Facebook ‘Way too little, way too late’: Facebook’s factcheckers say effort is failing (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Facebook
‘Way too little, way too late’: Facebook’s factcheckers say effort is failing
. “Journalists working for Facebook say the social media site’s fact-checking tools have largely failed and that the company has exploited their labor for a PR campaign. Several fact checkers who work for independent news organizations and partner with Facebook told the Guardian that they feared their relationships with the technology corporation, some of which are paid, have created a conflict of interest, making it harder for the news outlets to scrutinize and criticize Facebook’s role in spreading misinformation.”

Poynter: For American fact-checkers working around gaps in government data, a lesson from Argentina

Poynter: For American fact-checkers working around gaps in government data, a lesson from Argentina. “Gaps in information frustrate the work of fact-checkers. But what about when a government agency creates them? ‘To know that the data has been tracked in the past and is maybe still tracked currently and is not being released — that just seems like a step backward,’ said Angie Holan, editor of PolitiFact (a project of the Poynter-owned Tampa Bay Times). Her concern stems from a recent change to the FBI’s 2016 crime report, which FiveThirtyEight reports now has close to 70 percent fewer tables than the 2015 version. Among the data tables missing in the report — the first to come out under the Trump administration’s FBI — is specific information about arrests, homicides and the only national estimate of gang-related murders.”

Google Blog: Building trust online by partnering with the International Fact Checking Network

Google Blog: Building trust online by partnering with the International Fact Checking Network. “Today, thousands of fact check articles appear on Google in Search results, on Google News, and across the open web. Fact checking articles—when a journalist looks at one single statement or issue and either verifies or debunks it—is important in today’s climate because it helps readers better understand viral news stories and relevant issues. That’s why we’re supporting the organizations who do the hard work of fact checking so that we can make it available in Google Search. Today we’re announcing a new partnership with the International Fact-Checking Network (IFCN) at The Poynter Institute.”

Phys.org: Fact checkers outperform historians when evaluating online information

Phys.org: Fact checkers outperform historians when evaluating online information. “How do expert researchers go about assessing the credibility of information on the internet? Not as skillfully as you might guess – and those who are most effective use a tactic that others tend to overlook, according to scholars at Stanford Graduate School of Education. A new report released recently by the Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) shows how three different groups of “expert” readers – fact checkers, historians and Stanford undergraduates – fared when tasked with evaluating information online.”

First Draft: First Draft launches its online verification training course

First Draft: First Draft launches its online verification training course. “In this course, we teach you the steps involved in verifying the eyewitness media, fabricated websites, visual memes and manipulated videos that emerge on social media. The course is designed so that anyone can take the course from start to finish online, or educators can take elements and integrate into existing classroom teaching. For newsroom training managers, we hope the you can encourage your staff to take the course online, or you can take individual videos and tutorials and use during brown-bag lunches. We provide relevant and topical examples — from events such as Hurricane Irma and the conflict in Syria — to show how these skills and techniques are put into practice.”

Google Serves Fake News Ads in an Unlikely Place: Fact-Checking Sites (New York Times)

New York Times: Google Serves Fake News Ads in an Unlikely Place: Fact-Checking Sites. “The headlines are eye-catching. Melania Trump is leaving the White House! Home renovation cable star Joanna Gaines has abandoned her HGTV show and husband Chip Gaines! Televangelist Joel Osteen is leaving his wife! None of the stories were true. Yet as recently as late last week, they were being promoted with prominent ads served by Google on PolitiFact and Snopes, fact-checking sites created precisely to dispel such falsehoods.”

Ubergizmo: Bing Fact Check Labels Now Visible In Search Results

Ubergizmo: Bing Fact Check Labels Now Visible In Search Results. “To combat the surge in fake news, Google started adding fact check findings to search and news results earlier this year. It started working with fact checking organizations like PolitiFact and Snopes for this purpose. Bing is now doing something similar. Microsoft’s search engine will now display a fact check label in search results to help users find fact checking information on news and webpages within search results.”