Duke Research Blog: Hamlet is Everywhere. To Cite, or Not to Cite?

Duke Research Blog: Hamlet is Everywhere. To Cite, or Not to Cite?. “Some stories are too good to forget. With almost formulaic accuracy, elements from classic narratives are constantly being reused and retained in our cultural consciousness, to the extent that a room of people who’ve never read Romeo and Juliet could probably still piece out its major plot points. But when stories are so pervasive, how can we tell what’s original and what’s Shakespeare with a facelift? This summer, three Duke undergraduate students in the Data+ summer research program built a computer program to find reused stories.”

The Daily Dot: Nonprofit fanfiction database Archive of Our Own wins a Hugo

The Daily Dot: Nonprofit fanfiction database Archive of Our Own wins a Hugo. “Archive of Our Own (AO3), the fan-run, nonprofit website that’s home to more than 5 million transformative works like fanfiction, fanart, and podfics, won one of science fiction’s most prestigious awards at Worldcon Sunday night.”

BuzzFeed News: YA Twitter Can Be Toxic, But It Also Points Out Real Problems

BuzzFeed News: YA Twitter Can Be Toxic, But It Also Points Out Real Problems. “However flawed social media may be, it’s still an important tool for giving marginalized voices and diversity advocates a much-needed platform. And if we set aside, for a moment, the focus on the authors; if we pause to remember that there are bad-faith voices in all parts of Twitter, not just YA; and if we step back and consider that the power to publish or cancel a book lies not with internet critics but with publishers and authors — then there’s another aspect of these stories that’s often ignored in mainstream discussions: What if these critics, with their focus on representation and diversity, have a point?”

Wired: Fans Are Better Than Tech at Organizing Information Online

Wired: Fans Are Better Than Tech at Organizing Information Online. “Kudos to the fans. One of the nominees for the Hugo Awards this year is Archive of Our Own, a fanfiction archive containing nearly 5 million fanworks—about the size of the English Wikipedia, and several years younger. It’s not just the fanfic, fanart, fanvids, and other fanworks, impressive as they are, that make Archive of Our Own worthy of one of the biggest honors in science fiction and fantasy. It’s also the architecture of the site itself.”

UK Web Archive Blog: Collecting Interactive Fiction

UK Web Archive Blog: Collecting Interactive Fiction. “Works of interactive fiction are stories where the reader/player can guide or affect the narrative in some way. This can be through turning to a specific page as in ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’, or clicking a link or typing text in digital works. “

New-to-me: A database of asexual and aromantic characters in prose fiction

New-to-me: a database of asexual and aromantic characters in prose fiction. The database covers various types of asexual (demi, grey, etc) and is sortable by a variety of factors. From the front page: “… I think these tables have the potential to do what I set out to accomplish: allow asexual and aromantic people to find themselves in a wide range of stories. Our narratives are out there, but too often it’s hard to find more than the same handful of well-known (and sometimes not-that-great rep) recommendations.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Digitization of the Pinebranch, the first student publication of South Georgia State Normal College and Georgia State Woman’s College (both earlier names for Valdosta State University)

Digital Library of Georgia: Digitization of the Pinebranch, the first student publication of South Georgia State Normal College and Georgia State Woman’s College (both earlier names for Valdosta State University). “The Digital Library of Georgia is pleased to announce the digitization of the Pinebranch, the first student publication of South Georgia State Normal College and Georgia State Woman’s College (both earlier names for Valdosta State University). The Pinebranch was a literary magazine published from September or October of 1917 to May of 1934. In addition to stories and poetry, the magazine included editorials, and news from campus and alumni.”