Mashable: What the hell is the Omegaverse, and why is it all over TikTok?

Mashable: What the hell is the Omegaverse, and why is it all over TikTok? “The phrase has been part of fanfiction communities for the better part of the last decade, but it gained mainstream traction on TikTok in the past month. The tag #Omegaverse has over 357 million views on TikTok, and corresponding keywords like alpha, omega, and beta have racked up views in the millions as well….With excruciating self-awareness, here is an explainer on the Omegaverse for a hapless millennial trying to understand yet another TikTok trend.” Lots of sexual content, though probably not in a way that will trip a Web filter. I found myself giggling a lot.

The Atlantic: How to Murder Harry Potter

The Atlantic: How to Murder Harry Potter. “Quantifying the amount of deathfic available online is difficult. It pops up in surprising places, tucked into comment sections on obscure fan pages and sometimes written—flash-fiction style—entirely in the tags of a Tumblr post. On user-generated-fiction platforms such as Wattpad, Archive of Our Own, and FanFiction.Net, the number of deathfic entries is in the hundreds of thousands. These sites ask authors to label these stories with ‘character death’ warnings, and authors also tend to tag them with notes such as ‘why do I do this to myself’ and ‘why did I write this.’”

The Verge: Inside National Conspiracy Writing Month, A Challenge For Creating ‘Fan Fiction About Reality’

The Verge: Inside National Conspiracy Writing Month, A Challenge For Creating ‘Fan Fiction About Reality’. “The project is called National Conspiracy Writing Month, an unofficial spinoff of the long-running National Novel Writing Month (or NaNoWriMo) challenge. Where NaNoWriMo requires participants to write a 50,000-word novel, the inaugural NaCoWriMo asks them to produce a ‘deep, viable, and complete conspiracy theory.’ Its creator Tim Hwang hopes these fake plots can illuminate a pervasive cultural phenomenon — helping both participants and spectators understand how conspiracy theories emerge. He just hopes people don’t take them too seriously.” Oh dear. I don’t like this. It’s like forking National Fire Safety Month by having a kerosene-making contest.

Wired: Fans Are Better Than Tech at Organizing Information Online

Wired: Fans Are Better Than Tech at Organizing Information Online. “Kudos to the fans. One of the nominees for the Hugo Awards this year is Archive of Our Own, a fanfiction archive containing nearly 5 million fanworks—about the size of the English Wikipedia, and several years younger. It’s not just the fanfic, fanart, fanvids, and other fanworks, impressive as they are, that make Archive of Our Own worthy of one of the biggest honors in science fiction and fantasy. It’s also the architecture of the site itself.”

UCI News: UCI-led study finds Harry Potter fan fiction challenges cultural stereotypes of autism

Not quite in the wheelhouse, but I love it, I write fanfiction, and I have a close family member who’s an aspie. So, from UCI News: UCI-led study finds Harry Potter fan fiction challenges cultural stereotypes of autism. “Online publishing platforms and digital media can provide opportunities for nonmainstream groups to push back against and offer alternatives to the simplistic stereotypes presented in literature and popular culture. A study led by the University of California, Irvine focused on Harry Potter fan fiction and discovered that autistic people, family members, teachers and advocates cast autistic characters in their stories in diverse ways that challenge typical representations.”

Guy Scrapes FanFiction.net and Makes Huge Torrent

A guy has finished a huge project of scraping FanFiction.net and now has an enormous archive of text files. He’s probably going to Torrent them. I have mixed feelings about this. First, I’m not sure if this is in line with FanFiction’s terms of service – and FanFiction’s advertising (which I assume supports the site) is friendly and non-intrusive enough that you can’t even make the argument that the service has intrusive advertising that makes it hard to use. (Notice I did not say that was a valid excuse for circumventing the terms of service – I said you couldn’t even make that argument). On the other hand, if FanFiction went offline suddenly, what would happen to these stories? Are they being backed up anywhere? It’s not in the Wayback Machine at all, for example. Perhaps FanFiction.net could enact a switch for people who would like their stories archived?