Poynter: How ‘War on Fakes’ uses fact-checking to spread pro-Russia propaganda

Poynter: How ‘War on Fakes’ uses fact-checking to spread pro-Russia propaganda. “War on Fakes claims to be a fact-checking service…. But a review by PolitiFact shows that its ‘fact-checks’ are actually pieces of disinformation that use well-known techniques of Russian propaganda — incoherence, a high volume of claims, repetition and the statement of obvious falsehoods— to confuse readers trying to understand what is happening in Ukraine.”

Poynter: Fact-checkers extend their global reach with 391 outlets, but growth has slowed

Poynter: Fact-checkers extend their global reach with 391 outlets, but growth has slowed. “Since last year’s census, we have added 51 sites to our global fact-checking map and database. In that same 12 months, another seven fact-checkers closed down. While this vital journalism now appears in at least 69 languages on six continents, the pace of growth in the international fact-checking community has slowed over the past several years.”

NiemanLab: Factchequeado launches to combat misinformation in Spanish-speaking communities in the U.S.

NiemanLab: Factchequeado launches to combat misinformation in Spanish-speaking communities in the U.S.. “Factchequeado, a team of five, is a service journalism project and its model is based on collaboration. It partners with English- and Spanish-language publications in the U.S. that want to republish its fact-checks and explainers. In return, Factchequeado asks that the organizations help them reach broader audiences and learn more about their news and information consumption habits by sharing its WhatsApp chatbot number.”

Poynter: What a database of fact checks about the war in Ukraine can teach us about misinformation

Poynter: What a database of fact checks about the war in Ukraine can teach us about misinformation. “Ukraine Facts, an initiative that gathered fact checks about Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, gave researchers access to a repository of data on the war. A study out of Kosovo has done just that, gleaning valuable insights into the sphere of mis- and disinformation. The study, conducted by International Fact-Checking Network verified signatory hibrid.info in partnership with Hasan Prishtina University, uses Ukraine Fact’s database to examine data related to false information spread, both in Kosovo and the rest of the world.”

The Social Media Lab at Ryerson University: Introducing The Russia-Ukraine ConflictMisinfo.org Dashboard

This is from the end of February but I completely missed it and haven’t seen mentions of it anywhere. The Social Media Lab at Ryerson University: Introducing The Russia-Ukraine ConflictMisinfo.org Dashboard . “The dashboard is an information management tool for monitoring online misinformation and disinformation about the Russia-Ukraine war. It tracks and visualizes debunked claims from hundreds of trusted fact-checkers based around the world, such as AFP, Reuters, and others. The dashboard is available in English, Ukrainian and Russian.”

Poynter: These viral videos are not from the Russian invasion of Ukraine

Poynter: These viral videos are not from the Russian invasion of Ukraine. “For the past few weeks, we’ve watched the crisis in Ukraine unfold on social media. But misinformation follows a crisis. We’re seeing a ton of false or out-of-context photos and videos going viral online, claiming to show what’s really happening in Ukraine. Here are three methods you can use to fact-check these types of posts, both on desktop and mobile.”

Cancer FactFinder website launched to provide fact-based, reliable information about causes of cancer (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health)

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health: Cancer FactFinder website launched to provide fact-based, reliable information about causes of cancer. “A team led by the Zhu Family Center for Global Cancer Prevention at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Center for Cancer Equity and Engagement at the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center has launched Cancer FactFinder (https://cancerfactfinder.org/), a new website that provides accurate and reliable information about what does and does not cause cancer.”

Bellingcat: Russia’s Bucha “Facts” Versus the Evidence

Bellingcat: Russia’s Bucha “Facts” Versus the Evidence. “Initial reports from human rights organisations on the actions of Russian forces have detailed violence targeting civilians. Interviews with local residents, meanwhile, have accused Russian troops of carrying out summary executions of unarmed men over suspicions they had fought for Ukrainian armed forces in the Donbas in 2014, or even ‘simply for having a tattoo of Ukraine’s national emblem’. Russian officials have pushed back against these claims.”

AFP Fact Checker: Fake CNN tweet shared in posts accusing broadcaster of fabricating ‘Ukraine bomb’ story

AFP Fact Checker: Fake CNN tweet shared in posts accusing broadcaster of fabricating ‘Ukraine bomb’ story . “Multiple social media posts claim CNN fabricated a story about a ‘bomb attack’ at the hotel of a journalist in Ukraine in a tweet that actually showed an old photo of a hotel in Serbia. However, CNN reported no such story and said the tweet was fake. The screenshot of the doctored tweet features the social media handle of a prankster who has previously shared fake CNN tweets.”

Ukraine’s volunteer online army: Meet the ‘cyber elves’ fighting Russian trolls on Facebook (USA Today)

USA Today: Ukraine’s volunteer online army: Meet the ‘cyber elves’ fighting Russian trolls on Facebook. “When Henrikas Savickis is not performing at the National Theater or strumming a guitar with his drama students, this 51-year-old actor, singer and teacher from the Lithuanian city of Kaunas has an unusual side hustle. He’s a keyboard warrior on the frontlines of the Russian offensive in Ukraine. For four to five hours a day since the invasion began, Savickis fires up his laptop to shoot down pro-Kremlin conspiracy theories and falsehoods spread by Russian operatives who camouflage their activities by posing as Lithuanian citizens.”

Poynter: There is no evidence that Putin invaded Ukraine to ‘crush child traffickers’

I’m not intending to index each fact check I come across, but I will include the occasional one here for context. Poynter: There is no evidence that Putin invaded Ukraine to ‘crush child traffickers’. “According to one narrative being shared on social media, Russia has a noble aim for its war against Ukraine: to end child trafficking there. ‘Putin vows to “crush” child traffickers in Ukraine,’ read what looked like a headline in a screenshot shared March 2 on Facebook. The headline came from Real Raw News, an outlet known for sharing misinformation, including a similar claim on Ukraine that PolitiFact rated False.”

Romea: Russia distorting photos for propaganda purposes, Roma nonprofits alert Ukrainian authorities

Romea: Russia distorting photos for propaganda purposes, Roma nonprofits alert Ukrainian authorities. “Photographs from Lviv, Ukraine in which several Romani people are shown as bound with their backs against pillars and with green paint on their faces are being disseminated through social media along with the untrue claim that the individuals in the photographs are internally displaced people from Kyiv who were unjustifiably attacked by local Ukrainians immediately upon arrival in Lviv. However, as the Romea.cz news server has discovered, the actual context of the photos is something else.”

Euronews: Debunking the most viral misinformation about Russia’s war in Ukraine

Euronews: Debunking the most viral misinformation about Russia’s war in Ukraine . “In times of conflict and crisis, when people are hungry for details about the war in Ukraine, misinformation can be equally as viral as verified facts. Here is a selection of some of the false claims that had been widely circulating and have since been debunked by fact-checkers.” Appears to be updated on a regular basis.