Poynter: Warnings from fact-checkers could discourage people from sharing false Facebook posts, study says

Poynter: Warnings from fact-checkers could discourage people from sharing false Facebook posts, study says. “The misinformation expert Claire Wardle, writing in the current issue of Scientific American, poses (then expertly answers) a key question for people concerned about the current state of the online information ecosystem: Why do people share misinformation, conspiracies and other kinds of misleading content on social media?”

Poynter: Misinformation doesn’t need a free and open internet to spread. Just look at Kashmir and Hong Kong.

Poynter: Misinformation doesn’t need a free and open internet to spread. Just look at Kashmir and Hong Kong.. “In Kashmir, misinformation has proliferated both in spite of and due to the absence of internet access in the region. But the Chinese government has taken the opposite approach, rapidly censoring pro-democracy speech on social media platforms and saturating the networks with propaganda and disinformation.”

NiemanLab: Finally, Instagram is getting fact-checked (in a limited way and just in the U.S., for now)

NiemanLab: Finally, Instagram is getting fact-checked (in a limited way and just in the U.S., for now). “Facebook is expanding the third-party fact-checking program that it launched on its own platform in 2016 to Instagram — something that many who watch the space have advocated for awhile. Facebook has owned Instagram for seven years; this is an expansion of a trial that began in May.”

Poynter: A guide to anti-misinformation actions around the world

Poynter: A guide to anti-misinformation actions around the world. “Spanning from Brazil to South Korea, these efforts raise questions about infringing free speech guarantees and are frequently victims of uncertainty. The muddying of the definition of fake news, the relative reach of which is still being studied, hinders governments’ ability to accomplish anything effective. In the spirit of this confusion, explained in detail in a Council of Europe report, Poynter has created a guide for existing attempts to legislate against what can broadly be referred to as online misinformation.” Wow, this extensive!

Poynter: Here comes a tool, approved by WhatsApp, to automate the distribution of fact-checks

Poynter: Here comes a tool, approved by WhatsApp, to automate the distribution of fact-checks. “The love/hate relationship between fact-checkers and reader-submitted tips from private messaging may soon be a thing of the past. Meedan, the software company behind Check, a task management system used in collaboration by fact-checkers all over the world, has unveiled a new tool that would automate responses to tipsters without ever having to bother a fact-checker.”

Nieman Lab: Investigative journalism YouTube outlet Point is raising money for a misinformation-themed video game based on real-life stories

Nieman Lab: Investigative journalism YouTube outlet Point is raising money for a misinformation-themed video game based on real-life stories. “The investigative online journalism startup Point, a London-based investigative journalism startup focusing on technology and internet culture that publishes solely via video investigations on YouTube, is running a Kickstarter to launch Misinformer, ‘a text based, detective-style mobile game that puts the player in the position of citizen journalist who has to crack a major misinformation-based conspiracy before an upcoming election.'”

Poynter: Fact-checkers personally targeted by partisan attacks

Poynter: Fact-checkers personally targeted by partisan attacks. “Darko Brkan was still living in his parents’ house when he read an article that identified him as the owner of several apartment properties, a man who enjoyed a jetsetting, lavish lifestyle of travel and luxury. This was news to Brkan, the founding president of the media NGO Zašto Ne which hosts the fact-checking platform Raskrinkavanje in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In fact, he read this about himself in the conservative newspaper Avaz while in Capetown, South Africa, attending Global Fact 6 — a trip paid for by the International Fact-Checking Network (IFCN), since he couldn’t have afforded to attend otherwise.”