Engadget: Google Fiber could get a jolt from FCC utility pole policy

Engadget: Google Fiber could get a jolt from FCC utility pole policy. “Google Fiber could get serious help from a new rule (PDF) the FCC is set to pass that would give individual companies access to poles across the US. Currently, independent bodies — like, say, a new internet provider — who want to add their lines to poles must request telecoms to do the work, but the federal agency is considering implementing a nationwide One Touch Make Ready (OTMR) arrangement that would allow companies to add their cables themselves. In short, this could seriously help Google speed up the rollout of its high-speed internet solution.” Around here, at least, it feels like it’s at a standstill.

CNET: No, the FCC won’t charge you $225 to complain about robocalls

CNET: No, the FCC won’t charge you $225 to complain about robocalls. “The Federal Communications Chairman says it will not charge consumers $225 to hear their complaints about their phone providers. During the commission’s monthly meeting Thursday, Chairman Ajit Pai tried to clear up what he says is a misunderstanding over changes to the agency’s complaint process. The agency voted 3-1 to finalize a proposal that will “streamline and consolidate” rules for lodging complaints against phone companies. The revised rules consolidate rules that had been adopted over the past several decades and apply common deadlines for answering formal complaints and apply a shot clock to complaints about pole attachments.” I am including this for completion but I also feel I must add this disclaimer: I believe nothing the FCC says. If it announced that humans usually have two eyes I would go to a mirror and check.

“This is bonkers”: FCC wants to stop reviewing most complaints about ISPs (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: “This is bonkers”: FCC wants to stop reviewing most complaints about ISPs. “Ajit Pai’s Federal Communications Commission is proposing that it stop reviewing the vast majority of consumer complaints about telecom companies. Going forward, consumers harmed by broadband, TV, and phone companies would have to pay $225 in order to get an FCC review of their complaints.”

Gizmodo: FCC Emails Show Agency Spread Lies to Bolster Dubious DDoS Attack Claims

Gizmodo: FCC Emails Show Agency Spread Lies to Bolster Dubious DDoS Attack Claims. “As it wrestled with accusations about a fake cyberattack last spring, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) purposely misled several news organizations, choosing to feed journalists false information, while at the same time discouraging them from challenging the agency’s official story.”

Techdirt: Senators Ask FCC Why It Did Nothing To Stop Their Names From Being Fraudulently Used During Net Neutrality Repeal

Techdirt: Senators Ask FCC Why It Did Nothing To Stop Their Names From Being Fraudulently Used During Net Neutrality Repeal. “Last year you’ll recall that somebody abused the nonexistent privacy protections at the FCC website to flood the net neutrality repeal proceeding with millions of fake comments. While the vast majority of real people oppose the repeal, a bad actor was able to either fraudulently use the identities of real people (like myself), or hijack the identities of dead people to spam the proceeding with bogus support. The goal: undermine public trust in the public comment period in order to downplay the massive opposition to the FCC’s handout to AT&T and Comcast.”

Mashable: Tech keeps hitting the FCC over net neutrality

Mashable: Tech keeps hitting the FCC over net neutrality. “The internet isn’t letting net neutrality disappear without a fight. Several big tech companies, including Etsy, Expa, Kickstarter, Automattic, Foursquare, and Shutterstock, filed a petition on Monday with the Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit against the Federal Communication Commission’s decision to end net neutrality.”