Ars Technica: Ajit Pai loses in court—judges overturn gutting of Tribal broadband program

Ars Technica: Ajit Pai loses in court—judges overturn gutting of Tribal broadband program. “A three-judge panel said the FCC failed to consider that facilities-based providers have been leaving the Lifeline program, and provided no evidence that banning resellers would spur new broadband deployment. The FCC also failed to properly consider how eliminating the subsidy in urban areas would affect consumers, judges determined.”

The Register: Our vulture listened to four hours of obtuse net neutrality legal blah-blah so you don’t have to: Here’s what’s happening

The Register: Our vulture listened to four hours of obtuse net neutrality legal blah-blah so you don’t have to: Here’s what’s happening. “The hearing, held in Washington DC, went on for hours. In fact, it went on for so long that one judge jokingly asked one of the lawyers whether he had brought some pizza with him. It was not easy going: the hearing was so intensely focused on specific legal definitions and precedents that parts of it were virtually incomprehensible.”

Gizmodo: Fake FCC Comments Linked to Ex-Trump Campaign Director’s Org, Boosted By Roger Stone

Gizmodo: Fake FCC Comments Linked to Ex-Trump Campaign Director’s Org, Boosted By Roger Stone . “An organization run by a former Trump campaign statewide director is being investigated by the New York attorney general’s office for its role in the submission of potentially hundreds of thousands of fraudulent comments to the Federal Communications Commission during the agency’s 2017 efforts to rollback Obama-era net neutrality rules.”

The Register: Man drives 6,000 miles to prove Uncle Sam’s cellphone coverage maps are wrong – and, boy, did he manage it

The Register: Man drives 6,000 miles to prove Uncle Sam’s cellphone coverage maps are wrong – and, boy, did he manage it . “A Vermont state employee drove 6,000 miles in six weeks to prove that the cellular coverage maps from the US government suck – and was wildly successful. In fact not only did he prove conclusively that reports delivered to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) by mobile operators aren’t worth the paper they’re printed on but also swung a spotlight on just how bad bureaucracy can get when it comes to Washington DC.”

Washington Post: These are the 2019 court fights that will decide the future of net neutrality

Washington Post: These are the 2019 court fights that will decide the future of net neutrality. “The battle over net neutrality is far from over. Although the Federal Communications Commission last year officially nixed the Obama-era rules governing the conduct of Internet providers such as Verizon and AT&T, the move kicked off a backlash by states, Internet activists and other supporters of the original regulations. Now their legal challenges will play out in 2019. Here’s what to expect as the fight over the future of the Internet enters its next act.”

Engadget: Google wins FCC approval to keep developing radar-based hand sensor

Engadget: Google wins FCC approval to keep developing radar-based hand sensor. “Google’s Advanced Technology and Projects (ATAP) team has been working on Project Soli since 2015. The gesture-based system uses broad beam radar to detect and capture hand movements, turning them into commands for mobile devices. Until now, though, the tech has been restricted, with some companies — including Facebook — claiming that the high frequency levels required might interfere with existing technology. Now, the FCC has granted a waiver that will allow Soli to operate at higher levels than currently allowed, and therefore continue development as Google originally intended.”