Poynter: Louisiana lawmakers wrongly say a name change for Pfizer’s vaccine scuttles the FDA’s approval

Poynter: Louisiana lawmakers wrongly say a name change for Pfizer’s vaccine scuttles the FDA’s approval. “In August, the Food and Drug Administration gave full and final approval to the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer for people 16 and older. But 10 Republican Louisiana lawmakers allege ‘there is no FDA approval for the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine for COVID-19.’ The state representatives put that in bold at the top of a Sept. 29 letter to Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards. No, it’s not like those lawmakers didn’t get the memo on FDA approval. They saw it, but they tried to make the argument that it didn’t count.”

Poynter: Claims that millions of people have died from the COVID-19 vaccine are unfounded

Poynter: Claims that millions of people have died from the COVID-19 vaccine are unfounded. “The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, also called VAERS, is an official public government database where anyone can submit any potential adverse health effect following a vaccine. However, the reports are not verified, and the system itself warns that reports can contain information that is incomplete, inaccurate, coincidental or unverifiable. When used improperly, VAERS can be a source for misinformation.”

AFP Fact Check: Graphic photos do not show Melbourne protesters wounded by rubber bullets

AFP Fact Check: Graphic photos do not show Melbourne protesters wounded by rubber bullets. “Facebook and Instagram posts are sharing photos they claim show protesters wounded by rubber bullets at an anti-lockdown march in Melbourne, Australia. The claim is false; the photos were taken after protests in Argentina and the United States.” Clarification: reading that excerpt you may infer that the protests in Argentina and the US were about covid. They were not. The pictures were taken long before 2020.

A Nobel Prize and a horse dewormer: Explaining the controversy over ivermectin and COVID-19 (PolitiFact)

PolitiFact: A Nobel Prize and a horse dewormer: Explaining the controversy over ivermectin and COVID-19. “Even as prescriptions for ivermectin have risen 24-fold since before the pandemic, and some people have resorted to pressuring hospitals to use it on COVID-19 patients, public health authorities strongly recommend against using ivermectin for COVID-19. There is no conclusive evidence that it is effective, and it carries physical risks. At the same time, those dubiously touting ivermectin aren’t wrong about the Nobel Prize or the drug’s proven but limited uses for humans. ”

Poynter: Another air quality monitor demonstration fails to show masks reduce oxygen to children

Poynter: Another air quality monitor demonstration fails to show masks reduce oxygen to children. “The air we breathe is made up of about 78% nitrogen by volume, 21% oxygen and much smaller amounts of argon, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and other gases. In the video, the man apparently alludes to the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which regulates workplaces. OSHA defines an atmosphere that is less than 19.5% oxygen as oxygen-deficient, and potentially unsafe. So the reference to ‘19.5 parts per million’ in the video misstates the safety threshold. That unit of measurement is typically used to describe the concentration of chemical contaminants in water or soil, or trace amounts of a gas; 19.5 ppm is not a plausible reading of oxygen concentration in the atmosphere at a school board meeting.”

Study: Crowds can wise up to fake news (MIT News)

MIT News: Study: Crowds can wise up to fake news . “In the face of grave concerns about misinformation, social media networks and news organizations often employ fact-checkers to sort the real from the false. But fact-checkers can only assess a small portion of the stories floating around online. A new study by MIT researchers suggests an alternate approach: Crowdsourced accuracy judgements from groups of normal readers can be virtually as effective as the work of professional fact-checkers.”

Poynter: Thalidomide, morning-sickness drug that caused disabilities, wasn’t FDA-approved for pregnant women

Poynter: Thalidomide, morning-sickness drug that caused disabilities, wasn’t FDA-approved for pregnant women. “Thalidomide was widely prescribed to pregnant mothers around the world before it was shown to cause thousands of cases of babies born with disabilities, such as missing and malformed limbs. But the post gets a key fact wrong: The FDA didn’t approve thalidomide for pregnant women.”

Kids, Masks And Mental Health: Navigating The Myths (University of Utah Health)

University of Utah Health: Kids, Masks And Mental Health: Navigating The Myths. “Addressing the misinformation about the mental and physical barriers that wearing a mask in school may bring – University of Utah Health experts weigh in. Face masks have been identified as one of the crucial tools to help stop the spread of COVID-19 yet the debate over whether they work or are necessary has been ongoing since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. ”

CNET: Coronavirus ‘doomsday variant’ headlines are wrong — and dangerous

CNET: Coronavirus ‘doomsday variant’ headlines are wrong — and dangerous. “In short, there’s no reason to panic. There’s no doomsday variant (we don’t name variants this way) and there’s little evidence this new mutant strain is worse than delta. ‘There is no evidence it is particularly transmissible and it has not been flagged as a variant under interest so far,’ says Francois Balloux, a computational biologist at University College London.”