Business Standard: Google suspends flawed fact-check feature

Business Standard: Google suspends flawed fact-check feature. “Google has suspended its fact-check feature in its Search and news results after its algorithm wrongly linked a Washington Post fact check to a Daily Caller article about US Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation team, the media reported. Noting that the feature proved to be too faulty for public use, Google attributed the decision to an investigation by The Daily Caller News Foundation after it published a story lambasting the tech giant for wrongly appending a Washington Post Fact Checker debunk to one of its stories.”

Digiday: One year in, Facebook Journalism Project gets mixed reviews from publishers

Digiday: One year in, Facebook Journalism Project gets mixed reviews from publishers. “A year ago, Facebook launched its Facebook Journalism Project. Led by Campbell Brown, the ex-NBC News anchor who was Facebook’s new head of news partnerships, the project was a high-profile effort to smooth relations with prominent news publishers. Facebook was getting blasted for the spread of fake news, contributing to filter bubbles and doing too little to help publishers make money on the platform. The challenge inherent in such a project is that publishers aren’t a monolithic group. They have a variety of different business models and want different things from Facebook.”

Global Investigative Journalism Network: Secrets to Searching for Video Footage

Global Investigative Journalism Network: Secrets to Searching for Video Footage. “Editor’s Note: Since its founding, London-based Bellingcat has made a name for itself using open source and social media investigation to investigate topics ranging from Mexican drug lords to Russian missiles in Ukraine. We’re pleased to present this piece from Bellingcat’s website on how the group searches and analyzes video clips drawn from a dozen different online platforms.”

First Draft News: New guide helps journalists, researchers investigate misinformation, memes and trolling

First Draft News: New guide helps journalists, researchers investigate misinformation, memes and trolling. “Recent scandals about the role of social media in key political events in the US, UK and other European countries over the past couple of years have underscored the need to understand the interactions between digital platforms, misleading information and propaganda, and their influence on collective life in democracies. In response to this, the Public Data Lab and First Draft collaborated last year to develop a free, open-access guide to help students, journalists and researchers investigate misleading and viral content, memes and trolling practices online. Released today, the five chapters of the guide describe a series of research protocols or ‘recipes’ that can be used to trace trolling practices, the ways false viral news and memes circulate online, and the commercial underpinnings of problematic content.”

Poynter: This website helps you find related fact checks — and it was built by a 17-year-old

Poynter: This website helps you find related fact checks — and it was built by a 17-year-old. “Instead of pool days and part-time jobs, Sreya Guha spends her summers with lines and lines of code. A senior at the Castilleja high school in Palo Alto, California, Guha has spent the past two summers creating software. Her most recent project, Related Fact Checks, lets internet users paste article links and search to see if that topic has been already debunked by a fact-checking organization.”

Lifehacker: How to Teach Your Kids to Spot Fake News

Lifehacker: How to Teach Your Kids to Spot Fake News. “How to teach kids to spot fake news? First: Teach everyone to spot fake news. When I was a child, my parents had access to only a few news sources: our local paper, the big-city dailies (for us, the Washington Post and the New York Times) and the nightly news. Kids today have … the entire internet, with every crackpot theory and faked moon landing right at their fingertips. Even the distinction between ‘media’ and ‘journalism’ has blurred to the point that many adults don’t know if anyone can be trusted at all.”

Facebook ‘Way too little, way too late’: Facebook’s factcheckers say effort is failing (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Facebook
‘Way too little, way too late’: Facebook’s factcheckers say effort is failing
. “Journalists working for Facebook say the social media site’s fact-checking tools have largely failed and that the company has exploited their labor for a PR campaign. Several fact checkers who work for independent news organizations and partner with Facebook told the Guardian that they feared their relationships with the technology corporation, some of which are paid, have created a conflict of interest, making it harder for the news outlets to scrutinize and criticize Facebook’s role in spreading misinformation.”