’s Deputy Chief Editor Kate Wilkinson and Volume’s co-founder Paul McNally, will work to expand the success achieved by the pilot of ‘What’s Crap on WhatsApp?.’ Launched May 3, the voice note show was 5 minutes long and dealt with different false stories that were going viral on WhatsApp in South Africa the previous month. One falsity, for example, was an image that showed Zimbabweans burning South African trucks in the border. Using the audio sharing feature, professional fact-checkers were able to debunk it.”