Farmers Weekly: Thieves monitoring social media to target farm machinery

Farmers Weekly: Thieves monitoring social media to target farm machinery. “Criminal gangs are monitoring social media posts by farmers to create ‘shopping lists’ of tractors and quad bikes they then steal from farms. Thieves are using the social media profiles to pinpoint farms where desirable machinery is kept before carrying out raids. Offenders are also joining or ‘liking’ farming Facebook pages, including community groups, rural watch groups, and police liaison groups to stay one step ahead of farmers trying to prevent criminal activity.”

Wageningen University: New initiative to create global online database with production data from all over the worldanimal

Wageningen University & Research: New initiative to create global online database with animal production data from all over the world. “The Circular Food Systems (CiFoS) project at Wageningen University & Research (WUR) has decided to take the lead in making this data available for everyone by collecting it through an easily accessible online survey. The goal is to develop a global database that becomes an open resource for researchers, policymakers, farmers, businesses and anyone who is interested in the future of animal production.”

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: New Online ‘Farm Stat’ Tool Allows Farmers and Agronomists to Easily Analyze Data from Their Own On-Farm Research

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: New Online ‘Farm Stat’ Tool Allows Farmers and Agronomists to Easily Analyze Data from Their Own On-Farm Research. “A new tool, Farm Stat, is available on the Nebraska On-Farm Research Network (NOFRN) website. Farm Stat enables growers and agronomists to easily run statistical analysis of their own research studies…. Farm Stat is accessed online and allows producers or agronomists to specify how many treatments and replications their unique study had and then enter their yield data or other data to be statistically analyzed. The program will quickly produce a complete statistical analysis of variance that can be saved as a PDF.”

Millennium Post (India): How farmers are reclaiming their narrative through social media

Millennium Post (India): How farmers are reclaiming their narrative through social media. “While people protesting against the Central government often have to bear the brunt of trolls and certain media outlets twisting their narrative, the farmers blocking Delhi’s gates have kept up their movement throughout the last 11 days through social media mobilisation on channels like WhatsApp, Twitter and Instagram — amplifying their voices and helping it reach far and wide.”

The Spokesman-Review: Eat Local First Collaborative launches Washington Food & Farm Finder

The Spokesman-Review: Eat Local First Collaborative launches Washington Food & Farm Finder. “The Eat Local First Collaborative recently launched a mobile-friendly searchable database of more than 1,700 organic farms, food businesses and farmers markets in the state. The Washington Food & Farm Finder allows customers to search for markets based on location, product type and whether purveyors offer online ordering, curbside service or home delivery, among other things.”

High Country News: COVID-19 makes it harder to know when to harvest sugar beets

High Country News: COVID-19 makes it harder to know when to harvest sugar beets. “To create forecasts, meteorologists look to weather models fueled in part by temperature, pressure and humidity readings collected by commercial flights. But as the coronavirus pandemic swept the globe in early 2020, travel ground to a halt: In March, air traffic was cut by 75% to 80%, leaving meteorologists with just a fraction of their usual data, and, by September, many airlines were still operating less than half their pre-pandemic flights. Fewer readings mean that experts have an incomplete picture of what’s happening in our skies, resulting in murkier forecasts for farmers.”

Daily Democrat: Database connects grain growers, millers, bakers

Daily Democrat: Database connects grain growers, millers, bakers. “California wheat growers have taken the next step in developing premium markets, with the introduction of a new online tool intended to make it easier for all the major players in grains to find each other and cooperate in making the grain more profitable, environmentally sustainable and better for human health. The tool, Golden State Grains, is free software that lets users log on and quickly find, learn about and connect with farmers, seed suppliers, millers, maltsters and bakers.”

Spectrum News: Meet the New Generation of Farmers Tackling “Food Apartheid”

Spectrum News: Meet the New Generation of Farmers Tackling “Food Apartheid” . “Soul Fire Farm manger and founding co-director Leah Penniman’s harvest is enough to provide food to over 50 families throughout the Capital Region weekly…. The organization built an online database of BIPOC, short for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color, farmers which anyone can use to donate tools, funds or even land to support urban farm initiatives.”

India Today: Google turns farmer with project Mineral, its robots are growing soybeans and strawberries

India Today: Google turns farmer with project Mineral, its robots are growing soybeans and strawberries. “The current venture Mineral focuses on sustainable food production and farming at large scales, with a focus on ‘developing and testing a range of software and hardware prototypes based on breakthroughs in artificial intelligence, simulation, sensors, robotics and more,’ according to project lead Elliott Grant.”

Philadelphia Inquirer: A virtual Pennsylvania Farm Show without manure or milkshakes — but maybe a butter sculpture

Philadelphia Inquirer: A virtual Pennsylvania Farm Show without manure or milkshakes — but maybe a butter sculpture. “Manure won’t pack the same punch when the annual Pennsylvania Farm Show goes online this January. The odor’s one of the first things that visitors, particularly city dwellers and suburbanites, notice when entering the labyrinthine exhibition complex in Harrisburg, along with bleating sheep and squealing pigs, the collective din of thousands of animals from every corner of the state.”

The Citizens: Old issues of Farmers and Consumers Market Bulletin offer glimpse of agriculture in bygone times

The Citizens: Old issues of Farmers and Consumers Market Bulletin offer glimpse of agriculture in bygone times. “Agriculture in Georgia has changed a lot over the years, but one thing that has remained constant is the Farmers and Consumers Market Bulletin as the go-to resource for buying and selling livestock, farm supplies and equipment, handcrafted and homegrown items, as well as the latest agriculture and consumer news. Now, thanks to a partnership with the Georgia Department of Agriculture, the University of Georgia Map and Government Information Library (MAGIL), and the Digital Library of Georgia, Georgians can take a look back at the history of the Market Bulletin. More than 1,712 issues of the Farmers and Consumers Market Bulletin dating from 1926-1963 are now available in the Georgia Government Publications online database.”

WWLP: Locally sourced foods find platform on state exchange

WWLP: Locally sourced foods find platform on state exchange. “Pints of cherry tomatoes grown in Beverly, hundreds of pounds of salmon and haddock from a Boston pier, jars of curries and chutneys prepared by a Newton retailer, and communications support for local farms and fisheries are among the kaleidoscope of options up for sale on a new state-run online marketplace. The new MassGrown Exchange platform publicly launched [August 10] and offers a wide range of options to farmers, fishers, restaurants and anyone else linked to the Massachusetts food production industry, aiming to bring together and support both in-state producers and shoppers.”

HempGrower: Universities Partner to Create a Midwestern Hemp Database, Ask for Grower Participation

HempGrower: Universities Partner to Create a Midwestern Hemp Database, Ask for Grower Participation. “The university extensions of Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin and Purdue (Indiana) are searching for hemp farmers in their respective states who are willing to provide them with precisely taken crop samples and growing data in exchange for discounted cannabinoid testing. The universities will publish the wealth of data they receive from farmers on the Midwestern Hemp Database, an online tool already brimming with data from the project’s nearly 200 different varieties grown by about 70 registered participants so far.”