NiemanLab: Instagram is busy fact-checking memes and rainbow hills while leaving political lies alone

NiemanLab: Instagram is busy fact-checking memes and rainbow hills while leaving political lies alone. “It’s a tough line for Instagram to walk as it tries to filter out misinformation and bad-faith faked images while leaving art — you know, art-art, the good kind — alone. Instagram users also called out the platform this month for fact-checking a Warren Buffett meme while leaving alone politicians’ lies and political ads.”

Nieman Lab: Is this video “missing context,” “transformed,” or “edited”? This effort wants to standardize how we categorize visual misinformation

Nieman Lab: Is this video “missing context,” “transformed,” or “edited”? This effort wants to standardize how we categorize visual misinformation. “If a photo has been ’shopped, was it changed just a little or a lot? Did the editing harmlessly change the white balance or fundamentally alter the reality the photo is supposed to represent? Is a tight crop excluding important context or appropriately directing a viewer’s focus to something? Then apply all of that to videos. Where’s the line between a deepfake and a cheapfake? Your head starts to hurt. The unsung heroes of the Internet are the people who develop the standards by which information gets encoded into structured data, and said heroes are now turning their attention to this particular problem, visual misinformation. ”

Poynter: ‘What’s Crap on WhatsApp?’ has debunked 25 hoaxes in 6 episodes. What is the challenge now?

Poynter: ‘What’s Crap on WhatsApp?’ has debunked 25 hoaxes in 6 episodes. What is the challenge now?. “Since June 2019, when the International Fact-Checking Network awarded a $50,000 grant to Africa Check to develop ‘What’s Crap on WhatsApp?,’ a voice note show specially designed to be shared on the private message app, about 1,600 people have subscribed to the ‘appcast,’ which totals six episodes. In total, they have heard 25 falsehoods being debunked, 10 of them related to health issues.”

“Rated false”: Here’s the most interesting new research on fake news and fact-checking (Nieman Lab)

Nieman Lab: “Rated false”: Here’s the most interesting new research on fake news and fact-checking. “Journalist’s Resource sifts through the academic journals so you don’t have to. Here they collect the best of 2019, including research into the effectiveness of fact-checking, why people are susceptible to fake news, and the changing volume of misinformation on social media.”

Poynter: How to use your phone to spot fake images surrounding the U.S.-Iran conflict

Poynter: How to use your phone to spot fake images surrounding the U.S.-Iran conflict. “Military conflicts — like the one that is sparking between the United States and Iran — are usually surrounded by false images and outdated videos that go viral on social media. It happened in Turkey the other day. To avoid that misinformation scenario, the International Fact-Checking Network developed a step-by-step guide to teach citizens how to verify images, from asking simple and rhetorical questions to using reverse image search on cell phones.”

Reclaim the Net: Instagram’s meme fact checkers have themselves become a meme

Reclaim the Net: Instagram’s meme fact checkers have themselves become a meme. “It hasn’t even been two weeks since Facebook’s Instagram expanded its ‘fact-checking’ policy by introducing a new tool of content moderation and censorship. But the tool is working so poorly, especially when trying to assess ‘factual truthfulness’ of content like memes, which rely on comedy – that some of the 45 third-party ‘fact-checkers’ hired by Instagram, like Africa Check, are already being memefied themselves.”