“Jump Cut” is a Model Open Journal: Digitized from Microfilm & Hosted on Archive.org (Internet Archive)

Internet Archive: “Jump Cut” is a Model Open Journal: Digitized from Microfilm & Hosted on Archive.org. “From the beginning, Jump Cut was all about being accessible and uncensored. Now, the alternative media criticism journal has achieved maximum exposure: All of its back issues are available digitally for free through the Internet Archive. John Hess, Chuck Kleinhans, and Julia Lesage launched the publication when they were graduate students at Indiana University in 1974.”

Los Angeles Times: Make film history more inclusive. That’s Jacqueline Stewart’s mandate at Academy Museum

Los Angeles Times: Make film history more inclusive. That’s Jacqueline Stewart’s mandate at Academy Museum. “Jacqueline Stewart was already one of the nation’s leading film scholars before she took the job of chief artistic and programming officer at the new Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Now she’s helming the presentation of perhaps the most significant museum dedicated to movies in the country.”

Tripped Over While Going Through Google Alerts: Timeline of Historical Film Colors

I gave up on keeping up with the entire Web around about 1996, and I’m *still* delighted when I discover something that’s been quietly trucking along for ages doing good work. Check out Timeline of Historical Film Colors. From the About page: “This database was created in 2012 and has been developed and curated by Barbara Flueckiger, professor at the Department of Film Studies, University of Zurich to provide comprehensive information about historical film color processes invented since the end of the 19th century including specific still photography color technologies that were their conceptual predecessors.”

New York Times: China’s Censorship Widens to Hong Kong’s Vaunted Film Industry, With Global Implications

New York Times: China’s Censorship Widens to Hong Kong’s Vaunted Film Industry, With Global Implications. “The city’s government on Friday said it would begin blocking the distribution of films that are deemed to undermine national security, marking the official arrival of mainland Chinese-style censorship in one of Asia’s most celebrated filmmaking hubs.”

Boing Boing: The Met just posted Hilary Harris’s Organism (1975) to YouTube

Boing Boing: The Met just posted Hilary Harris’s Organism (1975) to YouTube. “It took documentary filmmaker Hilary Harris (1929 – 1999) 15 years to make his short time-lapse film depicting Manhattan as a living creature. Called Organism, it was completed in 1975 and is considered to be a forerunner to Godfrey Reggio’s Koyaanisqatsi (1982). It’s also fun to see New York in its grimy heyday.”

Film New Europe: Almost 3000 Titles Digitally Restored by Polish TVP

Film New Europe: Almost 3000 Titles Digitally Restored by Polish TVP. “The Polish public broadcaster TVP has digitally restored almost 3,000 film and television productions. In addition, the company has digitalised as much as 1,000 km of film. The reconstructed productions include popular series, feature and documentary films, TV theatre performances and programmes for children. The budget of the project was over 17.9 m EUR / 80 m PLN.” That’s a little over 21.8 million USD.

Las Cruces Sun-News: State records grant expands historically rich film culture in southern New Mexico

Las Cruces Sun-News: State records grant expands historically rich film culture in southern New Mexico. “Weeks before his passing in February 2019, Julia Smith of NMSU filmed a series of interviews with [Orville] Wanzer, having learned of his archive at NMSU and seeing his works at the Institute of Historical Survey Foundation in Mesilla Park…. Over the last two years, Smith has been working to digitize and curate the Wanzer collections at these archives, especially his 16 and 35mm films housed at NMSU, and his photographic slides at IHSF.”

Mashable: 25 Stephen King short films are being shown at this virtual festival. Some have never been released.

Mashable: 25 Stephen King short films are being shown at this virtual festival. Some have never been released.. “The Stephen King Rules Dollar Baby Film Festival, a virtual event which will stream a number of short film adaptations based on the author’s work (including some which haven’t previously been released), is set to run from April 23 to 25 — and the best part is, the whole thing is free to join. 25 adaptations will be shown in total, each based on King short stories like Popsy, The Woman in the Room, and The Last Rung on the Ladder.”

The Streamable: New Streaming Service Cultpix Debuts With 400 Classic Cult Films

The Streamable: New Streaming Service Cultpix Debuts With 400 Classic Cult Films. “The platform will launch with a library of 400 cult classic and vintage films and TV shows. Looking to find an audience that has not been properly served by current providers, the content on Cultpix covers the gamut from Italian swordplay epics and Spanish horror to Swedish erotica and American slashers, seeking to draw from genre films published prior to the ’90s. The selection is expected to double by the end of the year thanks to a number of pending content deals.”

EurekAlert: Exploring how storytelling tropes cluster in popular films

EurekAlert: Exploring how storytelling tropes cluster in popular films. “An analysis of film tropes–common storytelling elements seen in different movies–explores combinations of tropes that tend to co-occur in films, identifying patterns that could help inform development of new movies. Pablo García-Sánchez and Juan Merelo of the University of Granada, and Antonio Velez-Estevez and Manuel Cobo from the University of Cádiz, Spain present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on March 31, 2021.”

‘Can You Find the Gun?’: virtual art festival explores social justice (The Mercury)

The Mercury: ‘Can You Find the Gun?’: virtual art festival explores social justice. “The festival showcases 13 projects that include short films and documentaries, animated shorts, an interactive digital archive and a video game. The pieces engage with topics ranging from the Black Lives Matter movement and police brutality to domestic violence and the impacts of the pandemic on different communities. The festival culminated in a panel event on March 31, but the works remain viewable on the [Social Justice Art & Film Festival] website.”

The Hindu: A portal for film archives

The Hindu: A portal for film archives. “To this day, there is a gap in documenting and archiving the history of Kannada cinema in an accessible way, which a new online portal… aims to fill. The portal, designed with fonts from yesteryear film posters, is drenched in nostalgia for old films, songs, their history, trivia, and rare-to-find photographs. Kannada is a language spoken in India. You can learn more about it here.

Lancaster University: Lancaster project captures the glamour and glitz of cinema in the 1930s and beyond

Lancaster University: Lancaster project captures the glamour and glitz of cinema in the 1930s and beyond . “Photographs of fabulous film stars and fascinating interviews form part of a stunning new online showcase to capture 1930s cinemagoing in Britain. The website, to help researchers and the public in their quest for information about the silver screen in the 1930s and beyond, has just been launched.”

Mashable: Everything to know about Documentary+

Mashable: Everything to know about Documentary+ . “Documentary+ features a range of docs in categories like music, politics, culture, true crime, science & nature, icons, sports, comedy, and cults. The streaming platform houses everything from Academy Award-winning films to festival favorites. While you can catch classic documentaries like The Imposter, Born into Brothels, Cartel Land, My Best Fiend, and Life, Animated, you can also find movies created by filmmakers including Spike Jonze, Terrence Malick, Brett Morgen, and Davis Guggenheim.” The service is 100% free. As in, “You don’t even have to create an account to watch content,” free.

Fortress of Solitude: Is IMDb Better Than Rotten Tomatoes?

Fortress of Solitude: Is IMDb Better Than Rotten Tomatoes?. “There’s a great war taking place online. Every time a film is released, it appears as if the audience and critics are on separate pages. In recent times, many have questioned the purpose and relevancy of Rotten Tomatoes, suggesting other sources for people who still want to view reviews. But is something like IMDb better than Rotten Tomatoes?”