San Francisco Chronicle: No, wearing a mask does not cut off your oxygen. Here are the facts.

San Francisco Chronicle: No, wearing a mask does not cut off your oxygen. Here are the facts.. “Health care professionals say wearing a face covering is one of the most effective ways to slow the spread of the coronavirus. So why do so many people refuse to do it? The Chronicle scoured social media for the most common excuses in circulation and ran them by local infectious disease experts to see whether they hold up.”

Wired: ‘Covid Parties’ Are Not a Thing

Wired: ‘Covid Parties’ Are Not a Thing. “Despite its implausibility and utter lack of valid sourcing, the fantasy of Alabama virus gamblers has nonetheless exploded across the internet, with slack-jawed coverage turning up in CNN, the New York Post, and the Associated Press, among many others.” Including this here newsletter. Silly me, I thought a city council member would not turn up and say that the state and local hospitals had confirmed something that turned out to be a bucket of bullshit. Am I dumb.

Poynter: Infrared thermometers won’t blind you, damage your neurons nor affect your meditation

Poynter: Infrared thermometers won’t blind you, damage your neurons nor affect your meditation. “People who have recently tried to resume their lives by leaving home and going to shops and restaurants have probably stopped at some temperature check control system. Usually, someone with an infrared thermometer in hand points the machine-looking tool to the client’s forehead and finds out if the person is running a fever. This device, however, is the new victim of COVID-19 falsehoods.”

Poynter: Sarah Sanders didn’t tweet this COVID-19 conspiracy theory

Poynter: Sarah Sanders didn’t tweet this COVID-19 conspiracy theory. “The tweet was like a word cloud of popular conspiracy theory topics: COVID-19, Russia, antifa and Hillary Clinton. And it looked like it came from former White House press secretary Sarah Sanders. Sanders has a couple verified Twitter accounts: @SHSanders45, where she last tweeted in 2019, @SarahHuckabee, where she actively tweets today. And she once tweeted from the handle @PressSec. But an image being shared on Facebook that looks like she tweeted a conspiracy theory from yet another account is not actually from Sanders.”

CNET: 11 coronavirus health myths, fact checked

CNET: 11 coronavirus health myths, fact checked. “Well before the coronavirus was named a pandemic by the World Health Organization, people started sharing all sorts of questionable advice on how to protect yourself from getting infected, ranging from misguided (like making your own hand sanitizer) to outright dangerous (like injecting bleach into your body). It’s reached the point where Facebook has moved to ban any ads promoting fake coronavirus cures. In an effort to get the facts straight, we’re going to bust these common coronavirus myths that have taken over our feeds.”

Verify: Contrary to social media claims, there’s no evidence Arizona is ‘double-counting’ positive tests for coronavirus (12 News)

12 News: Verify: Contrary to social media claims, there’s no evidence Arizona is ‘double-counting’ positive tests for coronavirus. “You may have noticed more than a few social media skeptics about Arizona’s soaring coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. They just don’t trust the numbers. We verified whether the state Department of Health Services, the repository of the data, is ‘double-counting’ positive coronavirus tests. On Sunday, Arizona posted a single-day record high of 3,857 cases. Before Gov. Doug Ducey reopened the state six weeks ago, 1 in 20 tests was positive. Today, 1 in every 5 tests are returning as positive, according to DHS.”

Poynter: How Faktograf worked across borders to stem COVID-19 misinformation in southeastern Europe

Poynter: How Faktograf worked across borders to stem COVID-19 misinformation in southeastern Europe. “Misinformation doesn’t care about borders, especially in southeastern Europe, where trust in the media tends to be low and news avoidance is sky-high. False news can spread quickly via popular messenger apps like Viber and WhatsApp. That has been the key takeaway from Faktograf’s COVID-19 experience. The Zagreb-based fact-checking organization knows that mis- and disinformation are as much of a problem in nearby Bosnia and Herzegovina, Slovenia, Montenegro, North Macedonia and Serbia as they are in Croatia. Tackling the issue in one country isn’t enough.”

