How-To Geek: The Complete Guide to Giving Better Family Tech Support

How-To Geek: The Complete Guide to Giving Better Family Tech Support. “…we’re going to run through a crash course—with copious links to tutorials we’ve written in the past—that will help you whip your family’s tech life into shape, so their networks are secure, their computers are backed up, and everything is connected so you can easily help them in the future. The guide is divided into sections that, based on years of experience as the family tech support team, are the areas that are the most common (and pressing).”

Lifehacker: How to Prepare Your Digital Life for Your Death

Lifehacker: How to Prepare Your Digital Life for Your Death. “There are a number of ways loved ones can request access to your accounts once you’re gone, but they don’t need that stress. Several online services allow you to designate legacy contacts or grant access after a period of inactivity. Here’s how to make sure that those you leave behind are able to manage your affairs when you can’t anymore.”

The Verge: The unexpected catharsis of an Instagram location page

The Verge: The unexpected catharsis of an Instagram location page. “My father was born on May 12th. Today he would have turned 56, had he not passed away in 1996. When I was in college, my family and I would visit our motherland in Bangkok over the summer break in May, and our tradition was to always visit the temple where my dad’s ashes resided…. So when my brother and mom went back to Thailand this year without me for the first time in three years, all I could do was journey with them from afar as my brother Instagrammed his way through the travel. But this year, he did something he hadn’t done in the past. He tagged every location he visited, leaving behind breadcrumbs that would lead me to the temple’s location page on Instagram and filling a void I didn’t know existed.”

The Old Family Photos Project: Lessons in creating family photos that people want to keep (Medium)

Medium: The Old Family Photos Project: Lessons in creating family photos that people want to keep. “My father was an avid amateur photographer. He loved to take pictures, he invested in expensive cameras, and I’ve plenty of vacation memories where he had one of those cameras in hand. But organizing the slides afterwards? Labeling them? No way. Pop threw the boxes of slides in big piles and said, ‘I’ll sort them after I retire.’ And, in preparation for his retirement, he put all those slides into five huge boxes — the kind you’d use to ship vinyl records. Whereupon, three days after my father formally retired in 1988, he died in his sleep.”

Wired: Burning Memories

Wired: Burning Memories. “On Sunday night, October 8, my parents’ house in Napa burned to the ground in the wildfire. For my mom and dad, now in their eighties, the place had been a retirement escape from the hurlyburly of New York. My wife and I were married there 23 years ago, in the hillside living room looking out over a vine-carpeted valley. The fire turned this refuge into a heap of tile and ash. It also torched our family history: a mountain of scrapbooks, photo prints, and travel diaries that we will never mine again.”

TechCrunch: Mylestone lets you access your personal memories through Alexa

Genealogists, you might like this article from TechCrunch: Mylestone lets you access your personal memories through Alexa. “What if our photographs and social media updates could be turned into memories we – or our children – could later access just by asking a virtual assistant, like Amazon’s Alexa? That’s the premise behind a new startup called Mylestone, which is experimenting with turning our digital footprints into narratives that help us recall highlights from our lives, as well as those of our family members and other loved ones.”

NPR: Harnessing Social Media To Reconnect Homeless People With Their Families

NPR: Harnessing Social Media To Reconnect Homeless People With Their Families. “Naturally, someone in San Francisco had an idea to use technology to help alleviate one of the symptoms of homelessness: falling out of touch with one’s family. That’s the mission of Miracle Messages, an organization started by Kevin Adler in 2014. Volunteers record video messages from homeless people to their loved ones, who they have often not seen for many years. The organization then uses social media to publicize the videos in hope of contacting that person’s family.”