Poynter: We’re launching a podcast about fact-checking and misinformation

Poynter: We’re launching a podcast about fact-checking and misinformation. “Who is fact-checking for? How can reporters avoid amplifying bogus claims? And is fact-checking even the best way to fight online fakery? These are some of the biggest questions facing the ongoing battle against misinformation. And starting today, we’re tackling them in audio form.”

Lifehacker: Quickly Tell if a Shared News Story is Old With This Chrome Extension

Lifehacker: Quickly Tell if a Shared News Story is Old With This Chrome Extension. “Over the past year, all (well, at least most) of us have gotten a little more skeptical about what we read in the news, especially on social media. Within my own group of Facebook friends, one huge source of misinformation seems to be old news rather than inaccurate news.”

Nieman Lab: CrossCheck launches in Nigeria, with 16 newsrooms working together to fight misinformation

Nieman Lab: CrossCheck launches in Nigeria, with 16 newsrooms working together to fight misinformation. “Facebook is used by 24 million Nigerians every month, but the platform has only four people, from third-party fact-checking organizations, working to combat misinformation there, BBC Africa Eye reported earlier this year in an investigation into how fake news in the country has led to violence and murder.”

Gizmodo: When the Internet Archive Forgets

Gizmodo: When the Internet Archive Forgets. “On the internet, there are certain institutions we have come to rely on daily to keep truth from becoming nebulous or elastic. Not necessarily in the way that something stupid like Verrit aspired to, but at least in confirming that you aren’t losing your mind, that an old post or article you remember reading did, in fact, actually exist. It can be as fleeting as using Google Cache to grab a quickly deleted tweet, but it can also be as involved as doing a deep dive of a now-dead site’s archive via the Wayback Machine. But what happens when an archive becomes less reliable, and arguably has legitimate reasons to bow to pressure and remove controversial archived material?”

Poynter: Hyperpartisan Facebook groups are the next big challenge for fact-checkers

Poynter: Hyperpartisan Facebook groups are the next big challenge for fact-checkers. “[Jonathan] Albright, director of the Digital Forensics Initiative at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism, spent months digging into the analytics of Facebook posts, political ads and private groups to determine how the platform was influencing the election. The result is a three-part analysis of misinformation on the social media platform, which he published days before the United States midterms earlier this month. Three months and 1,000 screenshots later, he found that, while the technology company has made strides in limiting the spread of misinformation over the past couple of years, there’s still plenty of fakery on the platform.”

How To Evaluate Websites: A Guide For Teachers And Students (Kathleen Morris)

Kathleen Morris: How To Evaluate Websites: A Guide For Teachers And Students . “I don’t know about you, but I’ve found helping students to evaluate websites to be particularly tricky. There are lots of guidelines out there but I wanted to create a resource that reflects an effective and natural process, no matter what you’re researching or how old you are. Scroll down to find a printable flowchart for your classroom.”

Nieman Lab: If you hate the media, you’re more likely to be fooled by a fake headline

Nieman Lab: If you hate the media, you’re more likely to be fooled by a fake headline. “Don’t like the media? Think it’s all ‘lies’ or ‘fake’? Then you’re probably not as good at reading the news as your less perpetually annoyed peers. That’s one finding from a new study from the News Co/Lab at Arizona State, in collaboration with the Center for Media Engagement at the University of Texas. Those who have negative opinions of the news media are less likely to spot a fake headline, less likely to differentiate between news and opinion — but more confident in their ability to find the information they need online.”