Mashable: 25 Stephen King short films are being shown at this virtual festival. Some have never been released.

Mashable: 25 Stephen King short films are being shown at this virtual festival. Some have never been released.. “The Stephen King Rules Dollar Baby Film Festival, a virtual event which will stream a number of short film adaptations based on the author’s work (including some which haven’t previously been released), is set to run from April 23 to 25 — and the best part is, the whole thing is free to join. 25 adaptations will be shown in total, each based on King short stories like Popsy, The Woman in the Room, and The Last Rung on the Ladder.”

The Streamable: New Streaming Service Cultpix Debuts With 400 Classic Cult Films

The Streamable: New Streaming Service Cultpix Debuts With 400 Classic Cult Films. “The platform will launch with a library of 400 cult classic and vintage films and TV shows. Looking to find an audience that has not been properly served by current providers, the content on Cultpix covers the gamut from Italian swordplay epics and Spanish horror to Swedish erotica and American slashers, seeking to draw from genre films published prior to the ’90s. The selection is expected to double by the end of the year thanks to a number of pending content deals.”

EurekAlert: Exploring how storytelling tropes cluster in popular films

EurekAlert: Exploring how storytelling tropes cluster in popular films. “An analysis of film tropes–common storytelling elements seen in different movies–explores combinations of tropes that tend to co-occur in films, identifying patterns that could help inform development of new movies. Pablo García-Sánchez and Juan Merelo of the University of Granada, and Antonio Velez-Estevez and Manuel Cobo from the University of Cádiz, Spain present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on March 31, 2021.”

‘Can You Find the Gun?’: virtual art festival explores social justice (The Mercury)

The Mercury: ‘Can You Find the Gun?’: virtual art festival explores social justice. “The festival showcases 13 projects that include short films and documentaries, animated shorts, an interactive digital archive and a video game. The pieces engage with topics ranging from the Black Lives Matter movement and police brutality to domestic violence and the impacts of the pandemic on different communities. The festival culminated in a panel event on March 31, but the works remain viewable on the [Social Justice Art & Film Festival] website.”

The Hindu: A portal for film archives

The Hindu: A portal for film archives. “To this day, there is a gap in documenting and archiving the history of Kannada cinema in an accessible way, which a new online portal… aims to fill. The portal, designed with fonts from yesteryear film posters, is drenched in nostalgia for old films, songs, their history, trivia, and rare-to-find photographs. Kannada is a language spoken in India. You can learn more about it here.

Lancaster University: Lancaster project captures the glamour and glitz of cinema in the 1930s and beyond

Lancaster University: Lancaster project captures the glamour and glitz of cinema in the 1930s and beyond . “Photographs of fabulous film stars and fascinating interviews form part of a stunning new online showcase to capture 1930s cinemagoing in Britain. The website, to help researchers and the public in their quest for information about the silver screen in the 1930s and beyond, has just been launched.”

Mashable: Everything to know about Documentary+

Mashable: Everything to know about Documentary+ . “Documentary+ features a range of docs in categories like music, politics, culture, true crime, science & nature, icons, sports, comedy, and cults. The streaming platform houses everything from Academy Award-winning films to festival favorites. While you can catch classic documentaries like The Imposter, Born into Brothels, Cartel Land, My Best Fiend, and Life, Animated, you can also find movies created by filmmakers including Spike Jonze, Terrence Malick, Brett Morgen, and Davis Guggenheim.” The service is 100% free. As in, “You don’t even have to create an account to watch content,” free.

Fortress of Solitude: Is IMDb Better Than Rotten Tomatoes?

Fortress of Solitude: Is IMDb Better Than Rotten Tomatoes?. “There’s a great war taking place online. Every time a film is released, it appears as if the audience and critics are on separate pages. In recent times, many have questioned the purpose and relevancy of Rotten Tomatoes, suggesting other sources for people who still want to view reviews. But is something like IMDb better than Rotten Tomatoes?”

Untapped New York: The Real Life Music Venues in Sylvie’s Love Set in 1950s NYC

Untapped New York: The Real Life Music Venues in Sylvie’s Love Set in 1950s NYC. “Set in 1957 Harlem, but filmed in modern-day Los Angeles, the film follows the complicated love story of aspiring television producer Sylvie Parker (Tessa Thompson) and jazz saxophonist Robert Halloway (Nnamdi Asomugha). Historic Los Angeles buildings and soundstage sets were used to recreate two iconic, New York City venues, Blue Morocco, a jazz club in the Bronx, and The Town Hall, a theater in Times Square. Read on to learn more about these two swinging sites, and discover more Sylvie’s Love filming locations here, on a brand new website dedicated solely to TV and movie filming locations from Untapped New York.”

Library of Congress: National Film Registry Spotlights Diverse Filmmakers in New Selections

Library of Congress: National Film Registry Spotlights Diverse Filmmakers in New Selections. “Selected because of their cultural, historic or aesthetic importance to the nation’s film heritage, the 2020 titles include blockbusters, musicals, silent films, documentaries and diverse stories transferred from books to screen. They bring the number of films selected for preservation in the registry to 800, a fraction of the 1.3 million films in the Library’s collections.” Shrek and Blues Brothers make it a very poppy-culture list.

Emerging Europe: Latvia celebrates a century of fillmmaking

Emerging Europe: Latvia celebrates a century of fillmmaking. “For the first time ever, a collection of classic and significant Latvian movies has been made available to stream online free of charge, complete with subtitles in English and several other languages. For those who do not yet speak Latvian, it’s a great opportunity to learn more about Latvian culture and history.”

Jerusalem Post: National Library’s Docu.Text film festival goes online

Jerusalem Post: National Library’s Docu.Text film festival goes online. “Read all about it: the National Library of Israel’s sixth annual Docu.Text Film Festival is going digital this year, with festivals in both the US and Israel, November 15-25. Both festivals feature award-winning documentary films, Q and A sessions, and a number of special events. All the events are free, while viewers need to pay to stream the films.”

Irish News: BFI’s most rewatchable British films hidden on Google Maps to watch for free

Irish News: BFI’s most rewatchable British films hidden on Google Maps to watch for free. “Google is encouraging people to rediscover and download films including Skyfall and Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were-Rabbit, in collaboration with the British Film Institute (BFI). Around 40 of the 50 top rewatchable films from the last 50 years, as chosen by the BFI, will be hidden in UK locations relating to where they were set, discoverable on Google Maps.”

University College Cork, Ireland: Cork International Film Festival Digital Archive

University College Cork, Ireland: Cork International Film Festival Digital Archive. “The initiative was coordinated by the Department of Digital Humanities in UCC collaboration with the Department of Film & Screen Media and the festival team. The collection contains photographs, programmes and posters spanning the festival’s long history. The project is ongoing and the general public is invited to submit their own memorabilia and stories of festival experiences.”

Hyperallergic: Now Is the Perfect Time to Learn About William Greaves

Hyperallergic: Now Is the Perfect Time to Learn About William Greaves. “An active filmmaker for nearly 50 years before his death in 2014, William Greaves was continually at the forefront of Black independent directors in the US. He was a vital contributor to the long-running public affairs show Black Journal (episodes of which are archived online), and directed numerous short and feature documentaries about the Civil Rights Movement and Black American life….Recently, under the supervision of Greaves’s widow Louise and avant-garde filmmaker Su Friedrich, a new website dedicated to his work has launched.”