Just Released: A New Tool for Tracking Regional Employment Trends (Liberty Street Economics)

Liberty Street Economics: Just Released: A New Tool for Tracking Regional Employment Trends. “Today we are launching a Regional Employment web interactive that gives users a convenient place to measure and analyze employment trends in the Federal Reserve’s Second District…. The new interactive illustrates employment trends for more than twenty geographies in the region, including states and metropolitan areas, from the year 2000 to the latest available month.” From the Federal Reserve Bank of New York: “The New York Fed oversees the Second Federal Reserve District, which includes New York state, the 12 northern counties of New Jersey, Fairfield County in Connecticut, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Though it serves a geographically small area compared with those of other Federal Reserve Banks, the New York Fed is the largest Reserve Bank in terms of assets and volume of activity.” .

NPR: Inflation is still red hot, and it’s forcing the Federal Reserve into a new game plan

NPR: Inflation is still red hot, and it’s forcing the Federal Reserve into a new game plan. “The Federal Reserve is paving the way for possible interest rate hikes next year, in an effort to contain stubbornly high inflation. At the conclusion of a two-day policy meeting Wednesday, the central bank announced plans to phase out its large-scale bond-buying program faster than initially planned. The Fed started purchasing bonds during the pandemic as a way to keep borrowing costs across the economy low and to prevent any market disruptions.”

Twitter and the Federal Reserve: How the U.S. central bank is (and is not) surviving social media (Brookings Institute)

Brookings Institute: Twitter and the Federal Reserve: How the U.S. central bank is (and is not) surviving social media. “This paper seeks to connect these two discussions—about the Fed’s efforts to increase its communications and the president’s use of Twitter to attack the Fed’s monetary policy decisions—by focusing on how the Fed uses Twitter, a relatively new and surprisingly powerful medium on which officials communicate directly with citizens, reporters break news, and ordinary people across the globe engage in direct conversation with each other.”

Federal Reserve Board: Federal Reserve Board launches new Twitter account highlighting research published in the Board’s working papers and notes series, other staff articles, and conferences

Federal Reserve Board: Federal Reserve Board launches new Twitter account highlighting research published in the Board’s working papers and notes series, other staff articles, and conferences. “The Federal Reserve Board on Wednesday launched a new Twitter account aimed at increasing access to the research done by the more than 400 economists and other research staff at the Board.”

Federal Reserve: Federal Reserve Board publishes transcripts of more than 50 interviews with former policymakers and former senior staff that chronicle nearly half a century of Federal Reserve history

Federal Reserve: Federal Reserve Board publishes transcripts of more than 50 interviews with former policymakers and former senior staff that chronicle nearly half a century of Federal Reserve history . “The interviews, including with former chairs Paul A. Volcker, Alan Greenspan, and Janet L. Yellen, provide personal recollections of important economic, monetary policy, and regulatory developments. They also provide impressions of life and culture at the Federal Reserve Board.”

Several New Information Sources Added to FRASER (Banking, Finance)

A RB user who wishes to remain anonymous tipped me to several new sources at FRASER. FRASER stands for Federal Reserve Archival System for Economic Research and it was started at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. FRASER has an FAQ here. The first link is to a list of changes/additions to the system; notable resources which you might interesting include “Merchants’ Magazine, a monthly commerce magazine that was published from 1839-1870, discussing ‘every subject that can be interesting or useful to the merchant.’”, “Additional issues of the Annual Reports of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis”, and “Additional circulars of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, spanning 1940-1972”.