PR Newswire: Makeup Museum Unveils Digital Preservation Of Kevyn Aucoin’s Historic Journals (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Makeup Museum Unveils Digital Preservation Of Kevyn Aucoin’s Historic Journals (PRESS RELEASE). ” Makeup Museum today unveils images from a new digital archive of journals kept from 1983 to 1994 by legendary makeup artist Kevyn Aucoin. Aucoin worked extensively with iconic photographers such as Steven Meisel, Richard Avedon, Irving Penn, Peter Lindbergh, Herb Ritts, and Francesco Scavullo, models Cindy Crawford, Linda Evangelista, Claudia Schiffer, Paulina Porizkova, and celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, Tina Turner, Liza Minnelli, and many others. Aucoin’s journals chronicle his life and work, complete with behind-the-scenes images from photoshoots for VOGUE magazine and brands such as Shiseido, Chanel, and Revlon.”

AZ Central: With colorful wigs, Sen. Kyrsten Sinema turns age-old tradition on its head

AZ Central: With colorful wigs, Sen. Kyrsten Sinema turns age-old tradition on its head. “U.S. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema is reminding people to social distance while bringing back an age-old congressional tradition. The Democratic senator from Arizona, a platinum blonde with the help of hair dye, has sported bob-length wigs in mint green and lavender in the course of her public duties during the pandemic. The hairpieces help cover her own hair’s natural darker hues while reminding her constituents that it is impossible to safely dye hair at a salon under the CDC’s recommendations of remaining six feet away from others.”

BBC: Ghanaian Covid-19-inspired fashion wax-print designs launched

BBC: Ghanaian Covid-19-inspired fashion wax-print designs launched. “The new fabrics have symbols like padlocks, keys and planes to reflect some of the measures implemented to curb the spread of coronavirus. Wax prints are popular in Ghana, many office workers wear them on Fridays.” Those of you who read ResearchBuzz know that if I see something I don’t know about, I go looking for background. Slate has an extensive background on wax prints.

Arab News: Five fashion brands with digital-only collections

Arab News: Five fashion brands with digital-only collections. “What is a digital fashion collection? Essentially items that will never physically exist. Part creative outlet (dress your Bitmoji avatar in Alexander McQueen), part hypebeast flex (Fortnite’s ‘skins’ are now must-have revenue-drivers) and part opportunity for the fashion world to address its environmental footprint.”

Fashion United: Google partners with WWF on fashion sustainability platform

FashionUnited: Google partners with WWF on fashion sustainability platform. “Google has announced a partnership with WWF Sweden to help create an environmental data platform that will enable more sustainability in the fashion industry. The new data-enriched, decision-making platform aims to help drive responsible sourcing decisions in the fashion industry, by combining Google Cloud’s technical capacity, including big-data analysis and machine learning with WWF’s knowledge of assessing raw materials.”

The Guardian: Jailed for a Facebook post: garment workers’ rights at risk during Covid-19

The Guardian: Jailed for a Facebook post: garment workers’ rights at risk during Covid-19. “Several leading European fashion brands have launched investigations into allegations that factories in Myanmar are suppressing union activity under the guise of redundancies due to Covid-19 disruption. Workers in at least three factories making clothes for Zara, Primark and Mango have told the Guardian that managers are using Covid-19 disruptions as an excuse to dismiss hundreds of union members at different factories across the country.”

Canterbury Museum: Twentieth Century Fashion Goes Online

Canterbury Museum: Twentieth Century Fashion Goes Online. “From fabulous frocks to everyday garments, Invercargill-born Mollie Rodie Mackenzie amassed one of New Zealand’s most comprehensive collections of twentieth century fashion. Almost half of the 2,000 collection items can now be seen online, as a tribute to Mollie who died last month in Queensland aged 100. The collection includes nearly 800 accessories such as hats, shoes, handbags, gloves, necklaces, scarves, belts and neckties that complement the hundreds of dresses, jackets and shirts – women’s, men’s and children’s – that Mollie collected in her lifetime.

i-D: This new digital archive of STREET magazine is a timeless lesson in style

i-D: This new digital archive of STREET magazine is a timeless lesson in style. “Since 1985, Japanese fashion magazine STREET has published the best global street style on its pages and forged links between the different subcultures and style tribes that govern the trendiest corners of London, Paris, Tokyo and beyond. Three decades later, a lot has changed in the way we capture street style (and smartphones have all but replaced cigarettes) but its founder and Chief Editor Shoichi Aoki, the genius mind behind FRUiTS magazine as well, is still just as committed to documenting these trends. ‘I had noticed that there weren’t enough photographers documenting street style in the world back then,’ Shoichi says of the magazine’s origins. ‘I did not know about Mr. Bill Cunningham at the time, but I knew that there was good street fashion in Paris and London.'”

Thanks to COVID-19, there’s a new category in retail: the cloth face mask (Marketplace)

Marketplace: Thanks to COVID-19, there’s a new category in retail: the cloth face mask. “Every time I scroll through my Instagram feed now, there’s another ad for another company selling face masks. There are the classic ones in neutral tones. The ones made of organic cotton. The ones with → your company’s logo ← here. Overnight, the face mask has become America’s new T-shirt.”

Allure: The New Makeup Museum Launched a Digital Exhibit for Different Generations to Connect Over Beauty Memories

Allure: The New Makeup Museum Launched a Digital Exhibit for Different Generations to Connect Over Beauty Memories. “Beauty lovers had something very special to look forward to this spring: New York’s new Makeup Museum was scheduled to open on May 1 with its debut exhibit, Pink Jungle: 1950s Makeup in America. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, like so many events, the launch is on hold and visitors will have to wait a little longer to see the exploration of a past era’s cosmetics icons and artifacts. But in the meantime, the museum has launched an interactive online exhibit of sorts that will not only delight viewers but also foster meaningful connections and conversations during this socially isolated time.”

Nylon: High Fashion Houses Are Launching Social Media Projects For Fans At Home

Nylon: High Fashion Houses Are Launching Social Media Projects For Fans At Home. “Fashion houses are finding ways to keep the creativity going, even while working from home. Alexander McQueen, Balmain, and Bottega Veneta have all launched new initiatives all meant to thrive while the world is in isolation. On Wednesday, Alexander McQueen announced the McQueen Creators project, inviting fans to offer new interpretations of classic McQueen pieces presented through social media. For the first week, fans are encouraged to sketch, paint, or color the rose dress from its Fall 2019 collection, with some to be featured on Alexander McQueen’s Instagram page.”

Japan Times: Fashion week is compelled to go online

Japan Times: Fashion week is compelled to go online. “The runway shows and their accompanying exhibitions, where buyers’ orders are actually taken, incur astronomical costs. The size of the brand doesn’t matter, they all have to send out invitations via PR agencies, book models and plan after-parties — a significant financial outlay that must be recouped though sales in order to survive. For smaller brands, fashion weeks are already a gamble.”

High Snobriety: Meet the Curators Behind Instagram’s Favorite Moodboard Accounts

High Snobriety: Meet the Curators Behind Instagram’s Favorite Moodboard Accounts. “From famous ateliers to voracious consumers, Instagram pages have become an outlet for stream-of-consciousness expression, and attracted hundreds of thousands of followers in the process. You know these accounts when you see what’s on them: a leaked sneaker design; an archival, behind the scenes photo of an early Margiela collection; a Yahoo! Japan auction listing; an old EastBay catalog. Accounts like Lil Jupiter have made a name for their ability to tap into the taste level of this crowd, and parlayed it into partnerships, sneaker collaborations, or consulting gigs.”