Penn Today: ‘May the force be with you’ and other fan fiction favorites

Penn Today: ‘May the force be with you’ and other fan fiction favorites. “As a new Star Wars movie hits the multiplex, Penn researchers are launching a new computer-based tool to better understand fiction written by fans based on that blockbuster series and several other famous film franchises.”

Wired: The Pride and Prejudice of Online Fan Culture

Wired: The Pride and Prejudice of Online Fan Culture. “Go with me here. Janeites can be seen as internet culture avant la lettre—what Sebastian Heath, an archaeologist and professor of computational humanities and Roman archaeology at New York University, calls a ‘self-digitizing community.’ OK, yes, the Arpanet and packet switching don’t figure much in the misadventures of Emma Woodhouse or the Bennet sisters. But the Janeites represent a critical plot point in the evolution of online sociology.”

UPROXX: From Chance The Rapper To Nicki Minaj, How Social Media Challenges Replaced Rap Street Teams

UPROXX: From Chance The Rapper To Nicki Minaj, How Social Media Challenges Replaced Rap Street Teams. “In the early days of hip-hop, rappers used street teams to promote new albums, singles, and tours. Now, they have Instagram. As social media becomes more integrated into all of our daily lives, recording artists have also naturally incorporated it into the business of building and communicating with their fanbases. And, just as rapidly as social media itself innovated the way we debate, discuss, and interpret the world, artists have learned to leverage those online fanbases to useful real-world effect.”

Wired: Fans Are Better Than Tech at Organizing Information Online

Wired: Fans Are Better Than Tech at Organizing Information Online. “Kudos to the fans. One of the nominees for the Hugo Awards this year is Archive of Our Own, a fanfiction archive containing nearly 5 million fanworks—about the size of the English Wikipedia, and several years younger. It’s not just the fanfic, fanart, fanvids, and other fanworks, impressive as they are, that make Archive of Our Own worthy of one of the biggest honors in science fiction and fantasy. It’s also the architecture of the site itself.”

Engadget: Fan uses AI to remaster ‘Star Trek: Deep Space Nine’ in HD

Engadget: Fan uses AI to remaster ‘Star Trek: Deep Space Nine’ in HD. “Unfortunately, you’re highly unlikely to see an official remaster of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Its special effects were shot on video rather than added to film, making an already daunting remastering process that much more difficult — and since it’s not a tentpole show like The Next Generation, CBS might not consider it worth the effort. Machine learning might make it easier for fans to fill the gap, however.”

Equestria Daily: The Pony Music Archive Is Up! Download 600 GB of pony music in one go!

Now available — an enormous online archive of music related to My Little Pony. 600 GB is a lot, yeah? As I understand it, this is music related to and inspired by My Little Pony. (All I know about My Little Pony is that Tara Strong is one of the voices, so if I’m getting this wrong please correct me in the comments.) From the Equestria DAily article link: “The dedicated archivist ponies of the Pony Music Archive have completed a massive bundle of all the pony music that they could find in the best possible quality, resulting in more than 600 GB of music! The archive will be maintained with the new music coming out from now on, too.”

TechCrunch: Facebook wants up to 30% of fan subscriptions vs Patreon’s 5%

TechCrunch: Facebook wants up to 30% of fan subscriptions vs Patreon’s 5%. “Facebook will drive a hard bargain with influencers and artists judging by the terms of service for the social network’s Patreon-like Fan Subscriptions feature that lets people pay a monthly fee for access to a creator’s exclusive content. The policy document attained by TechCrunch shows Facebook plans to take up to a 30 percent cut of subscription revenue minus fees, compared to 5 percent by Patreon, 30 percent by YouTube, which covers fees and 50 percent by Twitch.” OF COURSE IT DOES.