Trump’s lawyers: Courts have no say over his Twitter feed (Daily Collegian)

Daily Collegian: Trump’s lawyers: Courts have no say over his Twitter feed. “President Donald Trump can block his critics from following him on Twitter without violating the First Amendment despite a lawsuit’s claims that it violates the Constitution to do so, government lawyers say. Trial attorneys with the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington submitted papers late Friday to a New York federal judge, saying a lawsuit challenging Trump over the issue should be thrown out.”

NARA: Digitizing at Bush 43

NARA: Digitizing at Bush 43. “Digitization can be a time-consuming process. Once a box is selected for scanning, the records themselves must be analyzed. Are pages torn or fragile? Are documents single or double-sided? The characteristics of the records themselves determine how they will be scanned. Additionally, what are the saved files going to be named? How are they going to be organized? We use a file-naming convention that links numeric codes to each collection and series within our holdings. The files are housed in digital folders that mirror the physical organization of the records. Next, scanning begins.”

USA Today: Personal info on nearly 1,200 NFL players and agents exposed in NFLPA database leak

USA Today: Personal info on nearly 1,200 NFL players and agents exposed in NFLPA database leak. “Colin Kaepernick was among 1,133 players and agents whose personal information was exposed due to a misconfigured online database operated by the NFL Players Association, according to an internet security company.”

Bloomberg: Google Will Retool User Security in Wake of Political Hack

Bloomberg: Google Will Retool User Security in Wake of Political Hack. “The Alphabet Inc. company next month will begin offering a service called the Advanced Protection Program that places a collection of features onto accounts such as email, including a new block on third-party applications from accessing data. The program would effectively replace the need to use two-factor authentication to protect accounts with a pair of physical security keys. The company plans to market the product to corporate executives, politicians and others with heightened security concerns, these people said.”

Balkan Insight: Tito’s Name Still Adorns Streets Across Ex-Yugoslavia

Balkan Insight: Tito’s Name Still Adorns Streets Across Ex-Yugoslavia. “A new Google map…developed by Italian researcher Giorgio Comai shows that there are still 276 squares, streets and waterfronts named after former Yugoslav President Josip Broz Tito. The map, created using data from Google from August 2017, shows that more than half of them are located in Serbia – 176 squares, streets and waterfronts named after Tito.”

Mashable: Inside the black market where people pay thousands of dollars for Instagram verification

Mashable: Inside the black market where people pay thousands of dollars for Instagram verification. “The product for sale isn’t a good or a service. It’s a little blue check designated for public figures, celebrities, and brands on Instagram. It grants users a prime spot in search as well as access to special features. More importantly, it’s a status symbol. The blue emblem can help people gain legitimacy in the business of influencer marketing and bestows some credibility within Instagram’s community of 700 million monthly active users. It cannot be requested online or purchased, according to Instagram’s policies. It is Instagram’s velvet rope.”

I Saved Every Letter You Wrote Me: The Library of Congress Digitizes Hamilton (NPR)

NPR: I Saved Every Letter You Wrote Me: The Library of Congress Digitizes Hamilton. “If you’ve seen the hit musical Hamilton — or even if you’ve only heard about it — you might want to know more about the founding father who was the United States’ first Secretary of the Treasury. And if so, the Library of Congress just made it easier to go right to the source. Before, if you wanted to see — for example — Alexander Hamilton’s letters to his wife, you had to travel to the Library of Congress in Washington D.C., and even then, you’d have to view them on microfilm. Now, Julie Miller, the Library’s curator of Early American Manuscripts, says the collection has been digitized. “