PsyPost: A fear of medical procedures and injections accounts for about 10% of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in the UK

PsyPost: A fear of medical procedures and injections accounts for about 10% of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in the UK. “According to a study published in Psychological Medicine, a fear of blood, injections, and other medical procedures can explain about 10% of cases of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in the United Kingdom. The researchers call for initiatives to make the vaccination process less anxiety-provoking, given that the success of immunization programs relies on vaccinating as many people as possible — even those with fears of injection.”

New York Times: Afraid of Needles? Don’t Let It Keep You From a Covid-19 Vaccine.

New York Times: Afraid of Needles? Don’t Let It Keep You From a Covid-19 Vaccine.. “Most people aren’t particularly fond of needles. But to a significant number of people, the fear of needles goes beyond merely inducing anxiety into a more dangerous area, in which the fear prevents them from seeking out needed medical care. And as the world’s hopes of returning to a post-pandemic normal rest largely on people’s willingness to take a Covid-19 vaccine, experts and health care professionals are assuring those people that there are ways to overcome this fear.”

News@Northeastern: Here’s How To Combat The Fear Caused By A Barrage Of Covid-19 News

News@Northeastern: Here’s How To Combat The Fear Caused By A Barrage Of Covid-19 News. “By now, much of the world is under some form of isolation in an attempt to slow the spread of COVID-19—a worthwhile effort, but one that can create some emotional distress, as well. The constant inundation of emotionally fraught images and information about the disease can drive a dramatic increase in our sense of fear, giving our minds the impression that we’re under constant threat, says David DeSteno, a psychology professor at Northeastern.”

The Next Web: Meet the YouTube Mortician teaching people not to fear death

The Next Web: Meet the YouTube Mortician teaching people not to fear death. “Death is something we as a society don’t care to think or talk about — unless, like me, you stay up at night pondering about the inevitability of the inevitable. It’s not a case of ‘if’ you die, it’s ‘when’ you’ll die, and that’s a hard pill to swallow. But Caitlin Doughty, a LA-based Mortician and YouTube host of the channel, Ask A Mortician, answers all of our inquisitive and creepy questions about death — from what happens to breast implants in a crematory machine to what happens to a fetus if a woman dies when pregnant — everything that my young death-starved self needs and wants to know.”

Pacific Standard: Social Media Use Is Linked To A Fear Of Crime

Pacific Standard: Social Media Use Is Linked To A Fear Of Crime. “It has long been established that people who watch a lot of television tend to be more afraid of crime. Hours of watching police procedurals, courtroom dramas, and violence-heavy local news can lead one to conclude we live in a very scary world. A recently published, first-of-its-kind study updates this equation for the digital age. It reports that, for many people, time spent on social media appears to similarly heighten fears of being a crime victim.”

Quartz: MIT researchers trained AI to write horror stories based on 140,000 Reddit posts

Quartz: MIT researchers trained AI to write horror stories based on 140,000 Reddit posts. “Sometimes the scariest place to be is your own mind. Or Reddit at night. Shelley is an AI program that generates the beginnings of horror stories, and it’s trained by original horror fiction posted to Reddit. Designed by researchers from MIT Media Lab, Shelley launched on Twitter on Oct. 21.”

New Database of Horror Movie Jump Scares Takes You Straight to the Terrifying Parts

Do you love horror movies? Here ya go: a database of jump scares. “Where’s The Jump? does exactly what it says on the tin: consisting of a fairly cohesive catalogue of major horror movies and all the jump scares hiding within, including a listing of each individual moment and the time in the movie in which it occurs. Then, there’s an additional star rating to let people know the exact intensity and frequency of said jump scares.”