Coronavirus: 5G and microchip conspiracies around the world (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: 5G and microchip conspiracies around the world. “Some of the most persistent conspiracy theories surrounding the coronavirus pandemic have continued to spread around the world. We’ve picked out some of the most pervasive false claims and look at how far they’ve travelled.”

Fact check: As pandemic situation worsens, Pence paints a deceptively rosy picture (CNN)

CNN: Fact check: As pandemic situation worsens, Pence paints a deceptively rosy picture. “At a Friday press briefing by the White House’s coronavirus task force, the first in nearly two months, task force leader Pence painted a rosy picture of a country steadily getting safer and back to normal. It was a picture at odds with reality. Leaving out critical information, Pence delivered a more polished version of the upbeat, all-is-well dishonesty that was a hallmark of previous briefings by President Donald Trump, who did not attend the Friday session.”

Newsweek: ‘Freedom to Breathe Agency’ Masks Exemption Cards Are Fake—How to Tell

Newsweek: ‘Freedom to Breathe Agency’ Masks Exemption Cards Are Fake—How to Tell. “While it is true that businesses are not allowed to question the nature of a person’s disability or request documentation proving the ailment, when it comes to face masks, things get tricky. A number of states including New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and others enforced rules requiring residents to wear face masks when visiting essential businesses or using public transportation due to the coronavirus pandemic back in April. In Washington state, Governor Jay Inslee issued a public health order on Tuesday requiring individuals to wear a face mask in indoor public spaces as well as outdoor public areas where social distance guidelines can’t be regulated.”

AFP Fact Checking: False social media posts claim Israel has reported zero deaths from COVID-19 due to baking soda remedy

AFP Fact Checking: False social media posts claim Israel has reported zero deaths from COVID-19 due to baking soda remedy. “Multiple posts shared repeatedly on Facebook and Twitter since March 2020 claim that Israel has reported zero deaths from the novel coronavirus, which causes the disease COVID-19. The posts also claim Israeli citizens have protected themselves from COVID-19 by drinking a remedy of hot water, lemon and baking soda, which purportedly ‘kills’ the virus. Both claims are false; as of June 21 the World Health Organization (WHO) states Israel has reported 305 deaths from COVID-19; health experts say there is no evidence the baking soda concoction can cure or prevent COVID-19 infections.”

FactCheck .org: Trump Inherited More Ventilators Than Have Been Distributed

FactCheck .org: Trump Inherited More Ventilators Than Have Been Distributed. “Contrary to President Donald Trump’s repeated claims that he inherited a Strategic National Stockpile with ’empty’ or ‘bare’ cupboards, the federal government had more ventilators in stock than it ended up distributing amid the COVID-19 pandemic, FactCheck.org has learned. The SNS had 16,660 ventilators ‘immediately available for use’ when the federal government began deploying the breathing machines to states to treat critically ill COVID-19 patients in March, according to a Department of Health and Human Services spokesperson.”

PolitiFact: Fact-checking three coronavirus claims from Texas Gov. Greg Abbott

PolitiFact: Fact-checking three coronavirus claims from Texas Gov. Greg Abbott. “Although infections and hospitalizations connected to the coronavirus are on the rise in Texas, state officials are continuing efforts to reopen parts of the state and allow people to return to their jobs. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott sought to quell fears over the virus during a press conference on Tuesday, pointing to the number of available hospital beds in the state and statistics suggesting that Texas is handling the virus better than other large states.”

Engadget: Google adds fact checking to image searches

Engadget: Google adds fact checking to image searches. “Google’s fact checking now extends beyond standard searches and YouTube. The internet pioneer has introduced fact check labels for image search results. Tap a bogus picture for a detailed view and you’ll see a blurb from a verified source indicating what’s false and offering a link to the full article debunking the image. If a photo is a known fake, you’ll find out before you start sharing it with your friends in disbelief.”

Poynter: Posts about COVID-19 vaccines bring an overdose of misinformation

Poynter: Posts about COVID-19 vaccines bring an overdose of misinformation . “The world waits anxiously for a vaccine that will halt the deaths and devastation from the coronavirus. But until that happens, fear and uncertainty are generating a gigantic list of falsehoods about this topic. Extra caution is essential when reading about COVID-19 vaccines.”