University of Exeter: Efforts to take fake news and misinformation in Africa must take account of the continent’s unique “pavement media”, study shows

University of Exeter: Efforts to take fake news and misinformation in Africa must take account of the continent’s unique “pavement media”, study shows. “The spread of fake news through ‘pavement media’ in Africa means the continent needs unique techniques to tackle the spread of misinformation, a new study says. Discussions about current affairs in marketplaces, places of worship, bars, and other social spaces, and through songs, sermons, and graffiti form a key part of the media ecosystem in Africa.”

Ars Technica: “Hacker X”—the American who built a pro-Trump fake news empire—unmasks himself

Ars Technica: “Hacker X”—the American who built a pro-Trump fake news empire—unmasks himself. “For two years, he ran websites and Facebook groups that spread bogus stories, conspiracy theories, and propaganda. Under him was a dedicated team of writers and editors paid to produce deceptive content—from outright hoaxes to political propaganda—with the supreme goal of tipping the 2016 election to Donald Trump. Through extensive efforts, he built a secret network of self-reinforcing sites from the ground up. He devised a strategy that got prominent personalities—including Trump—to retweet misleading claims to their followers. And he fooled unwary American citizens, including the hacker’s own father, into regarding fake news sources more highly than the mainstream media.”

University of Dayton: “Fake News” and the First Amendment

University of Dayton: “Fake News” and the First Amendment. “Please join three of the America’s leading First Amendment scholars, Helen Norton, Jonathan Varat and Eugene Volokh on Wednesday, March 31, 2021 from 3:30 – 5 p.m. (EDT), for an online panel discussion of a potential state statute banning fake news.” The event is free but requires registration.

Research note: The scale of Facebook’s problem depends upon how ‘fake news’ is classified (Misinformation Review)

Misinformation Review: Research note: The scale of Facebook’s problem depends upon how ‘fake news’ is classified. “Ushering in the contemporary ‘fake news’ crisis, Craig Silverman of Buzzfeed News reported that it outperformed mainstream news on Facebook in the three months prior to the 2016 US presidential elections. Here the report’s methods and findings are revisited for 2020. Examining Facebook user engagement of election-related stories, and applying Silverman’s classification of fake news, it was found that the problem has worsened, implying that the measures undertaken to date have not remedied the issue. If, however, one were to classify ‘fake news’ in a stricter fashion, as Facebook as well as certain media organizations do with the notion of ‘false news’, the scale of the problem shrinks.”

CSUDH: Faculty Researchers Provide In-Depth Analysis of Fake News

CSUDH: Faculty Researchers Provide In-Depth Analysis of Fake News. “Researches at California State University, Dominguez Hills (CSUDH) have released the results of a study that provides an in-depth understanding of who produces and spreads ‘fake news,’ and who is duped by it. The findings are part of a larger study on the psychological constructs associated with fake news consumers and producers.”

Arizona State University: Study finds brief exposure to ‘fake news’ can affect beliefs on climate change

Arizona State University: Study finds brief exposure to ‘fake news’ can affect beliefs on climate change. “Exposure to fake news about climate change may impact people’s belief in human-caused climate change and weaken their perceptions of the scientific consensus on climate change. New research from Arizona State University Assistant Professor Caitlin Drummond evaluates how a short exposure to fake news headlines affects people’s scientific beliefs and attitudes.”

New study: Eyes linger less on ‘fake news’ headlines (Phys .org)

Phys .org: New study: Eyes linger less on ‘fake news’ headlines. “The term ‘fake news’ has been a part of our vocabulary since the 2016 US presidential election. As the amount of fake news in circulation grows larger and larger, particularly in the United States, it often spreads like wildfire. Subsequently, there is an ever-increasing need for fact-checking and other solutions to help people navigate the oceans of factual and fake news that surround us. Help may be on the way, via an interdisciplinary field where eye-tracking technology and computer science meet. A study by University of Copenhagen and Aalborg University researchers shows that people’s eyes react differently to factual and false news headlines.”

University of Texas at Austin: Effective New Tool Created for Discerning Fake News

University of Texas at Austin: Effective New Tool Created for Discerning Fake News. ” We hear a lot about fake news, but do we know it when we see it Research from The University of Texas at Austin has found that although Facebook users may be too quick to believe or share misinformation, flagging fake news can make a significant difference. In fact, the study, published online [August 13] by Information Systems Research, shows that platforms can reduce the extent to which their users fall for and spread fake news articles by deploying a better designed fake news flag.”