Via Boing Boing: This X Does Not Exist

Found at Boing Boing: This X Does Not Exist. From the front page: “Using generative adversarial networks (GAN), we can learn how to create realistic-looking fake versions of almost anything, as shown by this collection of sites that have sprung up in the past month.” There are 36 sites here, from ones you’ve probably heard of (This Person Does Not Exist) to ones that might have escaped your attention (This Beach Does Not Exist, This Horse Does Not Exist).

Slate: The Pin Is Mightier

Slate: The Pin Is Mightier. “A friend of mine, an attorney at a nonprofit legal agency, was following up on a case for a client she’d met at a small-claims clinic the day before. As she used Google Maps to search for an address the client had provided, she noticed a featured pin for a nearby ‘lodge’ with a peculiar name: ‘Balls deep in the bullshit.’”

Search Engine Land: The majority of listings for car accident attorneys on Google are fake

Search Engine Land: The majority of listings for car accident attorneys on Google are fake. “If you work with attorneys, you may have noticed recently that there is a massive amount of spam that seems to be growing like weeds in Google’s local results. Let me explain what I mean. This was a search done earlier this week in a prominent zip code in Manhattan, New York. All three of these listings in the three-pack are fake.”

Intelligencer: How Much of the Internet Is Fake? Turns Out, a Lot of It, Actually.

Intelligencer: How Much of the Internet Is Fake? Turns Out, a Lot of It, Actually.. “How much of the internet is fake? Studies generally suggest that, year after year, less than 60 percent of web traffic is human; some years, according to some researchers, a healthy majority of it is bot. For a period of time in 2013, the Times reported this year, a full half of YouTube traffic was ‘bots masquerading as people,’ a portion so high that employees feared an inflection point after which YouTube’s systems for detecting fraudulent traffic would begin to regard bot traffic as real and human traffic as fake. They called this hypothetical event ‘the Inversion.’”

Wired: This Browser Extension Is Like An Antivirus For Fake Photos

Wired: This Browser Extension Is Like An Antivirus For Fake Photos. “Doctored images are the scourge of the web-wide fight against fake news. Tech companies and researchers can analyze the behavior of a typical bot in order to sniff out new ones. They can limit the reach of news outlets that perpetually share stories flagged as false. They can see when accounts are coordinating their activity and wipe out whole networks at once. But determining whether a photo that’s been meme-ified and screenshotted a thousand times over depicts something real requires a different level of forensic analysis. Researchers are beginning to develop software that can detect altered images, but they’re locked in an arms race with increasingly skillful creators of fake images.”

CNET: Adobe AI learns to spot the photo fakery Photoshop makes easy

CNET: Adobe AI learns to spot the photo fakery Photoshop makes easy. “Photoshop fakery is getting more and more sophisticated, but Adobe Systems is using AI to detect when it’s happened. Plenty of photo editing is no big deal, but in some situations — for example, photojournalism, viral photos of politicians or celebrities and forensic evidence used by law enforcement — you might want a better idea of what’s true or not.”

Google cuts fake ad blockers from Chrome Store: Were you among 20 million fooled? (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Google cuts fake ad blockers from Chrome Store: Were you among 20 million fooled?. “A researcher has uncovered five malicious ad-blocker extensions on the Chrome Web Store that were installed by 20 million Chrome users before Google removed them. The bogus ad blockers were discovered by researchers at AdGuard, a Moscow-based maker of ad-blocking and anti-tracking tech.”

MakeUseOf: How to Spot 7 Online Fakes Used by Scammers

MakeUseOf: How to Spot 7 Online Fakes Used by Scammers. “Anyone who’s used the internet (hopefully) knows that you can’t trust everything you see online. Just because something looks trustworthy doesn’t mean that it’s exactly what it claims. But knowing there are fakes in the wild and being able to spot them are different.” Good roundup article with excellent examples.