Gravwell Blog: Discovering truth through lies on the internet – FCC comments analyzed

Gravwell Blog: Discovering truth through lies on the internet – FCC comments analyzed. “For this post, the Gravwell analytics team ingested all 22 million+ comments submitted to the FCC over the net neutrality issue. Using Gravwell we were able to rapidly conduct a variety of analysis against the data to pull out some pretty interesting findings. We scraped the entirety of the FCC comments over the course of a night and ingested them into Gravwell afterward. It took about an hour of poking around to get a handle on what the data was and the following research was conducted over about a 12 hour period. So we went from zero knowledge to interesting insights in half a day. We’re kinda nerding out about it.”

The Guardian: FCC flooded with comments before critical net neutrality vote

The Guardian: FCC flooded with comments before critical net neutrality vote. “A sweeping plan to roll back Obama-era rules intended to ensure an open internet has drawn a record number of comments before a critical vote by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). With hours left before the window for public feedback closes on Wednesday, the agency has received nearly nearly 22m comments on ‘Restoring Internet Freedom’, which could dismantle net neutrality rules put in place in 2015.” Unfortunately it’s not clear how many of them were fraudulent.

Ars Technica: FCC ‘apology’ shows anything can be posted to agency site using insecure API

Ars Technica: FCC ‘apology’ shows anything can be posted to agency site using insecure API. “The Federal Communications Commission’s website already gets a lot of traffic—sometimes more than it can handle. But thanks to a weakness in the interface that the FCC published for citizens to file comments on proposed rule changes, there’s a lot more interesting—and potentially malicious—content now flowing onto one FCC domain. The system allows just about any file to be hosted on the FCC’s site—potentially including malware.”

TechCrunch: FCC adds 2 weeks to comment period for the proposal to eliminate net neutrality rules

TechCrunch: FCC adds 2 weeks to comment period for the proposal to eliminate net neutrality rules. “The comment period for the FCC’s proposal to roll back the net neutrality rules established in 2015 was originally August 16 — next Wednesday. But after advocacy organizations asked the agency to add time to the clock in order to look through existing comments, the deadline has been extended (against the strenuous arguments of the broadband industry) by two weeks, to August 30.”

Ars Technica: FCC refuses to release text of more than 40,000 net neutrality complaints

Ars Technica: FCC refuses to release text of more than 40,000 net neutrality complaints. “The National Hispanic Media Coalition (NHMC) filed a Freedom of Information Act (FoIA) request in May of this year for tens of thousands of net neutrality complaints that Internet users filed against their ISPs. The NHMC argues that the details of these complaints are crucial for analyzing FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s proposal to overturn net neutrality rules. The coalition also asked the FCC to extend the initial comment deadline until 60 days after the commission fully complies with the FoIA request. A deadline extension would have given people more time to file public comments on the plan to eliminate net neutrality rules. Instead, the FCC yesterday denied the motion for an extension and said that it will only provide the text for a fraction of the complaints, because providing them all would be too burdensome.” Pffft.

Washington Post: Amazon, Kickstarter, Reddit and Mozilla are staging a net neutrality online protest

Washington Post: Amazon, Kickstarter, Reddit and Mozilla are staging a net neutrality online protest. “Some of the Internet’s biggest names are banding together for a ‘day of action’ to oppose the Federal Communications Commission, which is working to undo regulations for Internet providers that it passed during the Obama administration.”

Ars Technica: People who were impersonated by anti-net neutrality spammers blast FCC

Ars Technica: People who were impersonated by anti-net neutrality spammers blast FCC. “Fourteen people who say their names and addresses were attached to anti-net neutrality comments without their permission have asked the US Federal Communications Commission to notify other victims of the impersonation and remove fraudulent comments from the net neutrality docket.”