LUMIERE VOD: launch of the first directory of European films to increase transparency concerning the VOD markets (Film New Europe)

Film New Europe: LUMIERE VOD: launch of the first directory of European films to increase transparency concerning the VOD markets. “Launched by the European Commission with the European Audiovisual Observatory who is managing the project, this new directory of European films will help professionals, the public authorities and citizens to find information about European films and their availability on-line in video-on-demand (VOD) services throughout the European Union.”

MediArXiv: New digital archive for media research (NECSUS)

NECSUS: MediArXiv: New digital archive for media research. “The online platform Open Access in Media Studies has announced the launch of the new project MediArXiv. MediArXiv is the new open archive for media, film, and communication studies, and will be launched in early 2019 on the Open Science Framework platform. “

Library of Congress: National Screening Room of Free Motion Pictures Now Online

Library of Congress: National Screening Room of Free Motion Pictures Now Online. “The Library of Congress announced today that it has digitized hundreds of hours of motion pictures that will be freely available on the newly launched National Screening Room website. Most of the content in the National Screening Room is in the public domain. Movies that the Library believes to be in the public domain are fully downloadable. Permissions were granted for the inclusion of copyrighted motion pictures, which are only available as streaming files.”

The Guardian: How did some of cinema’s greatest films end up in an Iowa shed?

The Guardian: How did some of cinema’s greatest films end up in an Iowa shed?. “Michael Zahs thinks of himself as a saver. ‘I like to save things,’ he says, ‘especially if it looks like they’re too far gone.’ This retired history teacher from Iowa, now in his 70s, has amassed quite a collection over the years: stray animals, farm implements, even a church steeple. He can trace the lineage of the peach trees in his yard back to 1800. Nothing he has saved, however, has been quite as remarkable as the Brinton Collection – a mammoth set of films, lantern slides, posters and projection equipment from the first years of cinema, and even earlier.”

Talking New Media: Sight & Sound unveils digital archive with Exact Editions

Talking New Media: Sight & Sound unveils digital archive with Exact Editions. “Published by the BFI since 1932 Sight & Sound has partnered with digital publishing experts Exact Editions to develop this comprehensive research tool for institutions, universities, schools and other organisations around the world. With the archive’s launch, film fanatics and academics anywhere will be able to study 85 years of back issues of the magazine, as well as its long-running sister publication Monthly Film Bulletin (1934-1991), at the click of a button.”

The Saturday Paper: Restoring the National Film and Sound Archive

The Saturday Paper: Restoring the National Film and Sound Archive. “Today, federal budget cuts mean film preservation – as well as digitisation of rapidly deteriorating television shows on defunct 20th-century magnetic tape formats – is in competition for funding with provision of public access to existing screen works. Ninety years on from Norman Dawn’s cavalier indulgence on Sydney Harbour, Milliken and others argue, Australia’s modern film preservation bureaucracy lacks vision.”

Irish Film Institute Launches Online Viewer for Its Film Archive

The Irish Film Institute is making it easier for people around the world to explore its archives. “This morning (September 14th) the Irish Film Institute (IFI) launched their new IFI Player, a virtual viewing room for giving global audiences instant access to the Irish Film Archive. The IFI Irish Film Archive collects, preserves and shares Ireland’s national moving image collection, a diverse resource that chronicles over one hundred years of Irish achievement and experience. The Archive collection spans 1897 to the present day, and the cameras of filmmakers have captured the development of modern Ireland in a uniquely accessible manner.”