ELLE: Fashion Responds To Climate Change With Digitized Versions Of Nature

ELLE: Fashion Responds To Climate Change With Digitized Versions Of Nature. “Florals for spring are not, as has been established, groundbreaking. But Huji-filtered superblooms on a dress? That’s far less expected. The term uncanny valley was coined by robotics scientist Masahiro Mori to describe the revulsion humans feel toward robots as they come to appear more and more lifelike. (Think of our collective fascination—and discomfort—with ‘realistic’ simulations like the CGI model/influencer Lil Miquela.) This wariness has tended to apply more to representations of humans than of nature, but as pristine wilderness becomes rarer and more threatened, these heightened representations of it feel more uncanny.”

The Lace Museum: An Online Archive for Historic Costuming (Kickstarter)

I haven’t mentioned a Kickstarter for a while but this looks great: The Lace Museum: An Online Archive for Historic Costuming. “The Lace Museum will be a free online museum which documents my extensive collection. I have already taken thousands of high-quality photos showcasing my pieces from every angle: close up, far away, front and back, honing in on all the interesting details that makes every piece special. It is an unprecedented look at the incredible craftsmanship and beauty of these pieces. A digital museum gives me the unique opportunity to show anyone, anywhere in the world pieces that may be rare, valuable, or difficult to otherwise display at a much closer scale than even an in-person exhibit could.”

Fashionista: Is It Even Possible To Be A Sustainable Influencer?

Fashionista: Is It Even Possible To Be A Sustainable Influencer?. “A small yet growing contingent of sustainable fashion influencers are questioning if ‘merching’ runs counter to their social and environmental ethos. Some, like [Ellie] Hughes, are shunning brands for their own closets or thrift-store finds. Others, like writer-stylist Aja Barber (@ajabarber), derive their revenue primarily through membership-based platforms like Patreon, where fans can donate to access exclusive content. One influencer, Hannah Neumann (formerly @lifestylejustice), even quit Instagram to establish a fair-trade factory in the Philippines. More may be wrestling with the cognitive dissonance of touting clothing or shoes people don’t necessarily need, even if they don’t talk about it.”

Vogue Business: AR filters for clothing come to Instagram

Vogue Business: AR filters for clothing come to Instagram. “Carlings, which created a sold-out digital clothing collection last year, has now released the €40 ‘Last Statement’ T-shirt that comes with a logo triggering various designs that appear on Instagram through augmented reality filters. When a customer points their Instagram camera at the T-shirt, a design appears; it shifts and moves along with the camera and the person. This allows the customer to digitally wear and share new designs without buying a new T-shirt, says Morten Grubak, Northern Europe executive creative director for Virtue, an agency that led the project.”

University of Arkansas: Wastewater Toolbox Launched to Help Textile Industry Improve Wastewater Footprint

University of Arkansas: Wastewater Toolbox Launched to Help Textile Industry Improve Wastewater Footprint. “The Sustainability Consortium, founded by the University of Arkansas and the University of Arizona in 2012, has launched a Wastewater 101 Toolbox to help the textile industry learn about the causes, impact and treatment of wastewater. This free online resource will help manufacturers, retailers and brands improve their wastewater footprint and help the producers of clothing and textiles have a lesser effect on people and the planet’s resources.”

Google Blog: When fashion and choreography meet artificial intelligence

Google Blog: When fashion and choreography meet artificial intelligence. “For our first experiment, Runway Palette, we came together with The Business of Fashion, whose collection includes 140,000 photos of runway looks from almost 4,000 fashion shows. If you could attend one fashion show per day, it would take you more than ten years to see them all. By extracting the main colors of each look, we used machine learning to organize the images by color palette, resulting in an interactive visualization of four years of fashion by almost 1,000 designers.”